John 17:14 I have given them thy word;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I have given them your law, and society has hated them because they are not from the social order even as I am not from the social order.

KJV : 

Jhn 17:14 I have given them thy word; and the world hath hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek term "word" has a much broader meaning than the English concept. Our modern concept of the "word of God" has taken the meaning of simply "the truth." We also have the concept of "a man's word is his bond" but in Greek, the concept of "the word" was much more connected with law, traditions, and rules of conduct than the English idea. The law was both what was written and what was proclaimed by rulers. In both cases, the words mattered. This idea is a little bit like we talk about "the letter of the law" as opposed the spirit.

In the alternative, kosmos, that is, the world order, is translated as "society" and "the social order" to try to capture the Greek concept of the word. The kosmos was the world of men, but more specifically, it referred to the world order, the social order, not natural law but the organization of human society. This order is dictated by "the-powers-that-be" in society. In our era, this would include political power, the media, and various cultural pressures.

Here, Christ sets up a clear opposition between the word of God, that is, His laws, and the rules made by the social order, the powers-that-be. Those powers included the religiously powerful, who were Christ's constant nemesis during his time on earth.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

δέδωκα (1st sg perf ind act) "Have given" is from didômi (didomi), which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

αὐτοῖς "Them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

τὸν λόγον "Word" is from logos (logos), which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value."

σου "Thy" is from sou (sou) which means "you" and "your."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κόσμος "The world" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Matthew uses it when Christ is talking about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, as it is designed to be.

ἐμίσησεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "Hath hated" is from miseô (miseo), which means "to hate" and in passive, "to be hated."

αὐτούς "Them" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ὅτι "Because" is from hoti (hoti), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that" and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what," and "wherefore." A form of hostis.

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, class="greek">μήapplies to will and thought; class="greek">οὐ denies, class="greek">μή rejects; class="greek">οὐ is absolute, class="greek">μή relative;class="greek">οὐ objective, class="greek">μή subjective.

εἰσὶν (3rd pl pres ind act) "They are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means "out of", "from", "by," and "away from."

τοῦ κόσμου "The world" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Matthew uses it when Christ is talking about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, as it is designed to be.

καθὼςclass="greek"> "Even as" is from kathos, which means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

ἐγὼ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun.

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, class="greek">μήapplies to will and thought; class="greek">οὐ denies, class="greek">μή rejects; class="greek">οὐ is absolute, class="greek">μή relative;class="greek">οὐ objective, class="greek">μή subjective.

εἰμὶ (1st sg pres ind act) "I am" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἐκ "Of" is from ek, which means "out of", "from", "by," and "away from."

τοῦ κόσμου "The world" is from kosmos, which mean "order", "good order", "ruler", "world order", "universe," and "the world of men." Matthew uses it when Christ is talking about the order in the universe, specifically the order of the world of men, as it is designed to be.