John 10:16 And other sheep I have,

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 10:16 And other sheep I have, which are not of this fold: them also I must bring, and they shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold, and one shepherd.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

I also keep different flocks. It is not these from this court. There is need for me to lead those also. They might hear my voice and become a single one-leader people.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In the alternative translated, we use the more metaphorical meaning of the words, as we have in this section.

In the KJV, you might think that the two words translated as "fold" were the same Greek word, but they are actually two different words, aule and poimne. The former is the "sheepfold" referred to in Jhn 10:1 more generally meaning a "courtyard". The later is a word meaning "flock" from the same base the Greek word translated as "shepherd' (poimen). It's metaphorically means a group of people.

The relationship between poimne (flock) and poimen (shepherd) since they sit side by side without the connecting "and" between them that is shown in the KJV. In this form, the later noun takes on the feeling of an adjective, modifying the first, hence, a "single one-leader people" or "one-shepherd flock" if you prefer.

We also break this verse down into separate sentences to better reflect the original Greek. In English translation, many of Christ's statements appear as long complex sentence. This isn't how they read in Greek where the separate phrases stand better on their own. This is often the choice of the KJV translators (and often even more modern ones as well) who seem to prefer more complex sentences. 

Here, we see a couple examples of how this happens. 

For example, the Greek word hos is translated here as "which." In English, "which" starts a subordinate clause in a complex sentence. However, in Greek, the word is a simple demonstrative pronoun, in this case, "these" or "those." It is not the subject of this sentence. The verb is singular "he/she/it is." If we treat is that way, "it" creates a separate sentence where the "it" refers to the keeping of other flocks generally.

Much more commonly is the translated of the Greek word kai as the conjunction "and" connecting two phrases into a complex sentence. However, in Greek, kai plays a lot of different roles, adding emphasis as well as adding an additional phrase. Often, kai is best translated as "also" as we do here.

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἄλλα "Other" is from allos (allos), which means "another", "one besides", "off another sort", "different", "other than what is true", "other than what is right," [with an article] "the rest", "all besides," and [in series] "one...another."

πρόβατα "Sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks."

ἔχω (1st sg pres ind act) "I have" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

"Which" is from hos (hos), which is the demonstrative pronoun in its various forms (hê, ho, gen. hou, hês, hou, etc. ; dat. pl. hois, hais, hois, etc. gen. hoou). It means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἔστιν ( 3rd sg pres ind act) "Are" is from eimi (eimi), which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῆς αὐλῆς "Fold" is from aule, which means "courtyard", "coourt", "housing for domesticated animals", "central courtyard of a house," generally, "dwelling", "abode", "chamber."

ταύτης: "This" is from tauta, which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

κἀκεῖνα "Them also" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

δεῖ (3rd sg imperf ind act) "Must" is from, dei (dei), which means "needful," and "there is need."

με "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

ἀγαγεῖν, (aor inf act attic epic) "Bring" is from agô (ago), which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight."'

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τῆς φωνῆς "Voice" is from phone, which means "sound", "tone", "sound of a voice", "speech", "voice", "utterance", "cry" [of animals], "sounds" [of inanimate objects], "faculty of speech", "phrase", "saying", "rumor," and "report."

μου "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

ἀκούσουσιν, (3rd pl aor subj act) "They shall hear" is from akouô (akouo), which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

γενήσονται ” 3rd pl fut ind mid) "There shall be" is from gignomai (ginomai), which means "to become", "to come into being", "to be produced," and "to be."

μία "One" is from heis (heis), which means "one", "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen. The form here is mia, feminine singular.

ποίμνη, "Flock" is from poimnê (poimne), which means "flock" specifically of sheep and a metaphor for "persons."

εἷς "One" is from heis (heis), which means "one", "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.

ποιμήν. "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

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