Matthew 23:7 And greetings in the markets,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 23:7 And greetings in the markets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Not only [do they embrace] the hugging within the marketplace but also to name themselves "Great" with the people.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is easier to understant if it is combines with the previous verse, Mat 23:6. The active verb for both verses appears in the prior verse (included here for clarity) and there are two plays on words made between the two verses that are hidden in translation.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." It is used in a series here. The "not only...but also" translation works best because of the advisarily tone of this section generally.

The Greek word translated as "greeting," means "greeting," "embrace," and "affection."

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

"Marketplace" is from a word which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace." "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace. The verb form means "to sell."

The word translated as "of" primarily means "by", "under," or "with" (with the genitive and a passive verb). Its primary meaning is "under" both in the sense of moving under, being under, and being under different forms of compulsion.

The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "person" and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural. Here it is plural. It is also introduce by an article, "the people."

"Rabbi" is from a Hebrew word, not a Greek word, that means "much", "many", "great", "strong," and "greater than." This word is not repeated. It is the first time that the word is used in the Gospels, and Christ does not use it again after the next verse, which tells others not to use it. All other use of this word are by others addressing Christ.

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τοὺς ἀσπασμοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Greetings" is from aspasmos, which means "greeting", "embrace," and "affection."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ταῖς ἀγοραῖς (noun pl fem dat) "The marketplace" is from agora, which means "an assembly", "place of assembly," and "marketplace." "Public speaking" meant speaking in the marketplace.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

καλεῖσθαι (verb pres inf mp) "To be called" is from kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand." -- The term translated as "call" is like our word "call" means both "to summon" and also "to name."

ὑπὸ (noun pl masc gen) "Of" is from hypo (hupo), which means [with genitive] "from under (of motion)", "down under," under, beneath," indicating a cause with passive verbs, "by", "under," or "with", "under the cover or protection of", "of the agency of feelings, passions," "expressing subjection or dependence," "subordinate", "subject to;" [with accusative] "towards" and "under" (to express motion), "under" (without a sense of motion), "subjection", "control", "dependence," of Time, "in the course of", "during", "about," as an adverb, "under", "below," beneath, the agency or influence under which a thing is done"by", "before,' and "under," (with genitive and passive verbs of cause).

τῶν ἀνθρώπων "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

Ῥαββεί. "Rabbi" is not from any Greek word, but the Hebrew rab, which means "much", "many", "great", "strong," and "greater than."

Wordplay: 

There is a play on words here, using a verb that means "embrace" from Mat 23:6 with a noun that means "embrace" here. 

There are also two different words used in these verses that both mean "assembly" or "place of assembly", one here referring to a marketplace and other in the prior verse, Mat 23:6 to a meeting hall. 

Related Verses: