Mark 10:24 Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches...

KJV Verse: 

Mark 10:24 Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom of God!

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Children! In a certain way, those persuaded by property are hard to please going into the universal rule.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The phrase "for them that trust in riches" doesn't exist in the Greek we use today. When Jesus repeats an idea, he has a reason. This repetition is useful because of the humorous nature of the previous verse were its meaning doesn't unfold until the last word.  It isn't clear that Jesus is addressing his followers as "children." He only does this one other place (John 13:33).  His saying that those with property would be discontented entering into the kingdom of God (see previous verse). He sees their assumption, that everyone would be happy coming under God's rule, as childish.

KJV Analysis: 

Children, -- The word translated as "children" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Jesus  does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."  The form could be one of address (vocative), the subject of the sentence, or the object of the sentence. 

how -- "How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

hard  -- "Hard" is the keyword here. It is an adjective that means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain." The form of the word is an adverb. As an adverb, it would mean "peevishly" or "fretfully".

is  -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

for them that trust in riches -- These words don't exist in the Greek we use today.

to -- This is from the infitiive form of the verb, which requires a "to" in English.

enter -- "Enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."  The tense is future and the form is the subject acting on themselves.

into The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article.The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

kingdom -- The word translated as "kingdom" can be the region, the reign, the castle or the authority of a ruler. Christ does not seem to use it to mean a physical region, so its translation as "reign" or "realm" seems more appropriate. This is especially true because the "reign" of a king means the execution of his will.

of -- This is from the genitive form of following article and noun.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God! -- The word translated as "of God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods. It is possessive so "of the Divine"

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τέκνα, ( noun pl neut nom/acc/voc ) "Children" is teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young."

πῶς (adv/conj) "How" is pos, which means "how", "how in the world", "how then", "in any way", "at all", "by any mean", "in a certain way,"and "I suppose." -- "How" is the adverb that means "how", "by any means", and "I suppose". 

δύσκολόν   (adv/adj pl masc acc) "Hardly" is from dyskolos, which means "hard to satisfy with food", "hard to please", "discontented", "fretful", "peevish," and "difficult to explain." As an adverb. "hardly" and "with difficulty."

ἐστιν ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act )  "Is" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The 3rd person present form used here is "esti.")

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."-- The word translated as "the" [The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

βασιλείαν (noun sg fem nom) "The kingdom" is basileia, which means "kingdom", "dominion", "hereditary monarchy", "kingly office," (passive) "being ruled by a king," and "reign."

εἰσελθεῖν: ( verb aor inf act )  "Shall enter" is from eiserchomai, which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

Front Page Date: 

Oct 12 2019