Matthew 7:12 Therefore all things whatsoever that you want

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

Sermon on Mount, law and fulfillment, visible and hidden, trust and doubt, requesting and getting

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

All things, in fact. As much as. When you might desire that they might make for you, those people. So much also you yourselves must make for them. Because this is the law and the prophets.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:12 Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is the famous Golden Rule, but it has been seriously changed in translation to say what the translators wanted, not what the Greek recorded. The NIV version may sound the most familiar but it it leaves most of the Greek out of the verse.  The Greek describes an economic law of reciprocity more than it does a moral "Golden Rule" of thoughtfulness.

The verse starts with a pair of Greek words that seem like disconnected comments. This is paved over by adding a "whatsoever" that does not exist in the source connecting these two words to the rest of the sentence.  but to make this work the "if" that starts the message must be left off.  Without this "if,"  or "when," at the beginning, the rest of the message cannot be understood properly. 

Using this primary meaning, this phrase becomes: "people should produce for you...you should produce for them." This describes a very modern economic message of people exchanging value.

NIV : 

Matthew 7:12 Do to others whatever you would like them to do to you. This is the essence of all that is taught in the law and the prophets.

My Takeaway: 

We get what we give. We can get as much as only to the extent we can give others what they want.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Πάντα (adj pl neut nom/acc)"All things" is from from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

οὖν (adv) "Therefore" is from oun, which means "certainly", "in fact", "really", "in fact," "so" and "then" (continuing a narrative), and "then" and "therefore."

ὅσα (adj pl neut nom/acc) "Whatsoever" is from hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as."

ἐὰν (conj) Untranslated is ean, which is a conditional particle (derived from ei (if) and an (might) which makes reference to a time and experience in the future that introduces but does not determine an event. It indicates something that probably will happen but is not certain to happen.

θέλητε (2nd pl pres subj act) "Ye would" is from thelo, which as a verb means "to be willing", "to wish", "to ordain", "to decree", "to be resolved to a purpose" and "to desire." As an adjective, it means "wished for" and "desired."

ἵνα (conj/adv) "That" is from hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

ποιῶσιν (3rd pl pres subj act) "Should do" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "To you" is from humin, which is the 2nd person plural dative pronoun.

οἱ (article)  Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). --

ἄνθρωποι, (noun pl masc nom ) "Men" is from anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

οὕτως (adv) "So" is from houtos, which as an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

καὶ (conj) "Even" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "You" is from humeis which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

ποιεῖτε (2nd pl pres imperat act) "Do" is from poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

αὐτοῖς: (adj pl masc dat) "Them" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

οὗτος (adj sg masc nom ) "This" is from houtos, which means "this", "that", "the nearer."

γάρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

ἐστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

(article sg  masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

νόμος (noun sg masc nom) "The law" is from nomos, which means "anything assigned", "a usage", "custom", "law", "ordinance," or "that which is a habitual practice." It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal."

καὶ (conj) "Even" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

οἱ (article pl masc nom)  "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"). 

προφῆται. (noun pl masc nom) "The prophets" is from prophetes, which means "one who speaks for a god and interprets his will", "interpreter", "keepers of the oracle", "the highest level of priesthood in Egypt", "interpreter," and "herald."

KJV Analysis: 

Therefore  - The Greek word translated either as "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative. This verse seems more of a change in topic, rather than a continuation of the last verse's narrative, Matthew 7:11, so this seems to have the sense of "certainly." This all makes more sense if wadding emphasis.

all  - The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." It is plural and the form can be either the subject or the object of the verb.

things  - There is no word, "things," in the Greek source, but this word comes from the neutral, plural form of the previous adjective.

whatsoever  -  (WW) The word translated as "whatsoever" means "as great as", "as much as", and similar ideas of comparison.

untranslated "when"-- (MW) The untranslated word "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

would  - (CW, WF) The Greek word translated as "would" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. This word's primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to want," "to desire," "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". The form indicates a possibility so, without the "if," it needs a "might" or
should" before it. The sense is "you should want." However, the "if" requires this form and in English, a verb is understood to "might" happen.

that  - The word translated as "that" is an adverb or a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause "there", "where," and "in order that."

