Matthew 13:30 Let both grow together

KJV Verse: 

Mat 13:30 Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Leave both [false wheat and wheat] to john themselves together to increase until the reaping: and at the critical time of the reaping. I will say to the reapers: First pick out the false wheat and tie them up in handfuls in order to burn them out: but bring together the wheat into my storehouse.

Hidden Meaning: 

There is a hidden sense here of the false being separated out and the true being brought together.

The word translated as "let" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

The word translated as "both" means "both sides" and "both ways" as well as "both together." It is chosen because unlike the common word for "both," it implies two different ways or sides together.

The word translated as "grow together" is a verb that means literally "to make grow with," but with the sense of being together helps both grow. This verb is in a form where the subject affects themself: so that they may join in growing each other. This term is used to describe situations where you intentionally raise two things together to get the result that you want.

The word translated as "until" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

"Harvest" is from a noun which means "mowing", "reaping", "harvest time", "harvest," and "crop." In John 4:35, Christ uses this term to refer to the gathering of the fruits for eternal life.

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

The word translated as "the time" is the concept of time as a moment as opposed to a measurement. The ideas of good times or bad times as a part from seconds, minutes, and hours.

"I will say" is from the most common means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming.

The word translated as "to the reapers" is a noun related to the word for "harvest" used above. Both are forms of the noun that means "to reap", "to mow," and "to harvest."

Though you cannot tell from the English, two different words are used for "gather" in describing collecting the weeds and the wheat.

The term used for gathering the weeds specifically means collecting something for use. The word means a selective choosing rather than an indiscriminate gathering. However, it is in the form of an adjective or a noun that is the subject of the sentence, "the gathering."

The term translated as "tares" is from a weed that grows among wheat crops, a kind of imitation wheat, that had black kernels instead of real wheat when it mature. It comes from a Sumerian word for "wheat."

The word for "into" appears in some manuscripts but not others.

The word translated as "bundles" also means "packages" and "handfuls."

The word translated as "to" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against."

"To burn" is from a verb which literally means "burn through out" and is generally used to mean "to burn completely" or "burn out."

The term used for gathering wheat is from a verb that literally means "to take with," and is used to mean "to gather together", "to draw together," and "to unite." It has many different uses, but it does not specifically mean gathering in the crops.

"Barn" is from a word that means "storehouse" and other storage places including "burial place."

In this article about Christ's explanation of thisother parable, Christ may be describing using these weeds as fuel for the fires that make bread. this is strongly implied by the word chosen for "gathering," which has the sense of picking out something for a purpose. If Christ didn't see the value in the weeds as fuel, he wouldn't gather them first and bind into bundles. He would gather the wheat and burn the weeds left in the fields. If John 4:35 is a guide, the false and the true here on not just people, but what they produce in the lives, the fruit of their life in this world.

If we look at this verse and the last verse more closely, Christ seems to go even further suggesting that the false and the true are intentionally raised together so that they may be more productive (Mat 13:29), and that in the end, the false are productive by providing the "fire" to make the true into a finish product, the bread."

Wordplay: 

The word for "bind" also means "to hinder."

The word translated as "gather" for the false wheat means "to pick out" with the sense of separation.

The word translated as "gather" for the wheat has the sense of bringing together. 

Vocabulary: 

ἄφετε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "I leave" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

συναυξάνεσθαι (verb pres inf mp) The word translated as "grow together" is sunauxanô, which means "increase or enlarge along with or together", "join or assist in increasing", "join in exaggerating," and, in the passive, "increase with or together", "wax larger together with," and literally "to make grow with." This term is used to describe situations where you intentionally raise two things together to get the result that you want.

ἀμφότερα (adj pl neut acc) "Both" is from amphoteroi, which means "either", "both of two", "both together", "towards both sides", "both ways", "on both sides," and "all together."

ἕως "Until" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that."

τοῦ θερισμοῦ:(noun sg masc gen) "Harvest" is from therismos, which means "mowing", "reaping", "harvest time", "harvest," and "crop."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -

καιρῷ (noun sg masc dat) "The time" is from kairos, which means "due measure", "proportion", "fitness", "exact time", "season", "opportunity", "time", "critical times", "advantage," and "profit."

τοῦ θερισμοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Harvest" is from therismos, which means "mowing", "reaping", "harvest time", "harvest," and "crop."

ἐρῶ (verb 1st sg fut ind act ) "I will say" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

τοῖς θερισταῖς (noun pl masc dat) "To the reapers" is from theristes, which means "a reaper," and "harvester."

Συλλέξατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Gather ye together" is from sullego, a term meaning "gather", "collect", "come together", "collect", "get together [people]", "compose", "compile", "scrape together", "compile a list of," (in middle passive) "collect for oneself", "for one's own use," and (in passive) "come together", "become customary", "come together", "assemble."

πρῶτον (adj sg neut nom) "First" is from protos. In place, this means "the foremost." Of time, it means "the initial." In order, it means "the first." In math, it means the prime numbers. Of rank or degree, it means "the highest" or "the best." -

τὰ ζιζάνια (noun pl neut nom/acc) The term translated as "tares" is zizanion, which was a weed that grows in wheat, a kind of imitation wheat, that had black kernels instead of real wheat when it mature. It comes from a Sumerian word for "wheat."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

δήσατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Bind" is deo which means "to bind", "to keep in bonds", "to tie", "to hinder from," and "to fetter. "

αὐτὰ (adj pl neut acc) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

[εἰς] "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place), ""up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." -

δέσμας (noun pl fem acc) "Bundles" is from desme, which means "package", "bundle", "handfuls," and was an Egyptian "measure."

πρὸς "To" is from pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards ""before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." --

τὸ κατακαῦσαι (verb aor inf act) "To burn" is from katakaiô, which literally means "burn through out" and is generally used to mean "to burn completely," of the fingers, "to be burnt (with hot food)", of hot winds, "parch," and, in the passive, of fire, "burn down," and "burn out."

αὐτά, (adj pl neut acc) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of ones own accord."

τὸν"The" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun but here is separated by the conjunction below.

δὲ "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

σῖτον "Wheat" is from sitos (sitos), which means "grain", "wheat", "barley", "food made from grain", "bread," and, most generally, "food."

συνάγετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Gather" is from synago, which means "bring together", "gather together, ""pit [two warriors against each other]", "join in one", "unite", "make friends of", "lead with one", "receive", "reconcile", "draw together", "narrow", "contract", "conclude [from premises]", " infer," and "prove."

εἰς "Into" is from eis, which means "into (of place), ""up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν ἀποθήκην "Barn" is from apotheke, which means "any place wherein to lay up a thing", "magazine", "storehouse", "burial-place", "refuge", "anything laid by", "store," and "store of favor."

μου.

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