Mark 14:21 The Son of man indeed goeth, as it is written of him:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because truly this child of the man goes away as it has been written concerning him. Too bad, however, for that man, that person by whom the child of the man is given over. It was for him if ne was not conceived, this man, that person.

KJV : 

Mark 14:21 The Son of man indeed goeth, as it is written of him: but woe to that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! good were it for that man if he had never been born.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

As we see, the beginning word "because" is usually left out because it makes it seem like this verse is the answer to a question. 

Here the wordplay is the repeated alternation of the phrases "the son of the man" and "the man." The second term describe the one who turns Jesus over to the authorities. This is completely lost in translation. The more modern translations especially edit out the play on words. Jesus begins this verse with "the son of the man" and ends it with "the man, that one."

This verse has a lot of repetition in it. Some of it is edited out in translation. The repeated use of the title, "the son of the man (see this article) is played with a little in the Greek, but that is lost in translation. What is also lost is the repeated use of "that person" after descriptions of the man who betrays him.

NIV : 

Mark 14:21 The Son of Man will go just as it is written about him. But woe to that man who betrays the Son of Man! It would be better for him if he had not been born.

NLT : 

Mark 14:21 For the Son of Man must die, as the Scriptures declared long ago. But how terrible it will be for the one who betrays him. It would be far better for that man if he had never been born!

Wordplay: 

Jesus contrasts the repeated "Son of the man" with the repeated "the man" referring to his betrayer.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅτι  (adv/conj) Untranslated is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore." -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

(article sg masc nom ) "The" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. Here it is separated from its noun by a particle.

μὲν (partic) "Indeed" is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly."

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant.

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ὑπάγει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Goeth" is from hupago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you."

καθὼς (adv) "As" is from kathos, which means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

γέγραπται (verb 3rd sg perf ind mp) "It is written" is from grapho which means "to mark", "to express by written characters", "to write a letter", "to write down [a law]", "to proscribe", "to ordain", "to write for oneself", "to enroll oneself", "to draw signs", "to describe a figure" "to brand," and "to indict."

περὶ  (prep) "Of" is from peri, which means "round about (Place)", "around", "about", "concerning", "on account of", "in regard to", "before", "above", "beyond," and "all around."

αὐτοῦ, (adj sg masc gen ) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

οὐαὶ (exclam) "Woe" is from ouai, which is an exclamation of pain or anger meaning "woe" or "alas" but it can be used sarcastically. --

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

τῷ (article sg masc dat) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἀνθρώπῳ (noun sg masc dat) "Unto...the man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐκείνῳ (adj sg masc dat) "That" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

δι᾽ (prep)  "Through" is from dia which means "through", "in the midst of", "in a line (movement)", "throughout (time)", "by (causal)", "among," and "between."

οὗ (pron sg masc gen) "Whom" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

υἱὸς (noun sg masc nom) "The Son" is from huios, which means a "son," and more generally, a "child." It is used generally to refer to any male descendant.

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

παραδίδοται: (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Is betrayed" is from paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow." --

καλὸν (adj sg neut nom) "Good" is from kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

ἦν (verb 3rd sg imperf ind act) "were it" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible."

αὐτῷ (adj sg neut/masc dat ) "for that man" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it."

εἰ (conj) "If" is from ei, which is the particle used to express conditions "if" (implying nothing about its fulfillment) or indirect questions, "whether." It also means "if ever", "in case," and "whenever." It is combined with various conjunctions to create derivative conditions.

οὐκ (partic)  "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐγεννήθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Born" is from gennaô (gennao), which means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", "to create," and "to engender." This is the causal form of gignomai, which is translated as "done" in the NT, but which comes closer in meaning to "become."

(article sg masc nom) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἄνθρωπος (noun sg masc nom) "He" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐκεῖνος. (adj sg masc nom) "That" is from ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

KJV Analysis: 

untranslated "because" -- (MW) The untranslated word introduces a statement of fact or cause: "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

indeed -- "Indeed" is a Greek word used express certainty that means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." This is the Greek counterpart of the Aramaic word, amen. More about that word and this in this article. This word was not translated in tbe KJV Matthew. This word appears between the "the" and "son" earlier in the sentence because, like a few other Greek words, it usually comes second in the clause.

goeth, -- "Goeth" is a verb that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Jesus usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

as -- "As" is an adverb that means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

is -- (WT) This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English. However, the tense here is the past perfect, so "has been."

written -- "Written" is a verb that means "to mark", "to express by written characters", and "to write down [a law]". However, the form of the word is not passive but a form where the subject acts on itself in a way completed in the past, "it has written itself."

of -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "of" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

him: -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. .

