Matthew 24:31 And he shall send his angels with a great sound

KJV Verse: 

Mat 24:31 And he shall send his angels with a great sound of a trumpet, and they shall gather together his elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

And he is going to dispatch his messengers within a great comet. And they are going to gather together his chosen out of the four quarters, from an end of the universe until its highest point.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

What is hidden here is the connection of this verse with the previous verses in terms of signs or omens in the sky.

The "he shall send" is from a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle."

"Angels" is from a noun meaning "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use from its use in the NT. The introduction of the idea of "angels," with wings and such, comes other religions. However, the word "messenger" is usually used in Matthew to refer to messengers from God, who Christ says do not have bodies like ours. However, in Mat 11:10, the same word is translated as "messenger" when used to quote scripture referring to those sent by John the Baptist.

"With" is from the Greek word that is almost always translated as "with" or a related concept such as "among" or "in the midst of".

The Greek word for "sound" does not appear in the original text.

The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

"Trumpet" is translated from a Greek word that means "war-trumpet," but it was also the name for a type of comet. Given that the context of the last several verses refers to heavenly bodies and omens, a "great" comet makes more sense than a "great" trumpet, especially since the word "sound" does not appear.

The Greek verb translated as "they shall gather" means "to collect", "to bring in", "to accumulate," and "to count up."

"Elect" is from an adjective that means "picked out", "select", "choice," and "pure." It is used as a noun there, "the ones selected."

The Greek preposition translated as "from" means "out of" or "from." this is a different word than the "from" used below.

The word translated as "winds" means both the physical wind and the direction from which the wind comes. Here, the sense is the four directions.

The word translated as "from" here (different than the one above) means "from" in both location and when referring to a source.

"One end" is from a noun that means "highest or furthest point", "extremity", and "end." The same word is used to mean "the other" later in the verse.

The word translated as "heaven" means sky, the climate, and the universe. It also meant the home of the gods in a physical sense: the sun, moon, and planets were named for the gods. More about the word in this article. When it is used in the plural, as it is here, Christ usually uses it to refer to the realm of God beyond earth rather than the sky.

The word translated as "to" means "until" but it also means "up to the point that."

"The other" is from the noun used above that means "highest or furthest point", "extremity", and "end." Some Greek texts show it as "the furthest point." It is also used with the Greek word usually translated as "their" or "its" referring to the heaven(s) used above.

Greek Vocabulary: 

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀποστελεῖ (verb 3rd sg fut ind act) "He shall send" is from apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

τοὺς ἀγγέλους (noun pl masc/fem acc) "Angels" is from aggelos, which means "messenger" and "envoys" though it became to mean "semi-divine beings" in later use.

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

μετὰ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

σάλπιγγος (noun sg fem gen) "Trumpet" is from salpigx, which means "war-trumpet," but it is also the name of a bird and a kind of comet.

μεγάλης,(adj sg fem gen) "Great" is from megas, which means "big", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "great", "mighty", "strong (of the elements)","loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days).

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐπισυνάξουσιν” "They shall gather together" is from episynago, which means "to collect and bring to a place." It also means to "bring into" a conversation or to "infer" or "conclude."

τοὺς ἐκλεκτοὺς (adj pl masc acc) "Elect" is from eklektos, which means "picked out", "select", "choice," and "pure."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc/neut gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἐκ "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῶν τεσσάρων (noun pl masc gen) "Four" is from tessares, which means "four."

ἀνέμων (noun pl masc gen) "Winds" is from anemos, which means "wind", "a cardinal point," or "quarter." It means both the physical wind and the direction from which the wind comes.

ἀπ᾽ "From" is from apo, a preposition of separation which means "from" or "away from" from when referring to place or motion, "from" or "after" when referring to time, "from" as an origin or cause.

ἄκρων (adj pl masc gen) "One end" is from akron, which means "highest", "furthest point", "outermost", "mountain top", "edge", "peak", "headland", "extremity," and "end."

οὐρανῶν (noun pl masc gen) "Heaven" is from the Greek ouranos, which means "heaven as in the vault of the sky", "heaven as the seat of the gods", "the sky", "the universe," and "the climate."

ἕως "To" is from heos which means "until", "till," and "in order that" and "up to the point that."

[τῶν] ἄκρων (adj pl masc gen) "the other" is from akron, which means "highest", "furthest point", "outermost", "mountain top", "edge", "peak", "headland", "extremity," and "end."

αὺτῶν.” (adj pl masc/fem/neut gen) "His" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

The Spoken Version: 

"And he," he said, pointing at himself. "Is going to send off his messengers."

He pointed to his followers and smiled.

"Within a great comet!" he said enthusiastically.

His followers laughed at the idea.

"And they," he said pointing to them again. "A going to gather together his chosen."

Then he pointed to the four directions and said, "Out of the four quarters,

He paused, then pointed straight up, and said, "From highest heaven..."

Then he circles his finger around the sky and said, "To its edge."

Aug 20 2016