Mark 13:23 But take heed:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

You yourselves must watch out: I have foretold everything.

KJV : 

Mark 13:23 But take ye heed: behold, I have foretold you all things.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse begins with the pronoun "you." Since this information is part of the Greek verb, this pronoun is not necessary. The pronoun is only used in emphasize the subject as we would say "your yourself." None of the translators capture this.

The Greek word translated as "foretold," "told ahead of time," and "warned ahead of time" is only twice by Jesus, here and in the parallel verse in Matthew. This is Jesus's only direct reference to his making prophecies.

NIV : 

Mark 13:23 So be on your guard; I have told you everything ahead of time.

NLT : 

Mark 13:23 Watch out! I have warned you about this ahead of time!

Wordplay: 

Instead of asking us to hear his words, Christ asking us to seem them. In doing so, he doesn't use the Greek verb for "see" in the sense of "understanding" but an alternative verb that means physical seeing.

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

By using the adjective "all" here, Jesus is being either purposely vague or all specifically all encompassing, referring simultaneously to his predictions about the end times, false prophets, and the good times that follow. As with all Christ's prophecies, he leave us our freedom to choose him meaning.

The vagueness regarding what is being predicted is structural in the use of the adjective "all" without a noun to apply it too. Jesus can tell us the future, but he always leaves us our freedom to decide what he means. If we knew the future specifically, we would have no freedom to choose.

So in saying this, Christ could be saying that he as predicted these things or that he has commanded them beforehand. In other words, he has chosen all things beforehand.

What does he refer to here? He has been talking generally about the end times, but his previous verse was about the coming false prophets. Christ covers them all.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "Ye" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

βλέπετε: (verb 2nd pl pres imperat act) "Take heed" is from of blepo, which means "to look", "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to rely on", "to look longingly", "to propose", "to beware", "to behold," and "to look for."

προείρηκα [2 verses](verb 1st sg perf ind act) "Foretold" is prolego, which means to "say beforehand", or "say by way of preface."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is from humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

πάντα. (adj pl neut acc) "All things" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

KJV Analysis: 

But -- -- The Greek word translated as "but" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

take -- -- The verb translated as "take...heep" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

ye -- The pronoun "ye" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

heed: -- The verb translated as "take...heep" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

behold,  -- (OS) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "behold" in the source we use today but it does exist in the source that the KJV translators used.

-- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

have -- This helping verb "have" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past.

foretold -- The Greek verb translated as "foretold" it is a compound word, using the common word for "to say" and "to speak" with the prefix meaning "before." It is used here in the sense saying something before.

you -- This form of you could be a simple indirect object, but the form can also mean "for your benefit."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

things. -- This "things"  is from the plural, neutral form of the previous adjective.

KJV Translation Issues: 

1
  • OS -- Outdated Source -- The Greek word translated as "behold existed in the KJV Greek source but not the one we used today.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" is not shown in the English translation, but it is emphasized in the Greek. It begins the verse. The pronoun information is part of the verb and adding the pronoun itself is only added to emphasized it.  The sense is saying, "you yourself," in English.

So -- (WW) The Greek word translated as "so" means "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

be on your guard; --  (WW) The verb translated as "be on your guard" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

-- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

have -- This helping verb "have" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past.

told -- The Greek verb translated as "foretold" it is a compound word, using the common word for "to say" and "to speak" with the prefix meaning "before." It is used here in the sense saying something before.

you -- This form of you could be a simple indirect object, but the form can also mean "for your benefit."

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

ahead -- This is from the prefix of the verb above which means "before."

of time. -- (IW) There are no Greek word that can be translated as "of time" in the Greek source.

NIV Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "so" means "but."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "be on your guard" means "look."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "of time" doesn't exist in the source.

NLT Analysis: 

untranslated "you"-- (MW) The untranslated word "you" is not shown in the English translation, but it is emphasized in the Greek. It begins the verse. The pronoun information is part of the verb and adding the pronoun itself is only added to emphasized it.  The sense is saying, "you yourself," in English.

untranslated "but"-- (MW) The untranslated word "but", "however", and "on the other hand". Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better.

Watch out; -- The verb translated as "watch out" means "to see", "to look to", "to look like", "to beware", and "to look for." It is the more tangible sense of seeing, such as seeing what is right in front of you rather than understanding "look" in English.

-- This is from the first-person, singular form of the following verb.

have -- This helping verb "have" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past.

warned -- The Greek verb translated as "warned" it is a compound word, using the common word for "to say" and "to speak" with the prefix meaning "before." It is used here in the sense saying something before.

you -- This form of you could be a simple indirect object, but the form can also mean "for your benefit."

about this  -- (WW) The word translated as "about this" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

ahead -- This is from the prefix of the verb above which means "before."

of time. -- (IW) There are no Greek word that can be translated as "of time" in the Greek source.

NLT Translation Issues: 

4
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "you" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "but" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "about this" means "all."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "of time" doesn't exist in the source.

Front Page Date: 

Dec 27 2019