Matthew 15:13 Every plant, which my heavenly Father

KJV Verse: 

Mat 15:13 Every plant, which my heavenly Father hath not planted, shall be uprooted.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Every generation that my universal Father has not fathered is going to be rooted out.

Every production that my universal Father has not produced is going to be rooted out.

Every cycle of crops where my universal Father has not planted [the trees] is going to be rooted out.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

While Jesus often uses symbols or, as he says, figures of speech, this verse has several meaning right on the surface. Indeed, the KJV may pull the symbols out of a verse where the plain meaning is right on the surface.

The word translated as "every" is a word meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas.

"Plant" is translated from a Greek word that doesn't mean "a plant" but "planting", "generation," and "production." It has the sense of one crop in a cycle of crops, one harvest in a cycle of harvests. Symbolically, agriculture and wealth all belong to Christ's realm of thought as an achievement the mind.

The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun, but it often acts as a pronoun, especially a connective pronoun introducing a dependent clause.

"Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

"Heavenly" is from an adjective that Christ rarely uses. Usually he say "in the heavens," (plural), but here he uses an adjective form. As with the word "heaven," his meaning is closer to our idea of the universe, that which is not on our planet.

The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact.

"Hath planted" is from a verb which means "beget", "engender," generally, "produce", "bring about", "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in, ""to plant {especially trees", "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents."

"Shall be rooted up" is from a verb

which means "to root out." It is the future passive, "is going to be rooted out." .

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πᾶσα (adj sg fem nom ) "Every" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

φυτεία ( noun sg fem nom ) "Plant" is from phuteia, which doesn't mean "a plant" (except as translated here) but "planting", "generation," and "production." It has the sense of one crop in a cycle of crops, one harvest in a cycle of harvests.

ἣν (pron sg fem acc) "Which" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

οὐκ "Not" is from ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐφύτευσεν (3rd sg aor ind act) "Hath planted" is from phyteuo, which means "beget", "engender," generally, "produce", "bring about", "cause (mostly of evils), "implant in," "to plant {especially trees", "to set-up," and specifically, "to plant with trees." When used as a noun, means "father" or, in plural, "parents."

πατήρ (noun sg masc nom) "The Father" is from pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the common word that Christ uses to address his own father, though it can mean any male ancestor.

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is from emou, which means "me", and "mine"

οὐράνιος (adj sg masc nom) "Heavenly" is from the Greek ouranios, an adjective meaning "heavenly", "dwelling in heaven", "in or of heaven", "reaching to heaven", "high as heaven", "sky-blue (of color)", "from the point of view of heaven," and a metaphor for "mountainous," and "colossal."

ἐκριζωθήσεται. (verb 3rd sg fut ind pass) "Shall be rooted up" is from ekrizoo, which means "to root out."

Wordplay: 

The entire phrase is a multiple play on words mixing agriculture with generations of people and their products. 

 

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