Luke 17:8 And will not rather say unto him, Make ready wherewith I may sup,

KJV Verse: 

Luke 17:8 And will not rather say unto him, Make ready wherewith I may sup, and gird thyself, and serve me, till I have eaten and drunken; and afterward thou shalt eat and drink?

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Instead indeed you will say to him, "Get ready something I might make a meal and preparing yourself act like a servant to me in order that I might eat and  might drink and after that, you will eat and drink, you yourself."

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is part of  a humorous response explaining why the Apostles cannot command a tree to uproot itself because of their lack of faith.  In this analogy, the apostles and the tree are the bondsman, who place is to serve others, not command. This verse uses similar vocabulary to Luke 12: 37, which makes the opposite statement, having the master serve the servants. The question form of the KJV is both cumbersome and unnecessary and perhaps impossible since the verse ends with a pronoun for emphasis. The verse again has a number of uncommon words and a unique one.

The Greek word translated as "and The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

The word translated as "not" is a different form of the usual Greek negative of fact meaning "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," and "notwithstanding." rather say unto him,

"Will say" is from the Greek verb that means "to say" and "to speak" also.

 The word translated as "unto him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

The verb translated as "make ready" means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare." It is in a form that indicates the action has been completed.

The Greek word translated as "wherewith " in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." The form here is "something".

"I may sup" is from a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here that means to "have a meal" and "entertain."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The Greek verb translated as "gird thyself"  means "to gird around ", that is to say, "brace around". The sense is to prepare yourself, more specifically belting your clothing. Jesus uses the same word in Luke 12:37. The sense is that tying up their clothing humbles someone. The form is not an active verb, but an adjective, "preparing yourself".

There is no "and" because the previous verb is not active. 

The Greek verb translated as "serve" means "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." It is usually translated as "minister". It is from the same root as the Greek word usually translated as "minister". 

The "me" is in the indirect object form on the first-person pronoun, so usually "to me", though the form has other uses in Greek. 

The word translated as "till" means "until" but it also means "in order that."

The word translated as "I have eaten" is one of the two common words used to mean "eat."It means "to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour". It is not a past tense, but a form that indicates something that might possibly happen in the past, present, or future, "might eat".

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word "drunken" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate." As above, it is not a past tense, but a form that indicates something that might possibly happen in the past, present, or future, "might drink".

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The "afterward" is two Greek words meaning "after that".  "After" is the Greek word that usually means "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit. The "that" is a pronoun that can mean "this" or "that," the nearer or the further depending on usage.

The "thou" here is the pronoun. Since pronouns are not usually used as a subject in Greek, its use is to accentuate the word like we would say "you yourself". It comes at the end of the sentence, which really emphasizes it.

The word translated as "shall eat" is one of the two common words used to mean "eat."It means "to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour." But the form is the future tense so "will eat". "Shall eat" sounds like permission is being given, which isn't the sense in Greek.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word "drink" is the Greek for meaning to "drink". It also has a double meaning. "To drink" also means "to celebrate."

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "And" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

οὐχὶ (partic) "Not rather" is ouchi, an adverb which means "no", "no truly", "assuredly not", "not however", "nevertheless," "notwithstanding", "yet", "still", "never yet", "for not", "indeed", "for surely not", "no,—certainly not", "for I don't suppose," and "for in no manner."

ἐρεῖ (verb 2nd sg fut ind mid) "Will...say" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer." --

αὐτῷ (adj sg masc dat) "Unto him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

Ἑτοίμασον ( verb 2nd sg aor imperat act) "Make ready" is from hetoimazô, which means to "get ready," "prepare", "make ready," and "to cause to prepare." In the passive, it means to "prepare for oneself," "prepare oneself," "make oneself ready," and "to be prepared."

τί (pron sg neut acc) "Wherewith" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

δειπνήσω, [unique](verb 1st sg aor subj act) "I may sup" is deipneō , which means to " make a meal" and "entertain."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

περιζωσάμενος [uncommon]( part sg aor mid masc nom ) "Gird thyself" is perizōnnymiwhich means "to gird round oneself", and "to gird oneself with".

διακόνει   (verb 2nd sg pres imperat act) "Serve" is from diakoneo, which "to act as a servant", "to minister," and "to perform services." --

μοι (pron 1st sing dat) "Me" is moi, which means "I", "me", and "my".

ἕως (conj) "Till" is heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that." --

φάγω ( verb 1st sg aor subj act ) "I have eaten" is phago) which is a form of the word, phagein, which means to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour." "

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πίω, ( verb 1st sg aor subj act ) "drunken" is pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

μετὰ (prep) "Afterward" is meta, (with tauta below) which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to,"  "after", "behind",  and "next afterward." --

ταῦτα (adj pl neut acc) "Afterward"  is tauta, (with meta above) which is a referring pronoun meaning "these", "this", "that," and "here." It can mean the nearer or the further depending on usage. As an adverb it can mean "therefore" and "that is why."

φάγεσαι ( verb 2nd sg fut ind mid ) "Shall eat" is phago) which is a form of the word, phagein, which means to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

πίω, ( verb 1st sg aor subj act ) "Drink" is pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

σύ; (pron 2nd sg nom) "Thou" is su which means "you" and "your."

Related Verses: 

Sep 11 2018