Mark 14:20 It is one of the twelve, that dippeth with me in the dish.

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

One of the twelve. the one dipping with me into this, in a bowl.

KJV : 

Mark 14:20  It is one of the twelve, that dippeth with me in the dish.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is a good example of how Bible translators prefer to create complete written sentences instead of capturing the spoken word (see this article).  All translations add words and change verbs to make this into a more grammatical question. However, it is a perfectly normal oral statement, especially as an answer to a question, . The written sentence is something slightly unnatural.

NIV : 

Mark 14:20 It is one of the Twelve...one who dips bread into the bowl with me.

NLT : 

Mark 14:20 It is one of the twelve, one who is dipping bread into the dish with me.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Εἷς ( noun sg masc nom ) "One" is heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." This adjective is irregular, having a number of forms depending on sex, number, and case: heis, henos, heni, hen, hena, mia, mias, miai, mian; hen, henos, hen.  --

τῶν ( article pl masc gen ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

δώδεκα, (numeral) "The twelve" is from dodeka, which is the number "twelve," and a noun meaning "a group of twelve."

( article sg masc nom) "That" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐμβαπτόμενος [2 verses] ( part sg pres mp masc nom ) "Dippeth" is from embapto, which means to "dip in." It is a compound word from en, meaning "in" and baptizo which means "to dip", "to plunge", "to be drenched", "to be drowned," and "getting in deep water."

μετ᾽ (prep) "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

ἐμοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". --  "My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὸ (article sg neut acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

[ἓν]  (prep) Untranslated is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". --

τρύβλιον: [2 verses](noun sg neut dat) "Dish" is from tryblion, which means "cup" or "bowl."

KJV Analysis: 

It -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source.

is -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

one The Greek word translated as "one " means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

of  -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

the-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. Here, it makes the following number act like a noun. Since the number doesn't have gender, number, or case, this information comes from the article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

twelve -- "Twelve" is from the Greek word for twelve.

that -- The word translated as "that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dippeth -- (WF) "Dippeth" is a verb that means to "dip in." It is in the form of an adjective, "dipping in," used as a noun, "the one dipping in." This is an uncommon word for Christ and a somewhat unusual one in Greek.  The verb is a little different than Matthew because it has the person acting on himself. This is not an active verb but an adjective, "dipping."

with -- "With" is the Greek word that usually means "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit.

me  -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

in -- The word translated as "in" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "in" -- (MW) In some versions there is another "in" here. The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

dish. -- "Dish" is from a word that ch means "cup" or "dish." It is an uncommon word, not the one that Christ usually uses for cup or platter.

KJV Translation Issues: 

4
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "dippeth" is not an active verb but a participle, "dipping."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "in" is not shown in the English translation. However, it doesn't appear in some source texts.

NIV Analysis: 

It -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source.

is -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

one The Greek word translated as "one " means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

of  -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

the-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. Here, it makes the following number act like a noun. Since the number doesn't have gender, number, or case, this information comes from the article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

twelve -- "Twelve" is from the Greek word for twelve.

one who -- The word translated as "one who" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

dips --- (WF) "Dips" is a verb that means to "dip in." It is in the form of an adjective, "dipping in," used as a noun, "the one dipping in." This is an uncommon word for Christ and a somewhat unusual one in Greek.  The verb is a little different than Matthew because it has the person acting on himself. This is not an active verb but an adjective, "dipping."

bread -- -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "bread" in the Greek source.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "in" -- (MW) In some versions there is another "in" here. The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

bowl. -- "Bowl" is from a word that ch means "cup" or "dish." It is an uncommon word, not the one that Christ usually uses for cup or platter.

with -- "With" is the Greek word that usually means "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit.

me  -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

NIV Translation Issues: 

5
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "dippeth" is not an active verb but a participle, "dipping."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "bowl" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "in" is not shown in the English translation. However, it doesn't appear in some source texts.

NLT Analysis: 

It -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "it" in the Greek source.

is -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

one The Greek word translated as "one " means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same."As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

of  -- This word "of"  comes from the genitive case of the following word that required the addition of a preposition in English.  The most common is the "of" of possession,

the-- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. Here, it makes the following number act like a noun. Since the number doesn't have gender, number, or case, this information comes from the article.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

twelve -- "Twelve" is from the Greek word for twelve.

one who -- The word translated as "one who" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

is -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "is" in the Greek source.

dipping --- "Dipping" is a verb that means to "dip in." It is in the form of an adjective, "dipping in," used as a noun, "the one dipping in." This is an uncommon word for Christ and a somewhat unusual one in Greek.  The verb is a little different than Matthew because it has the person acting on himself. This is not an active verb but an adjective, "dipping."

bread -- -- (IW) There are no Greek words that can be translated as "bread" in the Greek source.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

untranslated "in" -- (MW) In some versions there is another "in" here. The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

dish. -- "Dish" is from a word that ch means "cup" or "dish." It is an uncommon word, not the one that Christ usually uses for cup or platter.

with -- "With" is the Greek word that usually means "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "by the means of". It also refers to "after" or "behind" when referring to a place, time, or pursuit.

me  -- "Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

NLT Translation Issues: 

4
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "it" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "is" doesn't exist in the source and isn't otherwise justified.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The preposition "in" is not shown in the English translation. However, it doesn't appear in some source texts.

Front Page Date: 

Jan 20 2020