Matthew 6:25 ...Take no thought for your life,

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

The Sermon on the Mount, the choice between the temporary and  the permanent.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

By this, I teach you: Don't worry, for that ego of yours, anything you might eat [or drink]. And not for that body yours: anything you might cover yourself. Certainly not! The physical being is a greater thing than meat. And the body is a covering.

KJV : 

Matthew 6:25 Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse centers around two words, "life" and "body" meant something different in Christ's time than  our own. They are closer to our sense to "ego" and "physical being." While one is hidden and the other visible, both are temporary. These ideas are discussed in conjunction with related ideas in this article about the way Jesus describes aspects of human life. The words here are singular, but the "of yours" describing them are plural so the "life" and "body" are conceptual, the nature we all have in common.

The words chosen as "eat" and "drink" also have the sense of "to fret" and "to celebrate." While there are no common alternatives to "drink" Jesus often used another word for "eat" that doesn't have this sense of "fret."

The verb "put on" and the noun "raiment" are from the same root. The word translated as "put on" means "get into". It does not refer to clothing specifically and it not used exclusively that way be Jesus. In English, the equivelant to these words would be "cover" and "covering."

NIV : 

Matthew 6:25  Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?

Wordplay: 

 The Greek words translated as "eat and drink" also mean "to fret and celebrate." 

The word translated as "shall put on" also means "get into" or "undertake." 

The verb "put on" and the noun "raiment" are from the same root.

My Takeaway: 

Our earth identity and physical being are like food and clothing.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Διὰ (prep ) "Therefore" is from dia (with touto below) which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

τοῦτο (adj sg neut acc) "Therefore" is from touto, (with dia above) which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]."

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is from lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is from humas and humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

μὴ (partic) "No" is from me, which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

μεριμνᾶτε [6 verses](2nd pl pres imperat act) "Take...thought" is merimanao which means to "care for", "be anxious about", "meditate upon", "to be cumbered with many cares,"and "to be treated with anxious care [passive]."

τῇ (article sg fem dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ψυχῇ (noun sg fem dat) "Life" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul."

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

τί (irreg) "What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

φάγητε (2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall eat" is from esthio, which means "to eat", "devour", "fret", "vex," and to "take in one's mouth." It is also a metaphor for decay and erosion.

[ (conj) "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than."

τίπίητε], (2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall drink" is from pino, which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

μηδὲ (partic) "Nor yet for" is from mede, which means "and not", "but not", "nor," and "not."

τῷ (article sg neut dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

σώματι (noun sg neut dat) "Body" is soma, which means "body", "dead body", "the living body", "animal body", "person", "human being", "any corporeal substance", "metallic substance", "figure of three dimensions [math]", "solid", "whole [of a thing]", "frame [of a thing]", "the body of the proof", "a body of writings." and "text of a document." It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind." It is the physical substance of things, the body of men and animals or of heavenly bodies or groups of people.

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, which is a plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

τί (irreg) "What" is from tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

ἐνδύσησθε: [6 verses](2nd pl aor subj mid) "Put on" is from endyo, which means to "go into", "put on [clothes]", "enter", "press into", "sink in", "enter upon it", "undertake it," and "insinuate oneself into."

οὐχὶ (adv) "Not" is from ouchi, an adverb which means "no", "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," "notwithstanding", "yet", "still", "never yet", "for not", "indeed", "for surely not", "no,—certainly not", "for I don't suppose," and "for in no manner."

(article sg fem nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").  -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

ψυχὴ (noun sg fem nom) "Life" is from psyche, which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul.

"πλεῖόν (adj sg neut nom ) "More" is from pleiôn, which means "more [of number, size, extent]", "longer [of time]," "greater than," "further than," (with an article) "the greater number", "the mass or crowd", "the greater part", "the advantage. As an adverb, "more," or "rather."

"ἐστι (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

τῆς (article sg fem gen )  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

τροφῆς (noun sg fem gen ) "Meat" is from trophe, which means "nourishment", "food", "that which provides sustenance", "provisions", "nurture", "rearing," and "education." It is one of two words Christ uses that are translated as "meat". This word means food that takes care of people's needs.

