Luke 14:26 If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

If someone shows up before me and he doesn't really hate that father of his self, and that mother, and that spouse and those children and those brothers and those sisters besides, nay, more: that self of himself. He doesn't really have the power to be my student. 

KJV : 

Luke 14:26 If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is a stronger restatement of Matthew 10:37. The Greek terms for "love" and "hate" are less absolute than the English words. The Greek words are used more for relative comparison among things. However, what is lost in translation is the key feature of this litany, the accenting of the "self" both at the end as well as its mention at the beginning. A keyword referring to "self" is left out of this translation.  This verse does not condemn relationships as much as it condemns self-centered relationships. Another odd, hidden feature is that the negative used is the objective negative rather than the subjective one that we would expect with a verb like "hate" that describes an opinion or feeling. 

The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

The word translated as "any man" means primarily "anything" or "anyone." It uses the same form for both sexes and a different one for objects, so "anyone" works best here. 

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. 

The word translated as "to" means "towards", "in front", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also."  It is repeated a lot here, first connecting the two versions (
comes" and "not hate") and then connecting all the objects hated. There is no need to repeat mentions of it except in its last instance. 

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

 "Hated" is a Greek verb meaning "to hate." It has no shades of meaning, but it is more of an expression of dislike as we say "I hate apargus" rather than a strong emotional statement. 

The "his" here is a keyword. It is usually translated as "himself" because it is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. It is not the simpler much more common word that means "his". 

"Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own Father, though it can mean any male ancestor. When referring to others, Christ uses it to refer to their ancestors, that is, "forefathers."

"Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

The word translated as "wife" is  the Greek word that means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." It is closer to our "female."  Jesus leaves this out of similar litanies of family members elsewhere in the Gospels. 

The word translated as "children" means "child" but in the most general sense of "offspring." Christ does not use it to refer specifically to children under seven, which is another term. See this article more about these words for "child."

The word translated as "brother" means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

The word translated as "sister" is the female form of the word that means a biological brother, any kinsmen, and more broadly and friend or associate.

The word translated as "yea" means  "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree).  

A keyword is left untranslated here. The word is a particle that is used with the conjunction "and" in a special way with the adverb above. The sense of this construction is to emphasize the final "and" meaning something like "beside, nay more". In this case, emphasizing the word translated as "life". 

Again, the "his" here is the same keyword as above. It is usually translated as "himself" because it is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on. It is not the simpler much more common word that means "his". 

The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek, familiar in English, meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to specifically mean our identity in our worldly life, the role we play on earth, what we commonly call our "ego", not the soul that lives after death. See this article for detail about this word and related words. 

The word translated as "he can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something.  In Greek, this word means having an ability or power.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence captures the same idea.

The verb "be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. It form is the infinitive, "to be". 

"My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". It appears here before the noun without an article. 

"Disciple" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Εἴ (conj) "If" is ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions. 

τις (pron sg masc/fem nom) "Any man" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what." -- The Greek word translated as "some" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." When referring to a person it is a general reference as we would use the phrase "so and so". 

ἔρχεται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Come" is erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place. --

πρός (prep) "To" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before."

με (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."  

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. --

μισεῖ  (verb 3rd sg imperf/pres ind act ) "Hate" is miseo, which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated." 

τὸν πατέρα (noun sg masc acc) "The Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." --

ἑαυτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos. 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." 

τὴν μητέρα (noun sg fem acc) "Mother" is mêtêr (meter), which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τὴν γυναῖκα (noun sg fem acc) "Wife" is gyne, which means "woman (as opposed to man)", "wife", "spouse", "mortal woman (as opposed to a goddess)," and "female mate (among animals)." -- 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τὰ τέκνα (noun pl neut nom) "Children" is teknon, which means "that which is born", "child," and "the young." 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τοὺς ἀδελφοὺς (noun pl masc acc) "Brethren" is adelphos, which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

τὰς ἀδελφάς, (noun pl fem acc) "Sisters" is adelphos, which means "son of the same mother", "kinsman", "colleague", "associate," and "brother." 

ἔτι (adv) "Yea" is eti, which means "yet" and "still" (with the Present), "already" (with the Past), "yet" and "longer" (with the Future), "no longer" (with a negative), and"still" and "besides" (of degree). 

τε (partic) This particle can be used as a conjunction "and", "more", or "both". It is used with kai when the items joined should be compared or contrasted rather than simply joined.  With the adverb it has the specific meaning of "beside, nay more". 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὴν ψυχὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Life" is psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul." --

ἑαυτοῦ, (adj sg masc gen) "His" is heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself" "themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos. -- "Himself" is a special reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself," and so on.

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

δύναται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "He can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough." 

εἶναί (verb pres inf act) "Be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") --

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

μαθητής. (noun sg masc nom) "Disciple" is from mathetes, which means "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." 

Front Page Date: 

Jun 29 2018