woe -- "Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." However, Christ seems to use it somewhat humorously. Most verses in which it appears have the hallmarks of Christ's humor. Today we would say "so sad " or "too bad." The word is very like the Jewish, "oy veh" which can be used to express sorry but with is more commonly used cynically. More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

to  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

that -- The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  It appears after the word as emphasis, not before.

man -- The word translated as "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here.

by The word translated as "by" means "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Here the sense is a cause.

whom -- The word translated as "whom" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

is --  This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English. The tense is the present.

betrayed! -- "Betrayed" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is in the form where the subject acts on himself, not a passive form. It has a lot of the same sense as we used "turned in" in English. It is the same word used in the previous two verses. The various biblical translations translate being it as "betray" or "delivered over" depending on the context. It has less of a sense of "betray," though giving someone over is similar to turning someone it. In looking through all the other uses of the word, he uses it consistently to mean being given over to authorities, most often state authorities. that is not the translation used for being given over to Christ by God or falling into the hands of authorities through court action.

good -- The word translated as "good" "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is different than the verb above. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Generally, "valuable" and "worthy" work in most of the places it is used, but perhaps not here.

were -- The "were" verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

it - This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

untranslated "him"  -- (MW)  The word "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. This is the dative for this verb.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. This word and its noun appear at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

that -- (WF) -- The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  This is the final word in the verse, following man and emphasizing it. 

man -- (WF) The word translated as "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here. This word appears at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

had -- (WT) This helping verb "had" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. This is not the tense of the verbs here.

never -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "never" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea. Our word "never" corresponds more to the Greek negative that uses both negative forms.

been -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

born. -- The word translated as "born" means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", and "to engender." The sense is "not been conceived."

KJV Translation Issues: 

7
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "is" seems to indicate the present tense, but the verb is past perfect, "has been written."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "of" is not the simple "of" but a word that means "about."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "that" is not the indirect object here, but the subject of the next verb.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "man" is not the indirect object here, but the subject of the next verb.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "never" here is an ordinary "not," not the more extreme Greek negative.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "because" -- (MW) The untranslated word introduces a statement of fact or cause: "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

will  -- (WT) This helping verb "will" indicates the future tense, but the verb is not the future.

go, -- "Go" is from a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

just-- "Just" is a Greek word used express certainty that means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." This is the Greek counterpart of the Aramaic word, amen. More about that word and this in this article. This word was not translated in tbe KJV Matthew. This word appears between the "the" and "son" earlier in the sentence because, like a few other Greek words, it usually comes second in the clause.

as -- "As" is an adverb that means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

is -- (WT) This helping verb "is" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English. However, the tense here is the past perfect, so "has been."

written -- "Written" is a verb that means "to mark", "to express by written characters", and "to write down [a law]". However, the form of the word is not passive but a form where the subject acts on itself in a way completed in the past, "it has written itself."

about - The Greek word translated as "about" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

him: -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. .

woe -- "Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." However, Christ seems to use it somewhat humorously. Most verses in which it appears have the hallmarks of Christ's humor. Today we would say "so sad " or "too bad." The word is very like the Jewish, "oy veh" which can be used to express sorry but with is more commonly used cynically. More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

to  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

that -- The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  It appears after the word as emphasis, not before.

man -- The word translated as "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here.

untranslated "through"-- (MW) The untranslated word "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Here the sense is a cause.

who -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

betrays -- (WF) "Betrays" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is in the form where the subject acts on himself, not a passive form. It has a lot of the same sense as we used "turned in" in English. It is the same word used in the previous two verses. The various biblical translations translate being it as "betray" or "delivered over" depending on the context. It has less of a sense of "betray," though giving someone over is similar to turning someone it. In looking through all the other uses of the word, he uses it consistently to mean being given over to authorities, most often state authorities. that is not the translation used for being given over to Christ by God or falling into the hands of authorities through court action. The verb is passive, not active. Its subject is "the son of the man."

The -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

would --  This helping verb indicates the past tense of the following verb.

be -- The "be" verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

better -- (WF) The word translated as "better" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is different than the verb above. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Generally, "valuable" and "worthy" work in most of the places it is used, but perhaps not here. This is not the comparative form.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

him  -- The word "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

had -- (WT) This helping verb "had" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past. This is not the tense of the verbs here.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea. Our word "never" corresponds more to the Greek negative that uses both negative forms.

been -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

born. -- The word translated as "born" means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", and "to engender." The sense is "not been conceived."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. This word and its noun appear at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

untranslated "man"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here. This word appears at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

untranslated "that"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  This is the final word in the verse, following man and emphasizing it. 

