Mark 9:19 O faithless generation, how long shall I be with you?...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

O your type, suspicious, until when will I be near you?  Until when will I sustain you? Fetch him me.

KJV : 

Mark 9:19 O faithless generation, how long shall I be with you? how long shall I suffer you? bring him unto me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

As we often see, the version here is a shortened version of Matthew. In Greek, this isn't as negative and critical as the English translation.  Jesus isn't saying that he "suffers" his generation,. He says that he must sustain it and hold it up. He doesn't ask for the boy to be bought to him. Instead he asks for them both to be brought together. There are a couple of uncommon Greek words here, used only in this phrase and the parallels in Luke and Matthew. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

 (exclam)  "O" is from o, which is an exclamation "O!" or "Oh!" often used as a mode of address. 

γενεὰ (noun sg fem voc) "Generation" is a Greek word that means "race", "family", "offspring," and "age."

ἄπιστος (adj sg fem voc/n0m) "Faithless" is apistos, which means "not to be trusted" "mistrustful", "incredulous," disobedient, "disloyal," or "suspicious."

ἕως (con) "How" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that." -- The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

πότε (partic)  "Long" is pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

πρὸς (prep) "With" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." 

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

ἔσομαι; (verb 1st sg fut ind mid) "Shall I be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai.)

ἕως (conj) "How " is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that."

πότε (partic) "Long" is pote, which means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

ἀνέξομαι [uncommon](verb 1st sg fut ind mid) "Suffer" is anechomai, which means "to hold up", "to lift up", "sustain", "appear", "show oneself", "stand up", "come forth", "hold on", "keep doing", "hold up", "cease", "hold up what is one's own", "hold oneself up", "bear up", "be of good courage," rarely, "hold on by one another", "hang together," (of events) "arise,""happen," and, metaph., "uphold," and "maintain."

ὑμῶν; (pron 2nd pl gen) "You" is from humon, the plural form the pronoun of the second person, "you."

φέρετέ (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Bring " is from phero, which means to "bear", "tarry", "bring", "produce", "fetch, "endure", "suffer", "bring to bear", "lead", "direct", "bear along [of wind]", "offer", "present", "produce", "cause", "adduce", "bring forward", "pay something due or owing", "bring in", "yield as rent [of property]", "apply," and "refer.

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

με. (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is me, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

KJV Analysis: 

O --  The "o" is an exclamation "O!" or "Oh!" often used as a mode of address. 

faithless -- The Greek word translated as "faithless" means literally "no faith," but it meant "not to be trusted" and "mistrustful." The word translated as faithless means literally without faith, but not in the sense of lacking religious faith. It means both untrustworthy and distrusting. It carries a sense that someone who is distrusting is also probably untrustworthy.

generation, -- The word translated as "generation" means "race" or "family." It is the word from which we get "genus" in English.

how -- The word translated as "how long" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

long -- The word "long" here means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

shall -- This is from the future tense of the following verb.

I -- This is from the first-person form fo the following verb.

be -- "Be" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible."

with --  The word translated as "with" means "towards", "before," "by reason of (for)," and "against."  the sense here is "before."

you? -- The "you" here is plural, indicating many of Christ's listeners as the object of the verb.

how -- The word translated as "how" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

long -- The word "long" here means "when", "at what time", "at some time or other", "at some unknown time, and "at some time in the future."

shall -- This is from the future tense of the following verb.

I -- This is from the first-person form fo the following verb.

suffer -- The word translated as "suffer" primarily means "to hold up", "to lift up", "sustain", "appear," with a lot of related meaning about supporting yourself or others. This word is only used in this verse and its parallel in Mark and Luke. 

you?  -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

bring -- The word translated as "bring" means "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch." It is the base of a lot of words Christ uses commonly, including the words that mean "bring together", "bring to," and "bring through." Its use is more like our use of the word "get."

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  The word is an object of the verb, what is brought.

unto  -- This is normally from the form of the following pronoun but here that pronoun a direct object. This word should not be here.

me. -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek. The word is an object of the verb, what is brought. Both the boy and Jesus are being brought.

Front Page Date: 

Sep 7 2019