Luke 19:27 But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

In addition, the people there of mine, those, the ones not desiring me to reign over them. You bring here and execute them in front of me

KJV : 

Luke 19:27 But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

 The KIV version has words in it that are not in the Greek but do appear in the Latin Vulgate.

The word translated as "But " is a less common preposition used like a conjunction that means "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to."  It is not the two common Greek word translated as "but"

The word translated as "those" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there."

"Mine" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

There is no "enemies" in the Greek. It appears for the first time in Latin Vulgate as an interpretation of the rather convoluted Greek in this verse. 

The word translated as "which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

The Greek word translated as "would " is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. Its primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". As an participle, it means "desiring" or "willing".

The negative used"not" here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.

There is no "that" here in this sense.

There is no "I should" in this verse. It would require  a verb in the first person subjunctive which doesn't exist.

"Reign" is the verb that means to "be king", "rule", and "reign". It is the verb form with the same root as "kingdom" and "king", which are very common, but this word is rare.   The form is an infinitive, "to reign".  It goes with the participle "wanting" or "desiging"

The word translated as "over" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

"Bring" is a Greek word which means "to lead", "to carry," or "to fetch" and has a lot of different specific meanings in different contexts. Not all of these are negative, for example, this phrase could mean "guided." It is in the passives, future, so "you a going to be guided."

"Hither" is from a pronoun that means "what is present" or "here it is".

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

"Slay" is  a verb that Jesus only uses here. The word means to "slaughter" and "murder" but since there are others words that Jesus common uses that has these meanings, this meaning here is likely more official such as executre.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

 The Greek word translated as "before" means "in front of" referring to place and when used to apply to time means "beforehand."

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, required by the preposition.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πλὴν ( (prep) "But" is from plen, which is a preposition meaning "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to." Often used with the negative as a conjunction, "except not."

τοὺς  ( article pl masc acc )  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἐχθρούς ( adj pl masc acc ) "Those" is ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is emou, which means "me", and "mine".

τούτους (adj pl masc acc) Untranslated is toutou, which is a demonstrative pronoun that means "this", "here", "the nearer," and "the familiar." -

τοὺς ( article pl masc acc ) "Which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

θελήσαντάς ( part pl aor act masc acc ) "Would" is thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing (of consent rather than desire)", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" "to maintain", "to hold", "to delight in, and "will (too express a future event with inanimate objects)." As a participle, it means "being willing" or, adverbially, "willingly," and "gladly". .

με (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

βασιλεῦσαι ( verb aor inf act ) "Should reign" is basileuo, which means to "be king", "rule", and "reign".

ἐπ᾽ (prep) "Against" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against."

αὐτοὺς ( adj pl masc acc ) "Them"  is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἀγάγετε ( verb 2nd pl aor ind act ) "Bring" is ago, which means to "lead", "carry", "bring", "fetch", "take with one", "carry of", "bear up", "remove", "lead to a point", "lead", "guide", "manage", "refer", "bring up", "train", "educate", "reduce", "draw out (in length)", "hold", "celebrate", "observe (a date)", "pass (Time)", "hold account", "treat", "draw down (in the scale)," and "weight."

ὧδε (pron) "Hither" is hode, the demonstrative pronoun which means "this" in the sense of "what is present" and "what can be seen." With verbs of action and with a person, it means "here" as in "here I am" in the sense of "I am present."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

κατασφάξατε [unique]( verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Slay" is katasphazō  that means to "slaughter" and "murder".

αὐτοὺς ( adj pl masc acc ) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἔμπροσθέν (adv) "Before" is emprosthen, which as an adverb means [of place]"in front of", "before", "forwards," [of time] "before", "of old," and as a preposition, "facing", "opposite", "in front," [of time] beforehand," and [of degree] "preferred before." It also denotes a ranking.

μου. (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is emou, which means "me", and "mine".

Front Page Date: 

Nov 20 2018