Matthew 7:8 For every one that asketh receiveth;

Spoken to: 

audience

Context: 

The Sermon on the Mount, visible and invisible, trusting

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because every one asking, gets [now], and the one searching find s[now]. And to the one knocking, it will [in the future] be opened.

KJV : 

Matthew 7:8 For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse is a reuse of the verbs used in the previous verse, Matthew 7:7. The changes are the verb forms. The commands in the previous verse become participles acting as subjects or indirect objects in this verse. Instead of the plural "you" of the previous verse and following verse, everything here is in the singular. There are no pronouns here at all, just different forms of verbs and the singular articles ("the") acting like pronouns. 

This verse primarily consists of six verbs as did the last verse. Three of them are in the form of participles with articles before them, acting as nouns, two subjects and an indirect object. The first two of three  active verbs are in the present tense. The present tense in Greek has more of a sense of "now" than English because they have a special tense, the aorist, to indicate some general point in time. We use the present tense fo that. So, in the Greek, those asking are getting now, and those searching are finding now.  One the last verb is in the future next as a passive, "will be opened" or "will be disclosed.

The two words translated as "ask," and "seek," have secondary meanings of "desire" or "crave". Since they are both commands, there is a strong sense that we are must desire a specific goal in order to take the actions to get them.

NIV : 

Matthew 7:8 For everyone who asks receives; the one who seeks finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.

Wordplay: 

 All the terms in this verse have several double meanings. They relate to desiring, experimentation, testing, and discovery, and the human mind.

My Takeaway: 

As long ask, seek, and knock, we are always getting, finding, but it only open in the future. 

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

πᾶς (adj sg masc nom) "Every" is from pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything."

γὰρ (adv) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question it means "why" and "what."

(article sg masc nom) "one that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it makes the following participle into a noun.

αἰτῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Ask" is from aiteo, which means "to ask", "to demand", "to beg", "to claim," and "to ask for one's own use."

λαμβάνει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Receiveth" is from lambano means to "take", "take hold of", "grasp", "seize", "catch", "overtake", "find out", "detect", "take as", "take [food or drugs]", "understand", "take in hand", "undertake", "take in", "hold", "get", "receive [things]", "receive hospitably", "receive in marriage", "receive as produce", "profit", "admit", "initiate", "take hold of", "lay hold on", "seize and keep hold of", "obtain possession of", "lay hands upon", "find fault with", "censure," "to apprehend with the senses", "to take hold of," and "to seize." It is also specifically used to mean "seized with emotion."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

(article sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it makes the following participle into a noun.

ζητῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Seeketh" is from zeteo, which means "inquire for", "search for", "seek after", "desire", and "feel the want of."

εὑρίσκει (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Findeth" is from heurisko, which means "to find", "to find out", "to discover", "to devise", "to invent", "to get," and "to gain."

καὶ (conj) "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

τῷ (part sg pres act masc dat) "To him that" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it makes the following participle into a noun.

κρούοντι (part sg pres act masc dat) "to him that knocketh" is from krouo, which means to "strike", "smite", "strike one against another", "strike together", "knocking", "examine", "try", "prove," and "knock at the door [on the outside]."

ἀνοιγήσεται. (3rd sg fut ind pass) "It shall be opened" is from anoigo, which means "to open", "to throw open," and "to disclose."

KJV Analysis: 

For  - The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "since", "because", or "so". It always appears in the second position in the phrase, so it acts as an aside, as we might say "--because of this--. 

every  - "Every" is translated from a Greek word that means "all" or "whole. It is singular.

one  - The word translated as "one that" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it is the subject of the phrase. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

asketh  - (WF) The verb "asketh" also has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It is in the form of an adjective, "asking". With the introductory article "the one asking."

receiveth;  - -- The word translated as "receiveth" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and". In a series, as it is here,  is sometimes best translated as "not only...but also."

he  -- (CW) The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. This is not the pronoun, but the article is masculine. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

seeketh  - (WF) The verb "seeketh" also means "search", "desire", and "feel the want of". It is in an adjective form, "seeking" or "desiring".  It acts as part of the subject of the sentence. With the introductory article, "the one seeking" or "the one desiring". 

findeth;  - The term used for "findeth" is the source of our word, "heuristic." It means "find out" and "discover."  Its sense is enabling a person to find out something for themselves.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and". In a series, as it is here,  is sometimes best translated as "not only...but also."