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τὸ (article sg neut nom ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

σῶμα (noun sg neut nom ) "Body" is soma, which means "body", "dead body", "the living body", "animal body", "person", "human being", "any corporeal substance", "metallic substance", "figure of three dimensions [math]", "solid", "whole [of a thing]", "frame [of a thing]", "the body of the proof", "a body of writings." and "text of a document." It is the opposite of "spirit" or "mind".

τοῦ (article s sg neut gen )  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").

ἐνδύματος; [5 verses[(noun sg neut gen ) "Raiment" is endyma, which means "garment," and "covering."

KJV Analysis: 

Therefore -- (WW) The words translated as "therefore" are not the common Greek word usually translated as "therefore" but two words, meaning "through this" or "by this" referring to the previous verse, Mat 6:24.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

say -- The word translated as  "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Jesus usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

unto -- This word "unto" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object,

you, -- "You" is the plural forms second person pronoun, "you." This is a change from the last several verses that addressed a single person using the singular you, in both verbs and pronouns. 00

Take "Take," with the word "thought" below,  is a Greek verb that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. It is plural and in the form of a command.

no  --The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

thought -- This noun completes the idea of the verb, but there is no separate noun in the Greek.

for -- This word "from" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use.  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on" depending on the context.

your -- The "your" here is plural, but the word it modifies in the singular. This means that the following word cannot refer to individual lives, but to the general concept of life.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life, -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek, familiar in English, meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." It is not the common word that Jesus use to mean "life," which has the same root as the verb "to live."  Jesus uses this word to specifically mean our identity in our worldly life, the role we play on earth, what we commonly call our "ego", not the soul that lives after death nor the physical life of the body. Its sense is our earthly lives and identity. See this article for detail about this word and related words. 

what -- There word translated as "what" means "anything" or "anyone." But it can act as "what" in a question, which is often how Christ uses it.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

eat,  - The word translated as "eat" has several issues. First, it does mean "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier. Second, it is not in the future tense, but a tense meaning something that happens at a specific point in time.  It is also in a form indicating something that "might" happen. Again, this verb is plural.

or  - "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

what -- This English objective pronoun is added and not in the Greek source.   In Greek, pronoun objects are not repeated after each verb because they are implied by their first occurrence.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

drink;  -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate." "To drink" also means "to celebrate," the opposite of "to fret." But unlike "eat" there is no other word Jesus uses for "drink." The form is the same as the word above, something that might happen at some time. It again is plural.

nor -- The word for "nor" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

yet  -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "yet" in the Greek source.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use.  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on" depending on the context.

your -- The "your" here is plural, but the word it modifies in the singular. This means that the following word cannot refer to individual lives, but to the general concept of life.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

body, -- The Greek word translated as "body" means a physical body, either living or dead. It also refers to material existence generally, which is its use here since it is referred to as something shared by all those in the audience. It is also in the form of an indirect object, as a counterpart to "mind" above. However, here the indirect object describing a benefit. This word is often used in with the word translated here as "life". The reason is explained in the aforementioned article. Again, this word is singular, despite the plural "your".

what -- There word translated as "what" means "anything" or "anyone." But it can act as "what" in a question, which is often how Christ uses it.

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

shall -- (CW) This helping verb "shall" does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

put on.  - The word translated as "put on" means "go into", "put on [clothes]", "enter", "press into",  and so on. However, like the other two words, it has a double meaning. It more generally means "get into" but, since it is from the same root as the noun translated as "covering," the verb "to cover" works as well. Especially since this verbs form is the middle voice which indicates the subject is acting on himself, so "cover yourself."

