Mark 4:20 And these are they which are sown on good ground;

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And these are the ones on the ground, that good, being seeded. There hear the idea and they recognize [it] as correct and they bear fruit, in thirty and in sixty and in a hundred.

KJV : 

Mar 4:20 And these are they which are sown on good ground; such as hear the word, and receive it, and bring forth fruit, some thirtyfold, some sixty, and some an hundred.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is one of those verses that make me think that Jesus told this story different ways at different times, It is made to look in translation more like a similar verse (Matthew 13:23) than they really are in the Greek. Here, the verse is all in plural, which in Matthew the verse is all in singular, but in some places made to sound plural. In Matthew, those on the good ground "understand" the word. Here, Mark says that they "receive" the word, bt the word more likely means "accept it as correct." This is the only time in the Gospels that this specific Greek word translated as "receive" is used. And Jesus uses another Greek word meaning received frequently.  The ending here is made to sound similar to Matthew, but not only are the numbers in reverse order, but the phrases they are in area completely different.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἐκεῖνοί ( adj pl masc nom ) "These" is ekeinos, which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner." --

εἰσιν ( verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

οἱ (article pl masc nom) "They" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἐπὶ (prep) "On" is epi, which means "on", "over",  "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "after" in position, "during", and "against." --

τὴν (art sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

γῆν  (noun sg fem acc) "Earth" is ge, which means "the element of earth", "land (country)", "arable land", "the ground," and "the world" as the opposite of the sky. Like our English word "earth," it means both dirt and the planet. --

τὴν (art sg fem acc) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

καλὴν noun sg fem acc) "Good" is kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." --

σπαρέντες, ( part pl aor pass masc nom ) "Which are sow" is speiro, which means "to sow a seed", "to beget offspring", "to scatter like a seed," and "to sow a field."

οἵτινες ( pron pl masc nom ) "Such as" is hostis, which means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever." -- 

ἀκούουσιν  ( verb 3rd pl pres ind act attic ) "Hear" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." --

τὸν "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λόγον (noun sg masc acc) "Word" is logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

παραδέχονται [unique](verb 3rd pl pres ind mp ) "Receive" is from paradechomai, which means "receive from another", "take over", "admit", "allow," and "recognize as correct."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

καρποφοροῦσιν [uncommon] ( verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "Brings forth fruit" is from karpophoreô, which means specifically "to bear fruit." It is also a metaphor in Greek, as in English, for virtue. It is the positive from of the term used in the previous verse, akarpos, which means barren.

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

τριάκοντα  ( numeral )"Thirtyfold" is from triakonta which means "thirty."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

[ἐν] (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

ἑξήκοντα  ( numeral )  "Sixtyfold" is from hexekonta, which means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

[ἐν] (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

ἑκατόν. ( numeral ) "An hundredfold" is from hekaton, which is the number "a hundred."

KJV Analysis: 

And  The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

these The word translated as "these" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."

are The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

they  The word translated as "they which" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

which This word is from the subject form of the following verb. It is not that pronoun that indicates a subsidiary clause as "which" does in English.

are sown "Are sown" is from the verb meaning "to sow," which itself is a verbal form of the Greek word for "seed." However, here, the verb is in the form of a noun describing something that is sown at sometime, "that which is sown". "Seeds" are Christ's symbol for knowledge or the beginning of knowledge.

on The word translated as "on" means "on", "over", "upon", "against", "before", "after", "during", "by" or "on."

untranslated The Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." This article comes before "good" here, making it act more like a noun. Both the article and the adjective follow the phrase "the earth," The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

good  The word translated as "good means "good", "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality."  See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil."  The word translated as "well" means, as an adverb, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly".  

untranslated The Greek definite article, which here precedes the noun, "earth." 

ground; The word translated as "earth" means "ground" and "dirt". Translated as "earth", it refers to the physical planet, not society, which Christ describes as the world. See this article for more on these words.

such as "Such as" is a pronoun that means "that", "anyone who", "anything which", "whosoever," "whichsoever" and "anybody whatsoever."  It is plural, "these."

hear "Hear" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding.

the The Greek definite article, which here precedes the noun, "word." 

word, "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it. 

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

receive it , "Receive" is a Greek verb Jesus only uses here. It means "receive from another", "take over", "admit", "allow," and "recognize as correct."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

bring forth fruit, "Brings forth fruit" is from a Greek verb that means specifically "to bear fruit." It is formed from two roots, one the word for "fruit" and the other  the verb that means  "to bear", "to carry", "to bring", "to produce," and "to fetch."  It is also a metaphor in Greek, as in English, for virtue.

untranslated   The untranslated preposition means "in," "within", "with," or "among."

some There is no word "some" here in the Greek. In Matthew, a series of single person pronouns were translated as "some."

thirtyfold, "Thirtyfold" is the word that means "thirty."

untranslated The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

some There is no word "some" here in the Greek. In Matthew, a series of single person pronouns were translated as "some."

sixty, This Greek word means the number "sixty" or "the sixtieth part."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

some There is no word "some" here in the Greek. In Matthew, a series of single person pronouns were translated as "some."

an There is no Greek indefinite article here.

hundred. This is the number "hundred."

Front Page Date: 

Jun 27 2019