Matthew 10:24 The disciple is not above [his] master

Spoken to: 

Apostles

Context: 

Sending of Apostles, the student's situation

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

There isn't really a student above the teacher nor a bondsman above the owner.

KJV : 

Matthew 10:24 The disciple is not above his master, nor the servant above his lord.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Jesus contrasts two ideas here:

  1. the difference in knowledge between one who learns one who teaches and,
  2. the difference in authority between a slave and his owner.

He contrast the same Greek terms in a number of other verses making this same point.

In the earlier verse, Matthew 10:22, the word "under" or "beneath" was emphasized. In this verse, the focus on its opposite, "above." Followers were beneath in that verse and their master is above them in this verse.

NIV : 

Matthew 10:24 The student is not above the teacher, nor a servant above his master.

NLT : 

Matthew 10:24 Students are not greater than their teacher, and slaves are not greater than their master.

My Takeaway: 

Hierarchies exist naturally among people.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὐκ (partic) "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective. More on the Greek negatives in this article.

ἔστιν (3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative. -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are."

μαθητὴς (noun sg masc nom) "Disciple" is from mathetes, which means "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice."

ὑπὲρ (prep) "Above" is from hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -

διδάσκαλον (noun sg masc acc) "Master" is from didaskalos, which means "teacher", "master", "trainer," and "producer."

οὐδὲ (partic) "Nor" is from a Greek negative meaning "but not" and as both parts of "neither...nor."

δοῦλος (noun sg masc nom) "The servant" is from doulos, which means a "slave," a "born bondsman," or "one made a slave."

ὑπὲρ (prep) "Above" is from hyper (huper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

τὸν (article sg masc acc)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

κύριον (noun sg masc acc) "Lord" is from kyrios  which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of

αὐτοῦ. (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

KJV Analysis: 

The -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source,  but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

disciple  -- "Disciple" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This can also be translated as "there is."

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Read more about the Greek negatives here.

above -- "Above" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

his -- (WW) The word translated as "his" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

master, -- (WW) The word translated as "master" specifically means "teacher." It is a Greek verb that means "to teach." This is not the common word for "master," which is used later in the verse.

nor -- "Nor" is a word means "but not", "neither", "nor," and "not even."

the -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source,  but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

servant -- "Servant" means "a born slave," or "a bondsman."

above -- "Above" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word Christ commonly uses at the 3rd person pronoun. Since the word follows the noun, the sense is "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

lord. -- "Lord" is from the Greek that means "master," "owner", "one in authority," and "one who has power." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the word translated as "Lord" when referring to God.

KJV Translation Issues: 

5
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be "a."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "his" should be "the."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "master" should be "teacher."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be "a."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NIV Analysis: 

The -- (WW) There is no Greek article "the" here in the source,  but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation.

student -- "Student" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept.

is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This can also be translated as "there is."

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Read more about the Greek negatives here.

above -- "Above" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

teacher, -- (The word translated as "teacher" specifically means "teacher." It is a Greek verb that means "to teach." This is not the common word for "master," which is used later in the verse.

nor -- "Nor" is a word means "but not", "neither", "nor," and "not even."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. .

servant -- "Servant" means "a born slave," or "a bondsman."

above -- "Above" is a preposition that means "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word Christ commonly uses at the 3rd person pronoun. Since the word follows the noun, the sense is "of his."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

lord. -- "Lord" is from the Greek that means "master," "owner", "one in authority," and "one who has power." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the word translated as "Lord" when referring to God.

NIV Translation Issues: 

2
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "the" should be "a."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

NLT Analysis: 

Students -- (WN) "Students" is from the Greek meaning "learner", "pupil", "student," and "apprentice." "Disciple" is a religious spin on this concept. The word is singular, not plural.

are -- (WN) The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. This can also be translated as "there is." The word is singular, not plural.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Read more about the Greek negatives here.

greater -- (WW) "Greater" is a preposition that means "above," "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

their -- (WW) The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

teacher, -- (The word translated as "teacher" specifically means "teacher." It is a Greek verb that means "to teach." This is not the common word for "master," which is used later in the verse.

and -- (WW) "And" is a word means "but not", "neither", "nor," and "not even."

a -- There is no indefinite article in Greek, but when a word doesn't have a definite article, the indefinite article can be added in English translation. .

slaves --  (WN)  "Slaves " means "a born slave," or "a bondsman."

greater -- (WW) "Greater" is a preposition that means "above," "over", "more than," and in position, "above." Here, it has the sense of having authority over. It is the opposite of the preposition used in Matthew 10:22.

their -- (WN) The word translated as "his" is the Greek word Christ commonly uses at the 3rd person pronoun. Since the word follows the noun, the sense is "of his." The word is singular, not plural.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

lord. -- "Lord" is from the Greek that means "master," "owner", "one in authority," and "one who has power." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the word translated as "Lord" when referring to God.

NLT Translation Issues: 

10
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "students" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "are" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "greater" should be "above."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "their" should be "the."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "and" should be "nor."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "sales" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "greater" should be "above."
  • WN  - Wrong Number- The word "their" is translated as plural but it is singular.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" is not shown in the English translation.

The Spoken Version: 

“If our Master is a child,” joked Lover Boy, “we students are the little kids.”
“Until we know more that he does,” suggested Handsome.
“No,” the Master said, finally responding, “There is no student above the teacher.”
“I consider myself more of a slave that a student,” offered the Rock.
“Nor a slave above the owner,” added the Mastear.
“In a way, we are all childlike compared to the Master,” suggested Brother James. “Netter is timid child. Rock, the bully. The Greek is the smart kid. Lover Boy the smarty pants.

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Sep 9 2020