Luke 14:35 It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill;

Spoken to: 

audience

Jesus changes the discussion to "salt" meaning "wit."

KJV: 

Luke 14:35 It is neither fit for the land, nor yet for the dunghill; but men cast it out. He that hath ears to hear, let him hear

NIV : 

Luke 14:35 It is fit neither for the soil nor for the manure pile; it is thrown out. “Whoever has ears to hear, let them hear.”

LISTENERS HEARD: 

It is suitable neither for ground nor for dunghill. They toss it outside. The one having ears to listen? He must listen! 

MY TAKE: 

Some "salts" a just mineral salts.

GREEK (Each Word Explained Bottom of Page): 

GREEK ORDER: 

οὔτε εἰς        γῆν      οὔτε εἰς κοπρίαν εὔθετόν   ἐστιν: ἔξω     βάλλουσιν αὐτό.
neither for ground nor for dunghill suitable It is. outside They toss  it.  

          ἔχων     ὦτα  ἀκούειν    ἀκουέτω.
The one having ears to listen? He must listen! 

LOST IN TRANSLATION: 

This verse ends with one of Jesus's taglines, "having ears to hear".  The translation reverses the words in the first phrase Making it seem less like a spoken question than it is. 

There is a lot of debate about the meaning of "salt" with "land/soil" and "dunghill." I find many of them amusing, but I have my own (original?) interpretation. I suspect that salt was used to describe the products of the Dead Sea.This was likely spoken near Jerusalem or south of it, the area of the Dead Sea. While it is described as a "salt" sea because its salinity is over 34%, the chemicals mined from it were asphalt and potash, asphalt for Roman road (land) and potash for fertilizer (and as an ingredient in cement, popular in Roman times). It also has large amount of sodium chloride (regular salt). Potash comes in a variety of potassium salts including potassium chloride.

# KJV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

10

It is neither fit for the(IW) land, nor yet(IW) for the(IW) dunghill; but(IW) men(IW) cast it out. He(CW) that(IW)  hath(WF) ears to hear, let(CW) him(WF) hear

  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "yet" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "but" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "men" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the pronoun usually translated as "he."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- The verb "let" is not addressed to someone, it is a third-person command.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is the subject, "he," not an object, "him".

# NIV TRANSLATION ISSUES: 

10

It is neither fit for the(IW) soil for the(IW) manure pile; it(WF) is(WV) thrown out. “Whoever(CW) that(IW) has(WF) ears to hear, let(CW) them(WF, WN) hear”

  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • IW - Inserted Word-- The "the" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is the object "it," not the subject of the verb.
  • WV --Wrong Voice - The verb here is translated as passive but it is active.**
  • CW --Confusing Word -- This is not the pronoun usually translated as "whoever."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The "that" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "having."
  • CW --Confusing Word -- The verb "let" is not addressed to someone, it is a third-person command.
  • WN  --Wrong Number- The word "them" is translated as plural but the Greek word is singular
  • WF -- Wrong Form -  This is the subject, "he," not an object, "him".

EACH WORD of KJV : 

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  The word also means "to exist" and where it doesn't connect to characteristics or conditions.

neither -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

fit  -- The Greek word translated as "fit"  means "well-arranged", "conveniently placed", "in a suitable place", and of persons "well-adapted".  In English today, you would say "well-positioned" to capture the feeling of this word.

for -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject, "up to" limits in measures, "until" in reference to time, "within" a time limit, and "for" a purpose or object. Used with the Greek "from" it means "from...to."

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

land, -- The word translated as "land" means "ground," "land," "country," and "dirt." Translated as "earth," it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Jesus describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

nor -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

yet -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

for -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject, "up to" limits in measures, "until" in reference to time, "within" a time limit, and "for" a purpose or object. Used with the Greek "from" it means "from...to."

