Luke 6:35 But love ye your enemies, and do good,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Besides, love those haters of yours, not only do good but lend nothing despairing. Not only shall it be, that compensation of yours, much but also you shall be sons of the highest because he himself is good against the ungracious and worthless. 

KJV : 

Luke 6:35 But love ye your enemies, and do good, and lend, hoping for nothing again; and your reward shall be great, and ye shall be the children of the Highest: for he is kind unto the unthankful and to the evil.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The Greek word translated as "but" is a preposition meaning "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to." Often used with the negative as a conjunction, "except not." 

The word translated as "love" is associated with affection rather than passion. It is sometimes described as "brotherly love." It evokes a sense of caring. The Greek word for passionate love, especially in a sexual sense, is another word that is our root word for "erotic". To express "love" in the sense of "liking" someone, Christ uses another word, which is also translated in the Gospels "love," in the Gospels. (For more about the meaning of "love" go to this article.) The word translated as "love" is associated with affection rather than passion. One of its meanings is "to embrace with affection."

The Greek word translated as "enemies" has the primary meaning of is "the hated" or "the hateful". This gets more interesting because a secondary meaning of this Greek word is "the hating" and "the hostile," that is, those who hate us.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek word is translated as "do good" means "to do good", "to do well", "to act rightly," and "to exert a beneficial influence." It means literally "to make good", which we use in English to mean "make good on a debt". 

The word translated as "lend" is a little more specific than the English word, referring specifically to the lending of money.

The Greek verb translated as "hoping" means "despair of" "to be given up in despair", "hope not", causal, "drive to despair". It is actually the opposite of "hoping" but the double negative doesn't work in Greek the same as it does in English (see below). It it in the form of an adjective, "despairing of". 

The is not Greek word corresponding to "nothing." It is added to make "hoping" work in English, 

The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners.

The Greek word translated as "reward" really means "compensation," what you receive for doing work. In Christ's teaching, there is spiritual compensation and worldly compensation.

The verb "shall be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The word translated as "great" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size.

The verb "you shall be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The word translated as "thus children" means "son" more generally means "child." It refers to all offspring in later generations, just like "father" refers to all previous generations. Christ also used it metaphorically to describe those that follow a way of thought or set of beliefs that descend from an individual. More about it in this article.

"Of the Highest" is a superlative adjective that means "highest", and "loftiest". 

In the Greek source, the word translated as "for" means "that" or "because." So what follows is a dependent clause, indicating either what they were "saying" or why they were saying it.

The word translated as "he" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances. Since the verb carries the sam information as the pronoun, its use adds emphasis, like "he himself."

The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

The Greek word translated as which "kind" means "good", "useful", "good of its kind," and "serviceable;" of persons, "good", "kindly;" "honest", and "worthy."  For more on this topic, see this article.

The word translated as "unto" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on."

The Greek adjective translated as "the unthankful" means "ungracious", "unpleasant", "without grace or charm", and "thankless."

The word translated as "to the evil" means "second-rate" or "worthless." This article explores it meaning in more detail. It is an adjective, but when used as a noun, therefore, "what is worthless."

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

πλὴν (adv) "But" is from plen, which is a preposition meaning "except", "save", "besides," and "in addition to." Often used with the negative as a conjunction, "except not." 

ἀγαπᾶτε (2nd pl pres imperat) "Love" is from agapao, which means "to be fond of", "to greet with affection", "to persuade", "to caress", "to prize", "to desire", "to be pleased with," and "to be contended with." This love is more associated with affection than passion. See this article on love for more information.

τοὺς ἐχθροὺς (adj pl masc acc) "Enemies" is from echthros, which means "the hated", "the hateful", "the hostile", "the enemy", "the alienated," and "the hating."

ὑμῶν (pron pl 2nd gen) "Your" is from humon, which are the plural forms of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀγαθοποιεῖτε  [uncommon](verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Do good" is from agathopoieo, which means "to do good", "to do well", "to act rightly," and "to exert a beneficial influence."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

δανίζετε (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Lend" is from daneizowhich means "to put out to usury", "to let out", "to borrow," and "to have lent out to one." 

μηδὲν (adj sg neut nom/acc) "For nothing" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter." 

ἀπελπίζοντες: [unique] (part pl pres act masc nom) "Hoping again" is apelpizo, which means "despair of" "to be given up in despair", "hope not", causal, "drive to despair", and, in the passive. 

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἔσται (verb 3rd sg fut ind mid) "Shall be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") 

μισθὸς (noun sg masc nom) "Reward" is misthos, which means "wages" in the sense of compensation for work done, "pay", "hire", "fee", "recompense," and "reward." 

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." --

πολύς, (adj sg masc nom) "Great" is polus, which means "many (in number)", "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far", "very much", "a great way," and "long." 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." 

ἔσεσθε (verb 2nd pl fut ind mid ) "Ye shall be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai.)

υἱοὶ (noun pl masc nom) "The children" is huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant. 

Ὑψίστου, [unique](adj sg masc gen irreg_superl) "Of the Highest" is from hypsistoswhich  means "highest", and "loftiest". 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "For" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." 

αὐτὸς (adj sg masc nom) "He" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

χρηστός (adj sg masc nom) "Kind" is chrestos, which means "good", "useful", "good of its kind," and "serviceable;" of persons, "good", "kindly;" "honest", "worthy," in war, "valiant", "true;" of the gods, "propitious", "merciful", "bestowing health or wealth;" of a man, "strong", "able in body for sexual intercourse;" when used as a now, "benefits", "kindnesses", "happy event", "prosperity," and "success.;" in a moral sense, it is the opposite of kakos, which means "bad" and "evil," but which is not the word usually translated as "evil" in the NT. For more on this topic, see this article.

ἐστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." ( The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") 

ἐπὶ "Unto" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τοὺς ἀχαρίστους (adj pl masc acc) "The unthankful" is  acharistos, which means "ungracious", "unpleasant", "without grace or charm", and "thankless."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πονηρούς. (adj pl masc acc) "To the evil" is poneros, which means "burdened by toil", "useless," and "worthless." In a moral sense, it means "worthless", "base," and "cowardly." 

Front Page Date: 

Oct 7 2017