Matthew 25:10 And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came;

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:10 And while they went to buy, the bridegroom came; and they that were ready went in with him to the marriage: and the door was shut.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

But while they were going away to shop [dying to shop], the celebrity came. And the ready went in with him to the marriage celebration. And the door was closed [the entry to soul was celebrated in song].

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse serves as the initial punch line to the story. It is filled with double meanings

The Greek word translated as "and" is usually translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way.

There is not Greek word that is translated as "while," but the "while" comes from the form of the two following words (genitive absolute), a participle ("going away") and a pronoun ("they").

The word translated as "they" here is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but this form is only used to emphasize it because the sense of "they" is already part of the verb.

"Went" is from a Greek verb that means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life." It is in the present tense in the form of an adjective "going way", but the play on words here is the subtle reference to dying like "departing" in English.

The word translated as "to buy" comes from the noun form of the word for "marketplace", which means "to occupy a marketplace", "to buy in the market," and "to occupy a marketplace." It is something like the way we uses "shop" as the verb form of "to shop".

The word translated as "the bridegroom" is a male form of the adjective meaning "bridal," hence, "groom" or, if plural, "the wedding couple." This was the person who plays a central role in a celebration, or, as we would say, "a celebrity." The point is that he is the one who can get the girls into the party.

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out." It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway."

"They that were ready" is from a noun that means "at hand", "ready", "prepared", of persons, "ready", "active", "zealous," of the mind, "ready", "bold," and as an adverb, "readily", "willingly."

"Went in" is from a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

The Greek word translated as "the marriage" is from a verb that means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock." Weddings were the "parties" and "celebrations" of Christ's era. Virtually no other events, not birthdays or anniversaries, were celebrated in the same way.

The word translated as "the door" means "door", and "gate", and, metaphorically, "entrance to the soul."

The word translated as "was shut" is an entertaining bit of wordplay. It is a verb that means "to close" or "to shut in," but, in this form, it is also the a similar form of another verb that means "to make famous" and "to celebrate in song." The word used for "shut" here is used twice previously. In Mat 6:6, Christ tells us to pray to God secretly with the door shut behind us. In Mat 23:13, Christ uses the same term to describe the sin of the scribes and Pharisees: shutting up the kingdom of heaven by requiring too much of regular people.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀπερχομένων (part pl pres mp fem gen) "Went" is from aperchomai, which means "to go away," "to depart from", "to spread abroad," and "to depart from life."

δὲ (conj) "But" is from de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

αὐτῶν (adj pl fem gen ) "While they" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

ἀγοράσαι (verb aor inf act) "Buy" is from agorazo, which means "buy in the market", "buy", "occupy the marketplace", "lounge", or "haunt".

ἦλθεν (verb 3rd sg aor ind act) "Come" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

νυμφίος, (noun sg masc nom) "Bridegroom" is from nymphios, which means "bridal", "bridegroom" and "son-in-law."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

αἱ ἕτοιμοι (adj pl fem nom) "They that were ready" is from hetoimos, which means "at hand", "ready", "prepared", of persons, "ready", "active", "zealous," of the mind, "ready", "bold," and as an adverb, "readily", "willingly."

εἰσῆλθον (verb 3rd pl aor ind act) "Went in" is from eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

μετ᾽ "With" is from meta, which means "with", "in the midst of", "among", "between", "in common", "along with", "by the aid of", "in one's dealings with", "into the middle of", "coming into", "in pursuit of", "after", "behind", "according to," and "next afterward."

αὐτοῦ (adj sg masc gen ) "Him" is from autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

εἰς "To" is from eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τοὺς γάμους, (noun pl masc acc) "The marriage" is from gamos, which means "marriage", "wedding," and "wedlock."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐκλείσθη (verb 3rd sg aor ind pass) "Was shut" can be one of two words. One is kleio, which means "to shut", "to close", "to bar", "to block up", "to shut in", "to confine," and "to shut up." It is a metaphor for causing the heavens to withhold rain. However, this form of the word is also a form of the verb kleo, which means to "tell of", "make famous," and" "celebrate."

θύρα. (noun sg fem nom ) "The door" is from thyra, which means "door", "valve", "gate", "window shutter", "a frame of planks," in war "fence or similar obstruction", "entrance" and, metaphorically, "entrance to the soul."

Wordplay: 

The word translated as "went" also means to "depart from life". With the Greek word meaning "to shop", it forms the idea of "they were dying to shop." 

The word "door" also means the entrance to the soul.

The word "shut" in this form is a homonym for another word meaning "to celebrate in song" and "to make famous." 

The Spoken Version: 

"But," he continued, "while they were dying to shop..."

His followers laughed and he continued, "...Going shopping, the clebrity came."

He played the role of the celebrity coming, waving at his fans.

"And the ready girls went in with him," he continued, waving the followers playing the smart girls to come with him. He then stood aside and signaled them to go in front of him.

After they had passed, he pretended to shut a door and said, "And the entry was shut and celebrated in song."

The followers playing the smart girls congratulated each other.

Sep 24 2016