Luke 13:6 A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard;

Spoken to: 

audience

After saying that those the suffer tragedies are not worse "sinners" than others, that we are all the same, none owing more than another. And he began this analogy.

KJV: 

Luke 13:6 A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard; and he came and sought fruit thereon, and found none.

NIV : 

Luke 13:6 A man had a fig tree growing in his vineyard, and he went to look for fruit on it but did not find any.

LISTENERS HEARD: 

A somebody had a fig tree  having been planted in that vineyard of his, and he showed up searching for fruit in it and didn't discovered any. 

MY TAKE: 

Old institutions become corrupt and unproductive.

GREEK (Each Word Explained Bottom of Page): 

GREEK ORDER: 

Συκῆν      εἶχέν τις                  πεφυτευμένην        ἐν τῷ ἀμπελῶνι αὐτοῦ, καὶ ἦλθεν              ζητῶν       καρπὸν
a fig tree  had   A somebody having been planted in that vineyard of his, and he showed up searching for fruit

ἐν αὐτῇ καὶ  οὐχ    εὗρεν.
in it       and didn't discovered any. 

LOST IN TRANSLATION: 

There are hidden references in it to "fathering" here in the word for planted. The inference is that the man was the father of the tree that was planted in the past. A "tree" is a common symbol that Jesus (and John before him) used for Israel, the branches of a tree representing its generations. Jesus is saying that this man, the father, found that tree barren.

# KJV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

10

A certain(WW) man(IW) had a fig tree (MWhaving) (MWbeen) planted(WF) in his (MWthe) vineyard; and he came and(IW) sought(WF) fruit there(CW)on, and found none (CW)

  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "certain" should be something more like "somebody."
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "man" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WT -- Wrong Tense -- This verb is the past perfect tense, which requires a "having" before the verb.
  • WV -- Wrong Tense -- This verb is the  passive voice, which requires a "been" before the verb.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having planted."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "vineyard" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The "and" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "seeking."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common word usually translated as "there."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the common word usually translated as "none."

# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

8

A man(WW) had a fig tree (MWhaving) (MWbeen) growing(WW, WF) in his (MWthe) vineyard, and he went to look(WF) for fruit on it but(WW) did not find any.

  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "man" should be something more like "somebody."
  • WT -- Wrong Tense -- This verb is the past perfect tense, which requires a "having" before the verb.
  • WV -- Wrong Tense -- This verb is the  passive voice, which requires a "been" before the verb.
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "growing" should be something more like "planted."
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having been planted."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the/this" before "vineyard" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an infinitive verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "seeking."
  • WW --Wrong Word -- The word translated as "but" should be something more like "and."

EACH WORD of KJV : 

A -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

certain -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "certain" in the singular means "anyone," "someone,"  "something," and "anything." The same forms are used both for the masculine and feminine, so "anyone" works best for a person. In the plural, it means "everyone," "some," "they," and "those." Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who," "what," "which," or even "why." This word doesn't mean "certain." 

man -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "man" in the Greek source.

had -- The word translated as "have" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "to indulge in," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This does not create a past, perfect tense.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

fig tree   - The word for "fig tree" means "fig tree." In ancient times, figs were a symbol for abundance.

missing "having"  -- (WT) The helping vcrb, "have," is needed to show the past perfect tense of the verb.

missing "been"  -- (WV) The helping vcrb, "have," is needed to show the past perfect tense of the verb.

planted   - - (WF ) "Planted" is from a verb which means "beget," "engender," generally, "produce," "bring about," "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in, "to plant" (especially trees), "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents." This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having planted."

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "on," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with an indirect-object form object.  About time, it means "during the time," "in the time," "within," and "in." With the direct object form, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word correctly translated as third-person "his/him" in English.  The word appears after the noun so the sense is "of his."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

vineyard; -- The Greek word for "vineyard" only means "vineyard.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

came  -- The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "start," "come," or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Technically, it is in the middle voice meaning the subject acts on himself. In English, this is assumed in our words "come" and "go." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

and -- -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

sought -- (WF) The Greek verb translated as "seek" has a variety of meanings around the idea of "searching" and "desiring." It has a sense of seeking with a specific aim. It also means to "search," "inquire into," "investigate, "require," "demand," and "examine." This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "seeking."

fruit -- The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit," "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors."

there -- (CW) The word translated as "there" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of an indirect object. This is not the word usually translated as "there."

on, -- The word translated as "on" means "in," "on," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with an indirect-object form object.  About time, it means "during the time," "in the time," "within," and "in." With the direct object form, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.

found -- The term used for "found" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

none. -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "none" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words. This is not the word usually translated as "none."

EACH WORD of NIV : 

A -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

man -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "certain" in the singular means "anyone," "someone,"  "something," and "anything." The same forms are used both for the masculine and feminine, so "anyone" works best for a person. In the plural, it means "everyone," "some," "they," and "those." Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who," "what," "which," or even "why." This word doesn't mean "man." 

had -- The word translated as "have" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "to indulge in," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses. This does not create a past, perfect tense.

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a noun doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

fig tree   - The word for "fig tree" means "fig tree." In ancient times, figs were a symbol for abundance.

missing "having"  -- (WT) The helping vcrb, "have," is needed to show the past perfect tense of the verb.

missing "been"  -- (WV) The helping vcrb, "have," is needed to show the past perfect tense of the verb.

growing - - (WW, WF) "Growing" is from a verb which means "beget," "engender," generally, "produce," "bring about," "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in, "to plant" (especially trees), "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents." This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having been planted."

in -- The word translated as "in" means "in," "on," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with an indirect-object form object.  About time, it means "during the time," "in the time," "within," and "in." With the direct object form, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word correctly translated as third-person "his/him" in English.  The word appears after the noun so the sense is "of his."

missing "the/this"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article," the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," and "those"). See this article for more.

vineyard; -- The Greek word for "vineyard" only means "vineyard.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis.

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

went -- The word translated as "went " primarily means "to start out" but Jesus usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "start," "come," or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway." Technically, it is in the middle voice meaning the subject acts on himself. In English, this is assumed in our words "come" and "go." Our English word "show up" captures both the "start" and "come" ideas. See this article for more.

to -- This "to" is added to create the infinitive form of the following verb. This is not its form.

look for -- (WF) The Greek verb translated as "seek" has a variety of meanings around the idea of "searching" and "desiring." It has a sense of seeking with a specific aim. It also means to "search," "inquire into," "investigate, "require," "demand," and "examine." This is not an infinitive but a participle, a verbal adjective, "seeking."

fruit -- The word translated as "fruit" primary meaning is "fruit," "seed," or "offspring," but its secondary meaning is "returns," specifically, "profit," as we would say "fruit of our labors."

on, -- The word translated as "on" means "in," "on," "within," "with" (an instrument), "by" (near), "by" (means of), "during" (time),  or "among"  with an indirect-object form object.  About time, it means "during the time," "in the time," "within," and "in." With the direct object form, it means "into," "on," and "for." When referring to time, it means "during." It can mean "on," "at," or "by" in the sense of "near."

it-- The word translated as "it " is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English in the form of an indirect object. This is not the word usually translated as "there."

but-- (WW)  The Greek word translated as "but" is used as the conjunction "and," but it also is used to add emphasis. This word doesn't mean "and." 

did -- This helping verb is used to create questions, commands, negative statements, and smooth word flow in English.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It means "no," "not," or"no truly." It makes a negative statement of fact. When a negative precedes the verb, it affects the whole clause. When it precedes other words, its force is limited to those words.

find -- The term used for "find" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover."

any. -- There is no Greek pronoun here, but Greek does not need pronouns when the object can be assumed from the context. In English, they are added for the subject-verb-object form of our sentences.

found -- The term used for "found" is the source of our word, "heuristic," meaning enabling a person to find out something for themselves. It means "find out" and "discover.

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV : 

Συκῆν [8 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Fig tree" is syke, which means "fig tree."  -  -

εἶχέν [181 verses]  (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act ) "Had" is echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to have due to one," "to maintain," "to indulge in,"  "to hold fast," "to hold in," "to bear," "to carry," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, it can mean "acquire," or "get." The main sense when it has an object is "to have" or "to hold." In reference to habits or states, it means "indulge in." With a gen. object,  "to keep back" or "withhold" a thing. When its object is an infinitive verb, it means "to have the means or power," or "to be able" not "it must" as in English.  This verb isn't used to form past tenses as the helper verb does in English.Nor does it have the sense of "must" when used with infinitives.

τις  [252 verses] (pron sg masc nom) "A certain man" is tis, which can mean "someone," "something," "any one," "everyone," "they [indefinite]," "many a one," "whoever," "anyone," "anything," "some sort," "some sort of," "each," "any," "the individual," "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who," "why," or "what." Plural, "who are" is τίνες ἐόντες.  It has specific meanings with certain prepositions, διὰ τί; for what reason? ἐκ τίνος; from what cause? ἐς τί; "to what point?"  to "what end? τί ὅτι "why it is that,"

πεφυτευμένην [7 verses]  (part sg perf mp fem acc) "Planted" is from phyteuo, which means "beget," "engender," generally, "produce," "bring about," "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in," "to plant {especially trees," "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents."

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "In" is en, which means, with its usual indirect (dative) object, "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," "during,"  and "with." With a direct (accusative) object, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during."

τῷ [821 verses](article sg masc dat)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). It usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. When not preceding a a word that can become a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."  --

ἀμπελῶνι  [19 verses] (noun sg masc dat) "Vineyard"is ampelon which means simply "vineyard."

αὐτοῦ [142 verses](adv/adj sg masc gen) "His/" is autou, which means is the singular adjective used as the genitive pronoun, which is used as a possessive form or the object of prepositions and sometimes verbs as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In its adverbial form, this means "just here" or "exactly there." This form is often used as the object of a preposition, him." This form of an object of a preposition means a movement away from something or a position away from something else. The time sense of a genitive object is that the event occurred within a specified time. Though the form is masculine, it refers to masculine words, not people.  The masculine form is used to refer to people in general, not just men.

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

ἦλθεν [198 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "He came" is  erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out," "to come," "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

ζητῶν[36 verses] (part sg pres act masc nom) "Sought" is zeteo, which means "inquire for," "search for," "seek after," "desire," and "feel the want of."

καρπὸν [32 verses] (noun sg masc acc) "Fruit"is karpos, which means "fruit," "the fruits of the earth," "seed," "offspring," "returns for profit," and "reward."

ἐν [413 verses](prep) "On" is en, which means, with its usual indirect (dative) object, "in," "on," "at," "by," "among," "within," "surrounded by," "in one's hands," "in one's power," "during,"  and "with." With a direct (accusative) object, it means "into," "on," and "for." Referring to time, it means. "in the course of" or "during."

αὐτῇ [42 verses](adj sg fem dat ) "There" is aute, which means is the singular adjective used as the indirect object pronoun in the feminine.  It also means "it" because feminine pronouns refer to things or ideas as much as to people.  When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." However, feminine pronouns refer to feminine nouns, not just feminine people so this word can mean "it" as well as "she." A dative object of a preposition implies no movement but in a fixed position. With the "to be," it acts as a possessive, "his."

καὶ [1089 verses](conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "also." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even," "also," and "just."

οὐχ (partic) [269 verses](partic, adv) "None" is ou , the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences.  The negative, οὐ, denies, is absolute, and objective.

εὗρεν [43 verses] (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Found" is heurisko, which means "to find," "to find out," "to discover," "to devise," "to invent," "to get," and "to gain."

Front Page Date: 

Aug 9 2024