NIV Translation Issues: 

13
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "because" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "will" indicates the future tense but the verb is not the future.
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "is" seems to indicate the present tense, but the verb is past perfect, "has been written."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "through" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "betrays" is not an active verb but a passive one, "been betrayed."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "better" is not the comparative form but the simple "good."
  • WT - Wrong Tense - The verb "had" seems to indicate the past perfect tense, but the verb isn't that tense. tense.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

For --  This word introduces a statement of fact or cause: "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

Son -- The word translated as "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

of -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man -- The Greek word for "of man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

must -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "must" in the Greek source.

die, -- (CW) "Die" is from a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

just-- "Just" is a Greek word used express certainty that means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly." This is the Greek counterpart of the Aramaic word, amen. More about that word and this in this article. This word was not translated in tbe KJV Matthew. This word appears between the "the" and "son" earlier in the sentence because, like a few other Greek words, it usually comes second in the clause.

as -- "As" is an adverb that means "even as", "how", and, in relating to time, "as" and "when."

the Scriptures declared long ago -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "the Scriptures declared long ago" in the Greek source.

untranslated "written"-- (MW) The untranslated word Written" is a verb that means "to mark", "to express by written characters", and "to write down [a law]". However, the form of the word is not passive but a form where the subject acts on itself in a way completed in the past, "it has written itself."

untranslated "about"-- (MW) The untranslated word "about" means It means "around" when referring to a place, but, in this context, it means "about", "concerning", "on account of," and "in regard to." This is the way Christ usually uses it.

untranslated "him"-- (MW) The untranslated word "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.

But -- The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. .

how terrible -- "Woe" is from an exclamation of grief, meaning "woe" or "alas." However, Christ seems to use it somewhat humorously. Most verses in which it appears have the hallmarks of Christ's humor. Today we would say "so sad " or "too bad." The word is very like the Jewish, "oy veh" which can be used to express sorry but with is more commonly used cynically. More about this phrase in this article on Christ's humor, under the subtitle, "exaggeration."

it will be -- (IP) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "it will be " in the Greek source.

for  -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

the one -- This word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "that"-- (MW) The untranslated word "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  It appears after the word as emphasis, not before.

untranslated "man"-- (MW) The untranslated words "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here.

untranslated "through"-- (MW) The untranslated word "through," in the midst of," or "by (a cause)." Here the sense is a cause.

who -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

betrays -- (WF) "Betrays" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is in the form where the subject acts on himself, not a passive form. It has a lot of the same sense as we used "turned in" in English. It is the same word used in the previous two verses. The various biblical translations translate being it as "betray" or "delivered over" depending on the context. It has less of a sense of "betray," though giving someone over is similar to turning someone it. In looking through all the other uses of the word, he uses it consistently to mean being given over to authorities, most often state authorities. that is not the translation used for being given over to Christ by God or falling into the hands of authorities through court action. The verb is passive, not active. Its subject is "the son of the man."

him. -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "him" in the Greek source.

untranslated "the"-- (MW) The untranslated word "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "son"-- (MW) The untranslated word  "son" more generally means "child" or "descendant".

untranslated "the" -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "man"-- (MW) The untranslated word  "man" in the singular means "man," "person," and "humanity" and "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

It -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

would --  This helping verb indicates the past tense of the following verb.

be -- The "be" verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

far -- (IW) There is no Greek word that can be translated as "far" in the Greek source.

better -- (WF) The word translated as "better" means "beautiful", "noble," or "of good quality." It is different than the verb above. See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." Generally, "valuable" and "worthy" work in most of the places it is used, but perhaps not here. This is not the comparative form.

for -- This word "for" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, "at" or "on" a time, and an "in" for area of affect.

untranslated "him"  -- (MW)  The word "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. This is the dative for this verb.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. This word and its noun appear at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

that -- (WF) -- The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as being in a specific place or time from a word that means "there."  This is the final word in the verse, following man and emphasizing it. 

man -- (WF) The word translated as "man" is the same as the "man" in the "son of man." It is in the form of an indirect object, which we would usually use "for" in English here. This word appears at the end of the verse, not at this point in it as the subject of the final verb.

if -- The "if" here expresses a condition but it means nothing regarding whether that condition is met or not. It also means "if ever" and "whenever."

he -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the following verb.

had -- This helping verb "had" indicates that the following verb is the tense indicating an action competed in the past.

never -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "never" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea. Our word "never" corresponds more to the Greek negative that uses both negative forms.

been -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the following verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translated the Greek verb forms into English.

born. -- The word translated as "born" means "to beget", "to bring forth", "to produce from oneself", and "to engender." The sense is "not been conceived."

NLT Translation Issues: 

22
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "must" doesn't exist in the source.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "die" does not mean "die" but "depart." 
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "the Scriptures declared long ago" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "written" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "about" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IP - Inserted phrase-- The phrase "it will be" doesn't exist in the source.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "through" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "betrays" is not an active verb but a passive one, "been betrayed."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "son" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "far" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "better" is not the comparative form but the simple "good."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "him" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "that" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "man" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "never" indicates a stronger negative than the one used.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 21 2020