Luke 13:35 Behold, your house is left unto you desolate

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

See, it has let itself fall on you, this house of yours.  I, however, tell you, you never knew me until you might proclaim having praised the one showing himself making his way in a name of a lord. 

KJV : 

Luke 13:35 Behold, your house is left unto you desolate: and verily I say unto you, Ye shall not see me, until the time come when ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse end the chapter. It has a This verse combines Matthew 23:38 and Matthew 23:39 , shortening them a bit. 

"Behold" is from a verb/adverb meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!" In a humorous vein, this about how Christ uses this like we use the phrase "tah-dah" in a magic show, or the French, "See!"

The word translated as "house" is the word that means a "dwelling place", "room", "meeting hall", "substance," and "ruling family."  It is the word Christ uses (Mat 10:6 and Mat 15:24) to describe "the house of Israel." We can tell it means "house" because of the article that proceeds it. 

"Unto you" is a form of the second person pronoun that is usually an indirect object, but which has several other uses as well. It can be "to you", "for you", "by you", or "as you" in a comparison.

The word translated as "Is left" primarily means "to let fall", "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer", and "let" in the New Testament. It is in the present tense but the form indicates the subject is acting on itself, "leaves itself."

The Greek word translated as "and " means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". It joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.  

The word translated as "I say" is the most common word that means "to say," and "to speak," but it also means "to teach," which seems to be the way Christ uses it more frequently. It also has many ancillary meanings such as "to count" ("to number" or like we might say, "to recount" a story) or "to choose for yourself." Christ usually uses this word to refer to his own speaking or teaching.

The verb translated as "Ye shall...see" means "to see" but it is used like we use the word "see" to mean "to know" or "to perceive." It is not in the future tense, but the tense that indicates something that happens at a specific point in time past, present, or future.

The "not" here is both of the Greek negatives used together. Greek has two negatives, one objective, one subjective. The use of both together is more extreme, like saying "you cannot really think."

"Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

The word translated as "till" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

"Ye shall say" (a different Greek word from "I tell" Christ uses to describe his speaking) is from means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. It also is not in the future tense, but the tense that indicates something that happens at a specific point in time past, present, or future.

"Blessed" is from a verb that means to "speak well of", "praise". and "honor". Amusingly, this is a Hebrew euphemism for "cursed", reversing its normal meaning. This is not the word used in the Beatitudes ("Blessed are the poor..."). It is in a past passive form of an adjective, "having been honored."

There is no verb "is" appearing here in the Greek.

The word translated as "he that cometh" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." It is in a form where the subject acts on himself. It is in the form of an adjective ("making his way") introduce by an article, so "the one making his way."

The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "in one's power."

There is not "the" in front of this word, so "a name". 

The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, but has more depth. It doesn't mean the thing itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

There is no "the" before "name", so "a lord". 

The Greek word translated as "lord," means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." However, two different Hebrew words are translated as this Greek word in the OT, the name for God and another Hebrew word with a very similar meaning to this one, referring to someone in authority. 

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "house" means "house" but it also a verbal adjective that means "seeming to be true." 

Blessed also means cursed.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἰδοὺ (adv, verb 2nd sg aor imperat mid) "Behold is idou, which means "to behold", "to see," and "to perceive." It acts as an adverbial phrase in this form meaning "Lo! Behold!" and "See there!' It is a form of the verb eido, which means "to see."

ἀφίεται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp))"Is left" is from aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Unto you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

” (article sg masc nom)  Untranslated. is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. 

οἶκος (noun sg masc nom) "House" is from one of two words. The noun, (noun sg masc nom) oikos, which means "house", "dwelling place", "room", "home", "meeting hall", "household goods", "substance," and "ruling family." It is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house.

ὑμῶν”. (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is from humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

λέγω (1st sg pres ind act) "I say" is from lego means "pick up", "choose for oneself", "pick out," and "count," "recount", "tell over", "say", "speak", "teach", "mean", "boast of", "tell of", "recite," "nominate," and "command." =

[δὲ] (conj) "And" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). 

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

οὐ μή "Not" is from ou me, the two forms of Greek negative used together. Ou is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. Mê (me) is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἴδητε (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall...see" is from eido which means "to see", "to examine", "to perceive", "to behold", "to know how to do", "to see with the mind's eye," and "to know."

με (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

ἕως "Till" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that."

εἴπητε (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Ye shall say" is from eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

Εὐλογημένος (part sg perf pass nom) "Blessed" is from eulogeo, which means "speak well of", "praise". "honor", "bless", "praise" a god, by a Hebr. euphemism, "curse", and, as an adjective, "charmed", "lucky", and "blessed."

ἐρχόμενος (part sg pres mp masc nom) "Is he that cometh" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

ὀνόματι (noun sg neut dat) "Name" is from onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative.

Κυρίου. (noun sg masc gen) "Lord" is from kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family."

Front Page Date: 

Jun 10 2018