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

dunghill; -- This dunghill word means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure". 

but (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

men  (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

cast  -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. It is a word that he frequently uses in a light-hearted way. In dice, it means "to throw" the dice, but with the sense of being lucky. See this article about a related word.

it -- The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  Here it is neuter in the form of a subject or object of a verb or preposition.  

out -- The word translated as "out" means "out of a place" and "outside."

. He   -- (CW)The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.  This is not the pronoun usually translated as "he." 

that -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

hath  -- The word translated as "have" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "to indulge in," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses.

ears -- The term translated as "ears" means "ear," things resembling a handle and is a metaphor for understanding.

to -- This "to" is added to create the infinitive form of the following verb.

hear, - - "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear," "to hear of," and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent." This is not an active verb but a participle, a verbal adjective, "hearing."

let -- (CW) This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second person. This form is used as something like our word "must." Using "let" as the active verb, rather than a helper verb like "must," changes the subject from the third party to the second.

him -- (WF) This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb. This is the subject, not an object.

hear  -- "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear," "to hear of," and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent."

EACH WORD of NIV : 

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  The word also means "to exist" and where it doesn't connect to characteristics or conditions.

neither -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

fit  -- The Greek word translated as "fit"  means "well-arranged", "conveniently placed", "in a suitable place", and of persons "well-adapted".  In English today, you would say "well-positioned" to capture the feeling of this word.

for -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject, "up to" limits in measures, "until" in reference to time, "within" a time limit, and "for" a purpose or object. Used with the Greek "from" it means "from...to."

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

soil, -- The word translated as "soil" means "ground," "land," "country," and "dirt." Translated as "earth," it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Jesus describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

nor -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

yet -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

for -- The word translated as "to" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "in regards to" a subject, "up to" limits in measures, "until" in reference to time, "within" a time limit, and "for" a purpose or object. Used with the Greek "from" it means "from...to."

the -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source.

manure pile -- This word  "manure pile" means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure".

it --  (WF) The word translated as "it" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  Here it is neuter in the form of a subject or object of a verb or preposition. This is from the third-person, singular pronoun. This is the object, not the subject of the verb.

is  -- (WV) This helping verb "is" seems to indicate that the verb is passive but it isn't.

thrown -- The word translated as "cast" has a number of meanings revolving around "throw" as we do in English with both "throw" and "toss." Jesus often uses this word in the same way we use "dump" in English. It is a word that he frequently uses in a lighthearted way. In dice, it means "to throw" the dice, but with the sense of being lucky. See this article about a related word.

out -- The word translated as "out" means "out of a place" and "outside."

Whoever -- (CW)The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this," "that," "these," "those") than the English "the." See this article for more.  This is not the pronoun usually translated as "whoever." 

that -- (IW) This word is not in the Greek source. It was added because the next verb was translated as active rather than as a participle.

has -- (WF) The word translated as "has" means to "have," "possess," "bear," "to indulge in," "keep close," "hold in," "to have due to one," or "keep" and many specific uses.

ears -- The term translated as "ears" means "ear," things resembling a handle and is a metaphor for understanding.

to -- This "to" is added to create the infinitive form of the following verb.

hear, - -"Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear," "to hear of," and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent."

let -- (CW) This "let" is the helping verb used to translate the Greek form of the third-person command. In English all commands are in the second person. This form is used as something like our word "must." Using "let" as the active verb, rather than a helper verb like "must," changes the subject from the third party to the second.

them -- (WF,WN) This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb. This is the subject, not an object. This word is not plural but singular.

hear  -- "Hear" is from a Greek verb that means "to hear," "to hear of," and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.   It also means "to listen" and "to understand," but amusingly, it also means "to be silent."

COMPARISON: GREEK to KJV : 

οὔτε [12 verses](partic) "Neither" is oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."With verbs of speaking, it is the person spoken "to." With time, a limit "until," or a duration "for," "throughout," or a date, "on," "at." Used with ek, it means "from...to."

γῆν [59 verses](noun sg fem acc) "Earth" is ge, which means "the element of earth," "land (country)," "arable land," "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet.