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

him -- (CW) The word translated as "him" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. This is not the pronoun, but the article is masculine. 

that -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "that" in the Greek source.

knocketh  -- (WF) The word translated as "knock" also means "to examine" and "to prove.  It is in the form of an adjective, "knocking," used as an indirect object not the subject of the verb. Both the adjective and the preceding article ("the") are in the form of indirect objects, so "to the one knocking".

it -- This is from the third-person, singular form of the verb.

shall -- This helping verb "shall" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.  -

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

opened.   - The term for "open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." Unlike most of this verse, this verb is passive, "be disclosed" or "be opened". The tense is the future, "going to be disclosed". The form of this verb is exactly the same as in the previous verse.

KJV Translation Issues: 

8
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" before "ask" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "ask" is not an active verb but a participle, "asking."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not a pronoun but an article, "the one."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" before "seek" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "seek" is not an active verb but a participle, "seeking."
  • CW - Confusing Word -- The "he" is not a pronoun but an article, "the one."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" before "knock" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "knock" is not an active verb but a participle, "knocking."

NIV Analysis: 

For  - The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "since", "because", or "so". It always appears in the second position in the phrase, so it acts as an aside, as we might say "--because of this--. 

every-  - "Every" is translated from a Greek word that means "all" or "whole. It is singular.

-one  - The word translated as "one that" is from the Greek article, "the," which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Here it is the subject of the phrase. 

who -- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source.

asks - (WF) The verb "asks" also has shades of meaning from "demand" to "claim." It is in the form of an adjective, "asking". With the introductory article "the one asking."

receives;  - -- The word translated as "receives" primarily means "take." However, it means "receive" in the same sense that we use "get" to mean "receive" and has many different uses as we use "get" in English. Among these are the ideas of "understanding" and "possessing."

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and". In a series, as it is here,  is sometimes best translated as "not only...but also."

the one -- The word translated as "he" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. This is not the pronoun, but the article is masculine. 

who-- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source.

seeks  - (WF) The verb "seeks" also means "search", "desire", and "feel the want of". It is in an adjective form, "seeking" or "desiring".  It acts as part of the subject of the sentence. With the introductory article, "the one seeking" or "the one desiring". 

finds;  - The term used for "finds" is the source of our word, "heuristic." It means "find out" and "discover."  Its sense is enabling a person to find out something for themselves.

and  - The Greek word translated as "and" repeatedly here is used as the conjunction "and". In a series, as it is here,  is sometimes best translated as "not only...but also."

to -- This word "to" comes from the dative case of the following word that requires the addition of a preposition in English, but the translator must decide which preposition to use: a "to" as an indirect object.

the one -- The word translated as "the one " is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those") that the English "the." See this article for more. This is not the pronoun, but the article is masculine. 

and towho knocks, the door will be opened.

who-- (IW) There is nothing that can be translated as "who" in the Greek source.

knocks  -- (WF) The word translated as "knocks" also means "to examine" and "to prove.  It is in the form of an adjective, "knocking," used as an indirect object not the subject of the verb. Both the adjective and the preceding article ("the") are in the form of indirect objects, so "to the one knocking".

the door --  (IP) There is nothing that can be translated as "the door" in the Greek source.

will -- This helping verb "will" indicates that the verb is the future tense. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.  -

be -- This helping verb "be" indicates that the verb is passive. Helping or auxiliary verbs are needed to translate the Greek verb forms into English.

opened.   - The term for "open" means "to disclose" or "to lay open." Unlike most of this verse, this verb is passive, "be disclosed" or "be opened". The tense is the future, "going to be disclosed". The form of this verb is exactly the same as in the previous verse.

NIV Translation Issues: 

7
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "that" before "ask" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "ask" is not an active verb but a participle, "asking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" before "seek" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "seek" is not an active verb but a participle, "seeking."
  • IW - Inserted Word -- The word "who" before "knock" doesn't exist in the source.
  • WF - Wrong Form -  The "knock" is not an active verb but a participle, "knocking."
  • IP - Inserted Phrase-- The phrase "the door" doesn't exist in the source.

The Spoken Version: 

“Why ask about this realm of yours? I don’t get it!” another man called out.
“Because everyone asking gets!” the Teacher explained, smiling broadly and tapped his forehead.  “And the one searching?” he added, closing his eyes and stretching his arms out like a blind man.  Then he opened his eyes and added, “He discovers!”
We laughed and clapped.

“Are you saying my mind is closed?” the man asked sounding a bit angry,  tapping a fist to the side of his head.
The Master laughed and shook his head, no.
“And to the one knocking?” the Teacher answered happily, copying the man’s gesture. “It will be opened!”

evidence: 

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Front Page Date: 

Jul 4 2020