Matthew 25:15 And unto one he gave five talents,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:15 And unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And, indeed, to this one he gave five hundred dollars, to this one, two hundred dollars, and to another a single hundred; to each according to his personal capacity; and he went abroad.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The only thing hidden here is that an important word in this verse and the last Mat 25:14, that is simply translated as "his.' This word is a key idea here.

The word translated as "unto one" three time is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("this one"). Here it is in the form of an indirect object, one who receives something.

There is an untranslated word here that means "indeed" or "truly". It is the Greek equivalent of the word "amen."

The verb translated as "he gave" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

The word translated as "talents" is not the word for any specific amount of money, but the word that means "weight", "a pair of scales," and "sum of money." As money, the amount varied in different systems. A hundred dollars in today's money seems to capture the sense. The "bags of gold" used by some translations is far too much money, since any bag of gold in any era would be worth thousands. In Mat 18:24, Christ describes a slave (a servant) as owing ten thousand talents, which, if a "talent" is a hundred dollars, would be a million dollars. This seems a reasonable scale.

"To every man" is translated from a Greek word meaning "each", "all and each severally," and "each by himself."

"According" is from a word that primarily means "downwards", "against", but in this context means "in accordance with", "concerning", and "corresponding with."

The word translated as "his" is a very unusual word. It is not the very common pronoun usually translated as "his," but a specific word that means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself," and "private."

"Ability" is from a word that describes abilities and capacities, what actions a person can do or has done so "power", "might", "influence", "authority," and "force." It is usually translated as "power" or "authority" in the NT, but "capacity" and "ability" are perhaps closer to the way Christ uses it.

There is no Greek word translated as "immediately" in today's Greek source.

The uncommon verb translated as "took his journey" was translated as "traveling to a far country" in the pervious verse. It means "to be far from home" and "to go abroad."

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but."

(pron sg masc dat) "Unto one" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

μὲν Untranslated is men, which is generally used to express certainty and means "indeed", "certainly", "surely," and "truly."

ἔδωκεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "He gave" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

πέντε (number) "Five" is from pente, the number five.

τάλαντα (noun pl neut acc) "Talent" is from talanton, which means "a weight", "a pair of scales", "a commercial weight," and "a sum of money." In Greek mythology, it was the scales on which Zeus balanced the fortuns of men. As money, the amount varied in different systems.

(pron sg masc dat) "To another" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause..

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

δύο"Two" is from duo, which means the number "two", "a couple," and "a pair." -- The Greek word for "two" means "two" or a "couple."

(pron sg masc dat) "To another" is from hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause..

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἕν, (noun sg neut acc) "One" is from heis, which means "one" (as opposed to other numbers), "single," and "one and the same." As in English, it can be used as a pronoun, meaning a single person.

ἑκάστῳ [unusual](adj sg masc dat) "To every man" is from hekastos, which means "each", "all and each severally," and "each by himself."

κατὰ "According" is from kata, which means "downwards", "down from", "down into", "against", "down toward", "opposite", "separately", "individually", "at a time", "towards", "in accordance with", "concerning", "corresponding with", "during the course of a period," and "severally."

τὴν ἰδίαν (adj sg fem acc ) "His" is from idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual." idios, which means "one's own", "pertaining to oneself", "private", "personal", "personally attached" to one, "separate", "distinct", "strange," and "unusual."

δύναμιν, (noun sg fem acc) "Ability" is from dynamis (dunamis), which means "power", "might", "influence", "authority", "capacity", "elementary force", "force of a word," and "value of money." Elemental forces are forces such as heat and cold.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀπεδήμησεν. [uncommon](verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Traveling into a far country" is from apodemeo, which means "to be far from home", "to be abroad", "to be on one's travels," and "to go abroad." --

The Spoken Version: 

"And, indeed, to this one," he said, indicating to the first of his followers. "He gave five hundred dollars."

He pretended to hand the follower the money and the follower raised it in triumph. As the crowd laughed, he moved to the next follower and said, "To this one, two hundred dollars."

He pretended to hand the money to the second follower. That follower copied the first, raising his imaginary money up and smiling. The teacher moved to the third man.

"And to another a single hundred," he said pretending to hand him the money.

This third follower looked as the amount he had and the amount the others had and made a face. The crowd laughed.

The teacher laughed as well and explained wryly, "To each according to his personal capacity."

The crowd laugh and the master finished, "And he went abroad."

Related Verses: 

Sep 29 2016