οὔτε [12 verses](partic) "Neither" is oute, which means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series. -- "Neither" is a Greek conjunction that means "and not," and "neither/nor" when used in a series.

εἰς [325 verses](prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)," "until (of time)," "in" (a position),  "as much as (of measure or limit)," "as far as (of measure or limit)," "towards (to express relation)," "in regard to (to express relation)," "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."With verbs of speaking, it is the person spoken "to." With time, a limit "until," or a duration "for," "throughout," or a date, "on," "at." Used with ek, it means "from...to."

κοπρίαν [uncommon] (noun sg fem acc) "Dung it" [2 verses] (noun sg fem acc or pl fem gen) "Dung it" is from kopria which means "dunghill", "rubbish-heap", "dung", "muck", and "manure".

εὔθετόν  [2 verses](adj sg masc/fem/neut acc) "Fit" is euthetoswhich means "well-arranged", "conveniently placed", "in a suitable place", "well-fitting", "ready for use", of persons "well-adapted", "quick", "able", and "fit and proper".

ἐστίν [614 verses] (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be," "to exist," "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen,"  and "is possible." With the possessive (genitive) object, it means "is descended from," "is the type of," "belongs to," "is made of," "is a duty of," "is at the mercy of," or " is dependent on." With an indirect (dative) object, it means "have" where the subject and object are reversed.  "It is to him" becomes "it is his" or "he has it."  With the preposition,"into" (εἰς), the sense is "consist of." When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

ἔξω [21 verses](adv) "Out" is exo, which means "out of a place," "outside," "external things," and "beyond a time."

βάλλουσιν [54 verses] (verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Cast"  is ballo, which means "to throw," "to let fall," "to cast," "to put," "to pour," "to place money on deposit," "push forward or in front [of animals]," "to shed," "to place," "to pay,"to throw [of dice,]" "to be lucky," "to fall," "to lay as foundation," "to begin to form," "to dash oneself with water," and "to bathe."

αὐτό   [24 verses](pron/adj sg neut nom/acc) "It" is auto, which means "it," the neuter pronoun as a subject or object. It also means "itself," and "the same." When used as a noun, it is preceded by a definite article, and it means "the same." An accusative object indicates movement towards something or a position reached as a result of that movement. Event may show the amount of time

[821 verses](article sg masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the").   It usually precedes a noun or changes the word it precedes (adjective, infinitive, participle, etc.) to act like a noun. When not preceding a a word that can become a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἔχων  [181 verses](part sg pres act masc nom) "He hath" is echo, which means "to have," "to hold," "to possess," "to keep," "to have charge of," "to have due to one," "to maintain," "to indulge in,"  "to hold fast," "to hold in," "to bear," "to carry," "to keep close," "to keep safe," and "to have means to do." In aorist, it can mean "acquire," or "get." The main sense when it has an object is "to have" or "to hold." In reference to habits or states, it means "indulge in." With a gen. object,  "to keep back" or "withhold" a thing. When its object is an infinitive verb, it means "to have the means or power," or "to be able" not "it must" as in English.  This verb isn't used to form past tenses as the helper verb does in English.Nor does it have the sense of "must" when used with infinitives.

ὦτα [15 verses] (noun pl neut acc)  "Ears" is from ous, which means "ear" and things that resemble an ear, such as a handle on pitchers, cups, etc.

ἀκούειν [95 verses] (verb pres inf act) "To hear" is akouo,  which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  However, two genitives can be used with the sense of "hear of a thing from a person."

ἀκουέτω. (verb 3rd sg pres imperat act) "Let...hear" [95 verses](2nd pl imperf ind act) "Shall hear" is akouo,  which means "hear of," "hear tell of," "what one actually hears," "know by hearsay," "listen to," "give ear to," "hear and understand," and "understand." The accusative object is the person/thing heard about, while the genitive is the person/thing heard from.  However, two genitives can be used with the sense of "hear of a thing from a person." - --

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Front Page Date: 

Sep 27 2024