Is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -

not -- (CW) The word translated as "not" means "certainly not" and "I don't suppose." It is not ne of the two common Greek negatives by a more exaggerated version of one the form that describes what someone thinks or wants.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

life  - (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek, familiar in English, meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to specifically mean our identity in our worldly life, the role we play on earth, what we commonly call our "ego", not the soul that lives after death nor the physical life of the body.  Its sense is our earthly lives and identity. See this article for detail about this word and related words. 

more  -- The Greek word translated as "more" is an adjective that means "more," "greater,"  and a "higher degree."  It also is a comparative form. However, its gender doesn't  match any of the nouns "life," "body," or "meat," in this part of the verse. This neutral is a special usage that means "a higher degree" or "higher thing."

than -- This word "than"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English, here, the "than" (in comparisons). 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

meat,  - The word translated as "meat" also means "nourishment", "nurture," and "education." Christ uses this word to describe the food that takes care of people's needs, so "nourishment" comes close in English.

and  - The word translated as "and" also means "also" or "even."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

body -- The Greek word translated as "body" means a physical body, either living or dead. It also refers to material existence generally, which is its use here since it is referred to as something shared by all those in the audience. It is also in the form of an indirect object, as a counterpart to "mind" above. However, here the indirect object describing a benefit. This word is often used in with the word translated here as "life". The reason is explained in the aforementioned article. Again, this word is singular, despite the plural "your".

than -- (CW) This word "than"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  While a "than" works after a comparative, here the is no comparative before it here. Since the following word is in the form of a subject, the verb "to be" can be assumed here. In that case "which is" works as a translation of this word form. 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

raiment? -- The word translated as "raiment" means "clothing" or "covering." It is in the possessive from so "of clothing" or "of covering." It is from the same root as the verb commonly translated as "put on" when referring to clothing.

KJV Translation Issues: 

13
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "therefore" should be "Through/by this."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "life" is more like "ego" or "earthly position."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" before "eat" does not mean the future tense.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" before "drink" does not mean the future tense.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "yet" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "body" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "shall" before "put on" does not mean the future tense.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" means "certainly not."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "life" is more like "ego" or "earthly position."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "meat" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "than" most liklehy means "which is" in the context.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "raiment" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

Therefore -- (WW) The words translated as "therefore" are not the common Greek word usually translated as "therefore" but two words, meaning "through this" or "by this" referring to the previous verse, Mat 6:24.

I -- This is from the first-person, singular form of the verb.

tell -- The word translated as  "say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Jesus usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

you, -- "You" is the plural forms second person pronoun, "you." This is a change from the last several verses that addressed a single person using the singular you, in both verbs and pronouns.

do -- This helping verb is used to create commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English, but the Greek could be either a question or a statement.

not  --The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done. If it wasn't done, the objective negative of fact would be used. More about the Greek negative in this article.

worry  - "Worry,"  is a Greek verb that means "to care for", "be anxious about," and "to meditate upon." It has most of the sense of the way we use "worry" in English. It is plural and in the form of a command.

about -- This word "about " comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use:  the "about" works best here.

your -- The "your" here is plural, but the word it modifies in the singular. This means that the following word cannot refer to individual lives, but to the general concept of life.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

life, -- (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek, familiar in English, meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." It is not the common word that Jesus use to mean "life," which has the same root as the verb "to live."  Jesus uses this word to specifically mean our identity in our worldly life, the role we play on earth, what we commonly call our "ego", not the soul that lives after death nor the physical life of the body. Its sense is our earthly lives and identity. See this article for detail about this word and related words. 

what -- There word translated as "what" means "anything" or "anyone." But it can act as "what" in a question, which is often how Christ uses it.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- (WW) This helping verb "will " does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

eat,  - The word translated as "eat" has several issues. First, it does mean "eat" but it also means "fret," as we say "something is eating me up," which seems to go better with the "worry" concept earlier. Second, it is not in the future tense, but a tense meaning something that happens at a specific point in time.  It is also in a form indicating something that "might" happen. Again, this verb is plural.

or  - "Or" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison.

drink;  -- The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate." "To drink" also means "to celebrate," the opposite of "to fret." But unlike "eat" there is no other word Jesus uses for "drink." The form is the same as the word above, something that might happen at some time. It again is plural.

or -- The word for "or" is the Greek subjective negative plus the Greek word for "but."

about -- This word "about " comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use.  a  "to,"  "with,"  "in,"   "of,"  "as," "by," "for," "at" or "on" depending on the context.

your -- The "your" here is plural, but the word it modifies in the singular. This means that the following word cannot refer to individual lives, but to the general concept of life.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

body, -- The Greek word translated as "body" means a physical body, either living or dead. It also refers to material existence generally, which is its use here since it is referred to as something shared by all those in the audience. It is also in the form of an indirect object, as a counterpart to "mind" above. However, here the indirect object describing a benefit. This word is often used in with the word translated here as "life". The reason is explained in the aforementioned article. Again, this word is singular, despite the plural "your".

what -- There word translated as "what" means "anything" or "anyone." But it can act as "what" in a question, which is often how Christ uses it.

