Mark 4:17 And have no root in themselves...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

And, no, they don't have a root in themselves, but temporary they are; then of becoming pressure or harassment by the idea immediately they are tripped up.

KJV : 

Mark 4:17  And have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time: afterward, when affliction or persecution ariseth for the word's sake, immediately they are offended. And have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time: afterward, when affliction or persecution arises for the word's sake, immediately they are offended.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

In original Greek, the word play works better than the KJV translation. The idea is that if you don't have a stable base or foundation ("roots," then you can easily stumble. The word "offended" means "to stumble" or "trip up." The verse does not say "because of the word" but rather "by the idea." So the sense is that the "word" or "idea" causes the pressure and harassment more directly As we saw in the previous verse, Mark 4:16, the issue of time from the rare word for "immediately" is important here. While the idea has time to grow here, the people with it immediately stumble at the first signs of opposition. The phrase "for the word's sake" is not what the Greek says at all,

Wordplay: 

Instead of stumbling over roots, we stumble without roots. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οὐκ (partic) "No" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative;

ἔχουσιν (verb 3rd pl pres ind act ) "They have" is from echo, which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ῥίζαν (noun sg fem acc) "Root" is rhiza, which means "root" and anything that springs from a root. It includes the roots of hairs, feathers, and teeth. It is also a metaphor for roots as a foundation, such as "the roots of the earth."

ἐν (prep) "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with".

ἑαυτοῖς (adj pl masc dat) "Themselves" is from heautou, is a reflexive pronoun that means "himself", "herself", "itself ""themselves," and "ourselves." It is an alternative to autos.

ἀλλὰ (conj) "And" is from alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

πρόσκαιρός (adj pl masc nom) "For a time" is from proskairos, which means "occasional", "temporary", "opportune," and "lasting for a time."

εἰσιν,  (verb 3rd pl pres ind act) "Endure" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

εἶτα  (adv) "Afterward," is from eita (eita), which means "then", "next", "presently," and "soon."

γενομένης (part sg aor mid fem gen) "Arises" is from ginomai, which means "to become", "to come into being", "to happen", "to be produced," and "to be." It means changing into a new state of being. It is the complementary opposite of the verb "to be" (eimi)which indicates existence in the same state.

θλίψεως (noun sg fem gen) "Tribulation" is from thlipsis, which means simply "pressure," or "crushing," and is a metaphor for "oppression" and "affliction."

 (conj) "Or" is which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." --

διωγμοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Persecution" is from diôgmos, which means "the chase", "pursuit," and "harassment."

διὰ (prep) "For" is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

τὸν λόγον (noun sg masc acc) "The word" is from logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion, ""reckoning," and "value." -- "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "explanation" or "calculation." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons.

εὐθὺς (adv) "Immediately" is from euthys, which means "straight", "direct," and "straight forward."

σκανδαλίζονται (verb 3rd pl pres ind mp) "They are offended" is from skandalizo, which means "to cause to stumble", "to give offense," and "to scandalize."

KJV Analysis: 

And The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

have The word translated as "have" means "to possess." "to hold," or "to keep.."

no The Greek word translated as "no" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

root "Root" is from the Greek word for a plant's "root" and anything that springs from a root. It includes the roots of hairs, feathers, and teeth. It is also a metaphor for roots as a foundation, such as "the roots of the earth."

in themselves,

and This "and" here is different than the first "and". It a conjunction that means "but," but also means "moreover", "still", "at least", "except," and, interestingly, "yet." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

so

endure The verb translated here as "endure"  is the common form of "to be" in Greek, It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

but There is no second "but" here, only the one translated as "and" above. 

for a time "For a time" is from an adjective that means "occasional", "temporary", "opportune," and "lasting for a time." It is in a form the refers to a masculine subject.

afterward, .The Greek word translated as "afterward" means "then", "next", "presently," and "soon."

when

affliction "Tribulation" is from a noun that means simply "pressure," or "crushing;" It is a metaphor for "oppression" and "affliction."

or "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primarily "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

persecution "Persecution" is from a noun which means "the chase", "pursuit," and "harassment."

ariseth "Ariseth" is from a verb in the form of an adjective (or noun), which means "to become," and "to come into existence, so "becoming" or "coming into being."

for The word translated as "for" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." This is not a word commonly translated as "for."

the word's "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it. 

sake, There is no word for "sake" in the Greek, though Jesus commonly uses such a verse. 

immediately "Immediately " is an adverb which means "straightly", "directly", "forthwith", "as soon as," and "straightway." In the last verse, Mat 13:20, it was translated as "anon."

they are offended The key phrase here, "they are offended," is from a "Greek" verb that means "to cause to stumble", "to give offense," and "to scandalize" and is found only in the Bible. It refers to putting a stumbling block before someone so that they trip and thereby offending them. In English, we would simply say, "trips you up." It is in a form indicating the subject doing something to himself or, in this case, themselves. 
 

Front Page Date: 

Jun 24 2019