Matthew 6:31 Therefore do not worry

KJV Verse: 

Mat 6:31 Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

You don't want to worry, repeating: What might we eat? What might we drink? What might we put ourselves?

Hidden Meaning: 

This verse repeats the plays on word from Mat 6:25

The Greek word translated either as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative. either works here, but the "really" seems to make difference between real and false charity here.

"Take...thought" is a Greek verb that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English.

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

"Saying" is from the Greek word Christ uses frequently in the repeated statement, "Truly, I say unto you" (KJV), which is translated alternatively as "I teach you reality." The concept of the word is that something isn't just said once, but repeatedly so it is "teaching" or, as here, "repeating."

The Greek word translated as "what" generally means "anything", "something," or "anyone." However, it in a question it means "what", "which", "who", etc. It is used the same in each of the repeated phrases here.

The word translated as "shall we eat" means "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up," which is a play with the "worry" concept here. ," as we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier. Though the verb is translated as the future, it is not the future tense. Since the context is worrying, the time frame is some point the future. It is also in a form indicating something that "might" happen.

The word translated as "To drink" seems chosen for its double meaning as well. It means "to celebrate." As with the "eat" above, the word seems chosen for its double meaning since "to celebrate," the opposite of "to fret." Though the verb is translated as the future, it is not the future tense.

The word translated as "shall we be clothed" means "to throw around" or "to expand" or "excel." Unlike the other verbs here, it is in a form that indicates someone doing something to themselves. Notice that Christ does not use the "wearing" verb from the previous verse, Mat 6:30, which is clearly about clothing, but the one from Mat 6:29, that clearly has a double meaning. However, like the other two words, is has a double meaning. It more generally means "get into" or "undertake".

 

 

Wordplay: 

 The Greek words translated as "eat and drink" also mean "to fret and celebrate." 

The word translated as "shall put on" also means "get into" or "undertake." 

The Spoken Version: 

“You all,” he continued playfully, “don’t want to worry, saying.” His voice whined, “‘What do we eat? What do we drink? What do we put on ourselves?’”

Vocabulary: 

μὴ (partic) "No" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

οὖν (adv) "Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore." --

μεριμνήσητε (2nd pl fut ind act) "Take thought" is from merimanao , which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares," and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]."

λέγοντες (part pl pres act masc nom) "Saying" is from lego, which means "to recount", "to tell over", "to say", "to speak", "to teach", "to mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," nominate," and "command." Another Greek word spelled the same means "to pick up", "to choose for oneself", "to pick out," and "to count."

Τί (irreg sg neut nom/acc) "What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

φάγωμεν; (1st pl aor subj act) "Shall we eat" is from esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion.

(conj) "Or" is from e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

Τί (irreg sg neut nom/acc) "What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

πίωμεν; (1st pl aor subj act) "Shall we drink" is from pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

(conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

Τί (irreg sg neut nom/acc) "What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

περιβαλώμεθα; (1st pl aor subj mid) "Shall we be clothed" is from periballo, which means "to throw around", "to put on", "to encompass", "to surround", "to bring under one's power", "amplify", "expand", "appropriate mentally", "comprehend", "to excel", "to surpass", "throw beyond," and "beat in throwing." In the passive, it means "to have put around oneself." "to be involved in," and "to have come into possession of one."

Related Verses: 

Mar 20 2017

evidence: 

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