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

will -- (WW) This helping verb "will " does not indicate the future tense, but that the verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more appropriate, but is assumed in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

wear  - (WW) The word translated as "wear" means "go into", "put on [clothes]", "enter", "press into",  and so on. It doesn't mean the wearing of clothes, but the act of putting them on. The form is the middle voice which indicates the subject is acting on himself, but that is assumed from the context.

Is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics. -

not -- (CW) The word translated as "not" means "certainly not" and "I don't suppose." It is not ne of the two common Greek negatives by a more exaggerated version of one the form that describes what someone thinks or wants.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

life  - (CW) The word translated here as "life" is psyche, a common word in Greek, familiar in English, meaning "life", "soul", "consciousness," and "a sense of self." Jesus uses it to specifically mean our identity in our worldly life, the role we play on earth, what we commonly call our "ego", not the soul that lives after death nor the physical life of the body.  Its sense is our earthly lives and identity. See this article for detail about this word and related words. 

more  -- The Greek word translated as "more" is an adjective that means "more," "greater,"  and a "higher degree."  It also is a comparative form. However, its gender doesn't  match any of the nouns "life," "body," or "meat," in this part of the verse. This neutral is a special usage that means "a higher degree" or "higher thing." This adjective comes before the verb ("is") so thsi comparative adjective is oddly separated from thing to which it is compared.

than -- This word "than"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English, here, the "than" (in comparisons). 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

food,  - The word translated as "food" also means "nourishment", "nurture," and "education." Christ uses this word to describe the food that takes care of people's needs, so "nourishment" comes close in English.

and  - The word translated as "and" also means "also" or "even."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

body -- The Greek word translated as "body" means a physical body, either living or dead. It also refers to material existence generally, which is its use here since it is referred to as something shared by all those in the audience. It is also in the form of an indirect object, as a counterpart to "mind" above. However, here the indirect object describing a benefit. This word is often used in with the word translated here as "life". The reason is explained in the aforementioned article. Again, this word is singular, despite the plural "your".

more -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "more" in the Greek source. The fact the the adjective is not repeated is important.

than -- (CW) This word "than"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  While a "than" works after a comparative, here the is no comparative before it here. Since the following word is in the form of a subject, the verb "to be" can be assumed here. In that case "which is" works as a translation of this word form. 

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

raiment? -- The word translated as "raiment" means "clothing" or "covering." It is in the possessive from so "of clothing" or "of covering."

NIV Translation Issues: 

14
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "therefore" should be "Through/by this."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "life" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "life" is more like "ego" or "earthly position."
  • WW - Confusing Word -- The "will" before "eat" should be "should" or "might."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "yet" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "body" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Confusing Word -- The "will" before "eat" should be "should" or "might."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "wear" should be "put on."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "not" means "certainly not."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "life" is more like "ego" or "earthly position."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "meat" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "more" doesn't exist in the source here.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The word translated as "than" most likely means "which is" in the context.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "raiment" is not shown in the English translation.

The Spoken Version: 

“We have to eat!” Cried one.
“We have to drink!” Shouted another who sounded a little drunk.
“We cannot go naked!” A third squawked.
“By this, I’m telling you all,” the speaker explained seriously. “Don’t worry about that self of yours. What you might put in your mouth?” He touched his lips. “Or drink?” He pretended to lift a cup. “And nor for that body of yours.” He patted his chest. “What you might put on.” He pretended to wrap a robe around himself. “Certainly not! This self is more than food. And the body? A covering!

evidence: 

72.00

Front Page Date: 

Jun 17 2020