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

men  - The Greek word for "men" means "person" and "humanity" in the singular and "people" and "peoples" in the plural. Jesus often uses it to mean "people" in the sense that we say "other people".

should  - The following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more needed if not in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

do  - (CW) The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "performing," "causing" or "rendering" as service. The idea is not "do" in the general sense in English of "acting upon" a person. The form is one of possibility, "should perform" or "should make."

to -- (CW) This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common but the sense of the sentence is "for" a benefit.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

missing "yourselves" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "you yourselves." This pronoun precedes the verb, further emphasizing it.

do - (CW,) The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "performing," "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is in the form of a command or request. In English, commands don't have an explicit subject, the "you" is usually understood. However, this sentence has an explicit subject, the "yourselves" above. This works better in English if we say "You must make..."

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

even -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also," "even", and "just."). This conjunction appears before the subject and the verb above.

so -- (CW, WP) The word translated as "so" is an adverbial form that means "to such an extent" and "so much". This word appears before the conjunction at the verb start of the clause.

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common.

them: -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  

for  - The word translated as "for" means "since" or because".

this is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

law -- The Greek word translated as "law" describes the social norms, which can be from "tradition", "common practice," or the "laws." Jesus also uses it to refer to the first five books of the OT written by Moses.  It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also," "even", and "just."). This conjunction appears before the subject and the verb above.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophets. -- The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God", "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople but their books in the OT. It is derived from a verb that means "to shine before." So in English, we might say "shining lights".

KJV Translation Issues: 

12
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "whatsoever" should be "as much as."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" or "if" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "would" means "want" or "desire."
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "would" is not a simple action, but something that "should" or "might" be done.  However, with an "if" or "when" the "might" is assumed in English.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "men" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "do" means "produce" or "perform."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" should probably be "for."
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "you yourselves."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "do" means "produce" or "perform."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "even" doesn't appear here but before the verb and subject after the following word.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "so" should probably be "so much."
  • WP -- Wrongly Placed -- The word "so" ("so much") doesn't appear here but before the verb and subject at the very beginning of the clause.

NIV Analysis: 

untranslated "therefore"-- (MW) The untranslated word "therefore" either emphasizes the truth of something ("certainly", "really") or it simply continues an existing narrative. This verse seems more of a change in topic, rather than a continuation of the last verse's narrative, Matthew 7:11, so this seems to have the sense of "certainly." This all makes more sense if wadding emphasis.

untranslated "as much as"-- (MW) The untranslated word "as much as" means "as great as", "as much as", and similar ideas of comparison.

untranslated "when"-- (MW) The untranslated word "if might" indicates more of an expectation of something happening than "if" alone. This is often how we use the word "when".

missing "yourselves" -- (MW)  The subjective pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "you yourselves." This pronoun precedes the verb, further emphasizing it.

Do -  (CW,) The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "performing," "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is in the form of a command or request. In English, commands don't have an explicit subject, the "you" is usually understood. However, this sentence has an explicit subject, the "yourselves" above. This works better in English if we say "You must make..."

to - (CW) This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common but the sense of the sentence is "for" a benefit.

untranslated "the"  -- (MW) The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

others - (WW) The Greek word for "others" means "man," "person" and "humanity" in the singular and "men," "people" and "peoples" in the plural.

whatever - (WW) The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." It is plural and the form can be either the subject or the object of the verb.

untranslated "that"-- (MW) The untranslated word "that" is an adverb or a conjunction that starts a subordinate clause "there", "where," and "in order that."

you -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

would -- (CW) The Greek word translated as "would" is not the same as the helper verb "will" in English, which primarily expresses the future tense. This helping verb in English should be from the form of the Greek verb that indicates a possibility. We would usually say "might" or "should" in English.

like - This word's primary purpose is to express consent and even a delight in doing something. It means "to want," "to desire," "to consent" and "to be resolved to a purpose". The form indicates a possibility so, without the "if," it needs a "might" or should" before it. The sense is "you should want." However, the "if" requires this form and in English, a verb is understood to "might" happen.

them -- This is from the third-person, plural form of the verb.

to -- This "to" is added because the infinitive form of the verb requires a "to" in English.

untranslated "also"  -- (MW) The untranslated word "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also," "even", and "just."). This conjunction appears before the subject and the verb above.

do - (CW) The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "performing," "causing" or "rendering" as service. The idea is not "do" in the general sense in English of "acting upon" a person. The form is one of possibility, "should perform" or "should make."

to -- (CW) This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object is the most common but the sense of the sentence is "for" a benefit.

you, -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc. 

