John 10:28 And I give unto them eternal life;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I also grant to them continued existence. Not only are they are never ever cease to exist, but also nothing will ever get them from my hold. >

KJV : 

Jhn 10:28 And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek word translated as "eternal life" more literally means "a life lasting for an age" or "life-long living." As you can see, the idea of "continued existence" works extremely well here since in the next verse, Christ says that he means that they will continue to exist.

The Greek word translated as "perish," when it is an active verb, means "to destroy utterly." When it is a passive verb, it means "to be destroyed utterly. However, this form of the verb is neither. It is a "mid-passive" form with is midway where the subject is both the actor and the one who is acted upon. Our phrase "cease to exist" captures this feeling better than other choices.

The word for "man" doesn't appear in the Greek. The Greek word used is more general, meaning "anything" and, in the negative as used here, "nothing."

Finally, the word translated as "hand" has a wide variety of meanings, as does the English word, but it also means one's "grasp" and "hold." In English, we say "unhand me" to mean "let me go."

Greek Vocabulary: 

κἀγὼ "And...I" is from kago, a contraction of kai ego. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

δίδωμι (1st sg pres ind act) "Give" is from didômi (didomi), which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

αὐτοῖς "Them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ζωὴν "Life" is from zôê (zoe), which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον "Eternal" is from aiônios (aionios), which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

καὶ "Never" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐ "Never" is from οὐ ou (with me below)which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

μὴ "Not" is from (me) (with ou above), which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἀπόλωνται (3rd pl aor subj mid) "They shall... perish" is from apollumi (apollymi), which means "to demolish", "to lay waste", "to lose", "to perish", "to die", "to cease to exist," and "to be undone."

εἰς Untranslated is eis (eis), which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸν αἰῶνα, Untranslated is aion (aion), which means "life", "lifetime", "age," or "generation."

καὶ "Neither" is from kai (with ou below), which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐχ "Neither" is from οὐ ou (with kai below)which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἁρπάσει (3rd sg fut ind act) "Pluck" is from harpazō which means which means "to snatch away", "to carry off", "to be a robber", "to seize hastily", "to grasp with the senses", "to captivate", "to ravish," and "to plunder."

τις "Any man" is from tis (tis) which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "many a one", "whoever," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

αὐτὰ "Them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐκ "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῆς χειρός .Hand" is from cheir (cheir) which means "the hand and arm," and "with the help of agency of another." Like "hand" in English, it has a lot of meanings including "an act or deed", "a body of people," and the measurement "handful."

μου"My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."