Luke 8:6 And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And another fell down on the rock and, having been put forth, it was withered away because of its lacking moisture. 

KJV : 

Luke 8:6 And some fell upon a rock; and as soon as it was sprung up, it withered away, because it lacked moisture.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Again, the English translate obscures many of the differences between this version and those in the other gospels. This verse is much simpler than the long version in Matthew (Matthew 13:6Mat 13:5) and even the shorter version in Mark (Mar 4:5), plus it uses enough novel vocabulary that it seems more like a remembered version than Jesus's actual words, which are more likely like the version in Matthew. However, it does contain similar unusual (memorable)  structures, such as the infinitive used as a noun, which appears in all version. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

The word translated as "some" means "another", "one of two", "other," or "different." It is an adjective used as a noun. In the other two versions, Jesus used the Greek word that means "some", which he more commonly uses. 

"Fell" is translated from a Greek word that means "to fall down." Unlike the verbs in the other two versions, it is an unusual compound word. This specific word is only used twice in the Gospels, both in Luke.

The word translated as "upon" means "against", "before", "by" or "on."

"A rock" is the Greek word for "rock", "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It also has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" of "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge."  It is introduced by an article so "the rock". This is different than the word in the other gospels, which is an adjective meaning "the rocky" not literally "the rock".

The long phrase "as soon as it was sprung up" is a Greek verb meaning "put forth". It is in the form of a passive adjective, "having been put forth". 

"It withered away" is a verb that means "to become dry", "to become parched," and "to wither away." It is passive and past. "It was withered away". 

The word translated as "because" means "through," in the midst of", "because of" or "by (a cause)."

The word translated as "they had" means "to possess", "to hold," or "to keep". However, it is an infinitive, introduced by an article, so it takes on the role of a noun in the negative, so "the lack."

The negative "no" used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion, commands, and requests. The sense is about appearances not necessarily reality. The use of this form makes sense if Christ is addressing something that we cannot know for sure, or something not wanted. 

The Greek noun for "moisture"  means "moisture", "juices", and "moist secretions". This is the only time it used in the NT. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj)"And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἕτερον (adj sg masc acc) "Some" is heteros, which means "one or the other of two", "the second", "the secondary", "the minor", "other things [of like kind]", "another", "different," "other than", "different from", "other than should be," and "in another or a different way." As an adverb, it means "in one or the other way", "differently", "otherwise than should be", "badly," and "wrongly."

κατέπεσεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Fell" is from the verb katapipto, which means "to fall down" and "to drop". It is the common verb  pipto ("to fall") with the prefix, kata ("down"), so "to fall down". 

ἐπὶ (prep) "Upon" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against." -

τὴν πέτραν, (noun sg fem acc attic)  "Rock" is petros (petra) which means "rock", "boulder," and "stone" as a building material. It also has the specific meaning of "rocky cliffs" of "ledges" over the sea and a "rocky peak" or "ridge." 

καὶ "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

φυὲν [uncommon] (part sg aor pass neut nom) "As soon as it was sprung up" is phyo, which means "bring forth", "produce", and "put forth".

 ἐξηράνθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "They withered away" is from xêrainô, which means "to become dry", "to become parched," and "to wither away."

διὰ (prep) "Because" is from the preposition dia which means (with gen.) "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between." With the acc. it means "through," and causally, "because of", "by reason of," and "by aid of."

τὸ  (article sg neut acc) "It" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

μὴ (partic) "Not" is from me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective.

ἔχειν (verb pres inf act) "Have" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ἰκμάδα. [unique](noun sg fem acc) "Moisture" is ikmaswhich means "moisture", "juices", and "moist secretions". 

Front Page Date: 

Nov 20 2017