John 10:38 But if I do, though ye believe not me,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

If, however, I perform even if you don't trust in me, trust the deeds so that you might have perceived and might perceive, seeing the Father in me and I in the Father.

KJV : 

Jhn 10:38 But if I do, though ye believe not me, believe the works: that ye may know, and believe, that the Father is in me, and I in him.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first phase here is very clear in the Greek. It states that Christ performs his deeds even if his opponents do not believe in him. Faith, at least on the part of his critics, was not a necessary condition for seeing the deeds that he accomplish.

In the KJV, the next key phrase "see and believe" comes from a different Greek source than we use today. In today's source, the Greek verb at both sides of the "and" are the same, ginosko, which means "learn to know" and "perceive."

Most modern Bibles translates this phrase as "know and understand," contrasting two meanings of the word is misleading. It hides the real difference in the two verbs, which is of tense. The first occurrence is in the aorist tense which is usually translated as the English past tense. The second occurrence, after the "and" (kai) is in the present tense.

The idea is that if they had just trusted the deeds, they could have perceived something in the past and could perceive it know. The fact that they did't trust the deeds, that is, trust what they saw, created the problem in the past and in the present.

In the final phrase, the KJV adds the word "is" (The Father is in me...). This is indicated by the italics. This captures the idea, but the verb "to be" isn't in the original, though Christ uses it elsewhere in similar statements. In English the verb is necessary because without it, the phrase after the conjunction "that" (hoti) would seem incomplete. However, it seems that the conjunction was used because of its sense of "seeing that" especially after the verb "ginosko" which has the sense of "seeing" as well.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

εἰ "If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

δὲ "But" is from de (de), which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ποιῶ, (1st sg pres ind act) "I do" is from poieô ( poieo), which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

κἂν (conj) "Though" is from kan, which means "and if", "even if," and "although." It is a contraction of kai an. Kai is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." aAn, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "possibly," "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἐμοὶ "Me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

μὴ "Not" is from (me), which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

πιστεύητε 2nd pl pres subj act) "Ye believe" is from pisteuô (pisteuo), which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

τοῖς ἔργοις "The works" is from ergon (ergon ), which means "works", "tasks", "deeds", "actions", "thing," and "matter."

πιστεύετε, (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Believe" is from pisteuô (pisteuo), which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

ἵνα "That" is from hina (hina), which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

γνῶτε (2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye may know" is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

γινώσκητε (2nd pl pres subj act "Believe" is from gignôskô (ginosko) which means "to learn to know", "to know by reflection or observation," and "to perceive."

ὅτι "That" is from hoti (hoti), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ἐμοὶ "Me" is from moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

πατὴρ "The Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."

κἀγὼ "And...I" is from kago, a contraction of kai ego. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τῷ πατρί. "The Father" is from pater (pater), which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers."