Luke 22:25 The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

These rulers of other ethnic groups lord over them and the ones having power over them, "Benefactors", they are called by themselves.

KJV : 

Luke 22:25  The kings of the Gentiles exercise lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are called benefactors.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse has three unique words. It also has a clear punchline at the end. Comparing this verse to Matthew 20:25, this verse uses more common words though they are used uniquely by Jesus here, but this verse uses those words in more complex forms. This version, however, is more entertaining because of the ending.

"The kings" is translated from a Greek word which means a "king" or "chief."

The word translated as "of the Gentiles " means "a group of people living together," a nation, a tribe, or a cast of people. Later it came to mean "barbarous nations" similar to our idea of ethnic people. It is in the same form as the "them" above, so "to them" or "for them." The "of" comes from the form of the word.

"Exercise lordship over" is from a Greek verb that Jesus only uses here. It  means " to be lord or master of" and " "possession of," and "seize".  However, this is a common verb outside of the NT. In Matthew, Jesus adds a prefix to this word, making it a new form. This word is the verb form of word Jesus commonly uses as a noun.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.   

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The word translated as "they that " is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one."  Here, it preceded the adjective form of a verb, making it act like a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  The form is that of the subject of the sentence. 

"Exercise authority upon" is another verb Jesus only uses in the verse that means to "exercise authority", "have power", "exercise authority over" and "enjoy license".  The form is not that of an active verb but of an adjective, "exercising authority over". The form is that of the subject of the sentence. This word is the verb form of word Jesus commonly uses as a noun.

The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.   

The term translated as "are called" is like our word "call" because it means both "to summon" and also "to name." The form is that of someone acting on themselves, so "calling themselves". Other people are not calling them this, but they are calling themselves. This word comes at the end of the verse and is its punchline.

"Benefactors" is a Greek noun that Jesus only uses here. It means " benefactor " and, as an adjective, "beneficent", and "bountiful." This word is also in the form of a subject.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οἱ βασιλεῖς (noun pl masc nom) "The kings" is basileus, which means a "king", "chief", "prince", "lord", "master", "a great man," and "the first and most distinguished of any class." It is a form of the word used for "kingdom." --

τῶν ἐθνῶν (noun pl neut gen) "Of the gentiles" is ethnos, which means "a number of people living together", "company", "body of men," "tribe", "a people", "nation," and (later) "foreign, barbarous nations." --

κυριεύουσιν [unique]( verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Exercise lordship over" is kyrieuō, which means " to be lord or master of" and " "possession of," and "seize".

αὐτῶν ( adj pl masc gen) "Them" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

οἱ ( article pl masc nom ) "They that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." 

ἐξουσιάζοντες [unique]( part pl pres act masc nom ) "Exercise authority " is  exousiazō, which means to "exercise authority", "have power", "exercise authority over" and "enjoy license". 

αὐτῶν ( adj pl masc gen) "Them" (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

εὐεργέται [unique]( noun pl masc nom ) "Benefactors" is  euergetēs, which means " benefactor " and, as an adjective, "beneficent", and "bountiful."

καλοῦνται. ( verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Are called" is kaleo, which means "call", "summon", "invite", "invoke", "call by name," and "demand."

Front Page Date: 

Feb 6 2019