This is the essence of all that is taught in the law and the prophets.

ye

would 

should  - The following verb describes a possibility, the subjunctive voice. A "might" or "should" in English is more needed if not in an "if" or "when" clause. Helping verbs are not needed in Greek since the main verb carries this information in its form.

do 

do - (CW,) The Greek word translated as "do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "performing," "causing" or "rendering" as service. It is in the form of a command or request. In English, commands don't have an explicit subject, the "you" is usually understood. However, this sentence has an explicit subject, the "yourselves" above. This works better in English if we say "You must make..."

ye -- This is from the second-person, plural form of the verb.

even -- (WP) The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also," "even", and "just."). This conjunction appears before the subject and the verb above.

so -- (CW, WP) The word translated as "so" is an adverbial form that means "to such an extent" and "so much". This word appears before the conjunction at the verb start of the clause.

them: -- The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English.  

for  - The word translated as "for" means "since" or because".

this is -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  When the verb "to be" appears early in the clause before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." 

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

law -- The Greek word translated as "law" describes the social norms, which can be from "tradition", "common practice," or the "laws." Jesus also uses it to refer to the first five books of the OT written by Moses.  It is the basis of the English words "norm" and "normal."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also," "even", and "just."). This conjunction appears before the subject and the verb above.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. 

prophets. -- The Greek word translated as "prophets" means "one who speaks for God", "interpreter" and was the highest level of priesthood in Egypt. Christ uses it to refer not only to divine spokespeople but their books in the OT. It is derived from a verb that means "to shine before." So in English, we might say "shining lights".

NIV Translation Issues: 

14
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "therefore" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "as much as" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "when" or "if" is not shown in the English translation.
  • MW -- Missing Word  -- The pronoun repeats the information in the verb so it should be repeated in English like "you yourselves."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "do" means "produce" or "perform."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" should probably be "for."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "the" before "men" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "others" should be "men."
  • WW - Wrong Word -- The word translated as "whatever" should be "all."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word "as much as" is not shown in the English translation.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "would" is not a simple action, but something that "should" or "might" be done.  However, with an "if" or "when" the "might" is assumed in English.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "do" means "produce" or "perform."
  • MW - Missing Word -- The word " also" is not shown in the English translation.
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "to" should probably be "for."

The Spoken Version: 

“But food, drink, and clothing are made by people,” an aging woman called out. “The Divine may know we need them, but what things can he help us produce?”
We witnesses never discovered this woman’s name, but we just called her the Green Shawl because she wore a green wrap over her shoulders.
“All things, in fact,” the Teacher assured her.
“As much as we need?”Green Shawl asked as she spread her slim arms wide to show how much.   
“As much as!” the Teacher assured her, spreading his arms even wider.
“How do all of us get what we desire?” she inquired doubtfully, indicating the crowd.
Others in the crowd supported her in the question.  
“When you all desire,” he said, addressing us, “what they might produce for you all? These people?” He again indicated the whole crowd, “So much?” He held his hands wide apart. “As much also you yourselves must produce,” he again indicated the crowd, “for them!”
“But how is this consistent with them traditional law?” Green Shawl responded sounding doubtful.
“Because this,” the Teacher said happily, “is the law!”
“But this is not our law as the Distinguished teach it,” retorted the woman. “Other than you, who else also teaches this?”
“Also?” the Teacher responded as if the question was puzzling.
He paused, looked down, and rubbed his chin as it thinking. Then he looked up, tapping his head, his eyes wide as if he had a realization.
“The luminaries!” he exclaimed.  
Many laughed and applauded, but this was too much for the Distinguished.

evidence: 

93.00

Front Page Date: 

Jul 7 2020