Luke 11:43 Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 11:43 Woe unto you, Pharisees! for ye love the uppermost seats in the synagogues, and greetings in the markets.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Sadly for you, the separated, because you embrace the best recliners in the meeting places and the hugging in the marketplace. 

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse joins together two verses from Matthew (Matthew 23:6Matthew 23:7 ) using the same vocabulary. 

"Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." Today we would say "sadly [for you]" or "boo-hoo to you." More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

"Pharisees" is an example of where we use the Greek word as the name of the religious sect, instead of translating it. In Greek, the word means the "separatists" or "the judgmental," but it is from a Hebrew word meaning "distinguished" or "elite."

The word translated as "for" introduces a statement of fact or cause. It is not the word normally translated as "for" in the Gospel, but a word normally translated as "that."

The word translated as "ye love" expresses a lot of different ideas including "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", and "to be contented with." See this article on love for more information.

"Uppermost rooms" is from a word that means "foremost recliners" describing the best or initial recliners at a table for eating.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The Greek word translated as "synagogues" is the source of our English word. It simply means an assembly. a meeting, or place of assembly. It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together." Instead of translating it, the KJV simply uses the Greek word.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek word translated as "greeting," means "greeting," "embrace," and "affection."

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"Marketplace" is from a word which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace." "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace. The verb form means "to sell."

 

 

Vocabulary: 

οὐαὶ (exclm) "Woe" is from ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas." --

ὑμῖν, (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from hymin (humin), which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun. Dative is the case which indicates to whom something is given. 

 τοῖς Φαρισαίοις, (noun pl masc dat) "Pharisees" is from Pharisaios, which means "the separated", "the separate ones", "separatist" and refers to the religious sect. The word comes from the Hebrew, pharash, which means "to distinguish." So the sense is also "the distinguished" or "the elite."

ὅτι "For" is from hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἀγαπᾶτε (verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Ye love" is agapao, which means "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", "to caress", "to prize", "to desire", "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with." 

τὴν πρωτοκαθεδρίαν  [uncommon] (noun sg fem acc) "Uppermost rooms" is from protoklisia, which means "first seat at table," literally "foremost couches." The prefix in this word means "first" and "highest" from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." In order, it means "the first." Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." It's root is klisia, which means "a place for lying down or reclining", "anything for lying or sitting upon," a "couch for reclining at a table", "nuptial bed," and a "company" of people reclining at meals.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς συναγωγαῖς (noun pl fem dat) "Synagogues" is from synagoge, which means a "bringing together", "assembly", "place of assembly", "contracting", "collection", "combination", "conclusion," and "demonstration." It comes from a Greek word Christ uses commonly, sunagô, to mean "gather" or "bring together."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τοὺς ἀσπασμοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Greetings" is from aspasmos, which means "greeting", "embrace," and "affection."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς ἀγοραῖς (noun pl fem dat) "The marketplace" is from agora, which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace." "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace.

Related Verses: 

Mar 11 2018