Mark 10:27 With men [it is] impossible, but not with God...

KJV Verse: 

Mark 10:27 With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Issuing from people, no power, but not from Divinity. All things, accordingly, possible from the Divine.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Jesus's statement is much shorter and more pointed that the translation. It is a verbal comment in the context of the question asked. It is not made in complete sentences. Much is added to the KJV to transform it into sentences. The "it is" is implied by the form fo the word "impossible" but that word is not a normal subject, in the nominative case. It is in the accusative case because it is a subject of the infinitive in the "to be saved" question  asked. This word is only used by Jesus here and in the similar quotes in Matthew and Mark.   The Greek words translated as "possible" and "impossible" refer to having a certain power or capability not to what is possible or impossible in general. The negative form, used here, is formed by adding an "a" to the beginning of the word meaning "having that power" so it becomes "not having the power."  Perhaps "incapable" comes closer.  Jesus here uses the term translated as "God" without a definite article likes he usually does so the sense is "a god."  "God" is the punchline here, ending the verse.

KJV Analysis: 

With -- "With" is from a preposition that means "besides", "from", "near," and "by the side of." Here, the sense is coming from" referring to a rescue that is, being saved.

men -- The Greek word for "men" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

it is -- There is no Greek words saying this. This was added by the KJV to make sense of the following word. The verb "to be" is implied when a subject is used without a verb/

impossible, --"Impossible" " is from an adjective that means "unable to do a thing", "without power," and "powerless." Of things, it means "impossible," and "unrealizable." It comes from the negative of the word means "having power."

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".  This is a different "but" than the one in Matthew.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

with "With" is from a preposition that means "besides", "from", "near," and "by the side of." Here, the sense is
coming from" referring to a rescue.

God: The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." This is one of the rare times when there is no article with this word so "a god" or simply "God". Jesus usually used it with a definite article, but here he does not, at least no initially.

for -- The word transalted as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence. However, since this word always appears in the second position, it is more like an aside remark like, "as an explanation," "as a cause," "accordingly," and "consequently."

with -- "With" is from a preposition that means "besides", "from", "near," and "by the side of."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which only appears in some texts. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

all things -- The word translated as "all things" is one word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. It is in the plural, so we would say "everything." are possible.

are -- There is no Greek verb "are" in this part of the sentence. However, it is implied by the fact that both "all things" and "possible" are in the form of a subject, thenominative case, used without a verb.

possible. -- "Possible" is from an adjective that means "strong", "mighty," and "practicable." Of things, it means "possible." It is the noun form of the verb means "having power." A verb is often translated as "can" in the Greek. The form of the word is again used as a plural neutral noun, being introduced by an article.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Παρὰ "With" is from para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

ἀνθρώποις (noun pl masc dat) "Man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἀδύνατόν (adj sg masc/fem/neut acc) "Impossible" is from adynatos, which means "unable to do a thing", "without power", "powerless", "without strength", "without skill," "(of things) impossible," and "unrealizable." As an adverb, "weakly," and "feebly."

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

παρὰ (prep) "With" is from para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

θεῷ ( noun sg masc dat) "God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

πάντα (adj pl neut nom) "All things" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

γὰρ (partic) "For" is gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

δυνατά.” (adj pl neut nom) "Possible" is from dynatos, which means "strong", "mighty," (of things) "possible," "powerful," "influential", "able to produce", "productive," (of things) "possible," and "practicable."

παρὰ (prep) "With" is from para, which means "beside", "from the side of", "from beside,", "from", "issuing from", "near", "by", "with", "along", "past", "beyond", "parallel (geometry)", "like (metaphor)", "a parody of (metaphor)", "precisely at the moment of (time)," and "throughout (time)."

[τῷ] (article sg masc dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

θεῷ”. ( noun sg masc dat) "God" is from theos, which means "God," the Deity."

Related Verses: 

Oct 14 2019