Matthew 25:35 For I was an hungred, and you gave me meat

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:35 For I was an hungred, and ye gave me meat: I was thirsty, and ye gave me drink: I was a stranger, and ye took me in:

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

This is because I was hungry and you gave me to eat. I was thirsty and you watered me; A refugee, and you gathered me in.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse mixed both very common an uncommon words. Interesting, a couple of these words are found in the Beatitudes.

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation. To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

"I was an hungered" is a verb which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings. This is the same word used in the fourth beatitude, "hunger and thirst for justice."

The verb translated as "you gave" means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe." It is almost always translated as some form of "give." It is only used once here, in the first phrase. The second "you gave" is added.

There is a verb here that is untra="display:none"> ="display:none"> nslated (or translated as the noun "meat") means "to eat" and "to devour". It is a common word for Christ to use.

There is not word for "meat" here.

"I was thirsty" is another common verb which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," and "to thirst after" a thing. Again, it is the same verb used in the fourth beatitude.

The "you gave me to drink" is a verb that means "to give a drink", "to water", "to moisten," and metaphorically "to saturate one's mind". It is not the word the Christ always uses for "give" (as used above) or "to drink" but a word that he rarely uses. This is an indication that he is using it for its special meaning. This is the word used for watering livestock.

"Stranger" is not the common word for "stranger" that has more of the sense of "foreign". It is a more specific noun which means "guest-friend", specifically meaning someone who should receive hospitality, so a "stranger", or "refugee". However, the word also means some that is a "stranger to a thing", "ignorant of a thing", and "unusual".

The Greek word translated as "you took me in" means "to bring together." It has many different uses, but it Christ often uses it as "gather crops", that is, the opposite of scattering, as in, scattering seeds.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἐπείνασα (verb 1st sg aor ind) "I was hungered" is peinaô (peino), which means "to be hungry", "crave after," or "to be starved," and it is a metaphor for desire and cravings.

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

ἐδώκατέ (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "Ye gave" is from didomi, which means "to give", "to grant", "to hand over", "appoint", "establish," and "to describe."

μοι (pron 1st sg masc dat) "Me" is from emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb.

φαγεῖν, (verb aor inf act) "To eat" is from phago) which is a form of the word, phagein, which means to eat", "to eat up," and "to devour."

ἐδίψησα (verb 1st sg aor ind act) "I was thirsty" is from dipsao, which means "to thirst", "to be thirsty," "to be parched", "to be in want of", "to lack," and "to thirst after" a thing.

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." -

ἐποτίσατέ [uncommon](verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "You gave...to drink" is potizo which means "to give a drink", "to water", "to moisten," and metaphorically "to saturate one's mind."

με, (pron 1st sg masc acc ) "Me" is from emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb. \

ξένος [uncommon] (noun sg masc nom ) "Stranger" is from xenos, which means "guest-friend", "stranger", "refugee", "stranger to a thing", "ignorant of a thing", and "unusual".

ἤμην (verb 1st sg imperf ind mid) "Is" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

συνηγάγετέ (verb 1st sg imperf ind mid) "You took me in" is from synago, which means "bring together", "gather together," "pit [two warriors against each other]", "join in one", "unite", "make friends of", "lead with one", "receive", "reconcile", "draw together", "narrow", "contract", "conclude [from premises]", " infer," and "prove."

με, (pron 1st sg masc acc ) "Me" is from emoi, which is 1st person,singular dative pronoun meaning "me' as the indirect object of a verb. -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

The Spoken Version: 

"this is because I was starving," he said rubbing his stomach in hunger, "And you gave me something to eat."

He pause, doing a little pantomime of someone who was hungry enjoying their food.

"I was thirsty," he continued, rubbing his throat, "And you watered me."

He pretended to drink and then poured the water over his head.

"A refugee," he said, making a fearful face, "and you gathered me in."

He opened his arms and made a hugging gesture.

Related Verses: 

Oct 20 2016