Matthew 25:36 Naked, and you clothed me: I was sick,

KJV Verse: 

Mat 25:36 Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Naked and you wrapped around me. I was sickly and you watched over me. I was under guard and you came to see me.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Lots of uncommon words here but only a couple of surprises. And a little wordplay.

The word for "naked" means both "naked" and "destitute." It also means bald and beardless.

The word for "clothed" means "to put on" or "put around." It is a word Christ uses fairly commonly to refer to putting on clothes, starting with Solomon being compared to the lilies of the field.

Surprisingly, the word used for "sick" is also an uncommon one despite all of Christ's work healing, he only uses it once before. It means "to be weak or sickly."

"Visited" is another uncommon word, and it doesn't really mean "visited". The concept is more "look in on" or "watch over" than visiting someone in the hospital.

"Prison" is a word that means a "watcher", "guard", "chain", "keeper," and "a place where people are watched." Christ uses it to clearly mean prison elsewhere, but the play on words is against the positive way of being "watched over".

The word translated as "come" primarily means "to start out" but Christ usually uses it to mean "come" but not always. It indicates movement, especially its beginning, without indicating a direction toward or away from anything, so it works either as "come" or "go," but it is more like our phrase "being underway."

The word translated as "unto" means "towards", "by reason of (for)," and "against." Here, it has the sense of "in the presence of."

Greek Vocabulary: 

γυμνὸς [uncommon](adj sg masc nom) "Naked" is from gymnos, which means "naked", "unclad", "unarmed", "stripped" of a thing, "lightly clad", of facts, "bald", "destitute", and "beardless".

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

περιεβάλετέ (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "You clothed" is from periballo, which means "to throw around", "to put on", "to encompass", "to surround", "to bring under one's power", "amplify", "expand", "appropriate mentally", "comprehend", "to excel", "to surpass", "throw beyond," and "beat in throwing." In the passive, it means "to have put around oneself." "to be involved in," and "to have come into possession of one."

με, (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

ἠσθένησα [uncommon](verb 1st sg aor ind act) "Sick" is from astheneo, which means "to be weak", "to be feeble," and "to be sickly."

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἐπεσκέψασθέ [uncommon] (verb 2nd pl aor ind mp) "Visited is from episkeptomai, from which means to "pass in review", hence, "number" a host. It is a compound word from skeptomai, which means "look about carefully", "spy" ,"to look upon or at", "to observe", "to examine," and "to consider." And a prefix, epi, meaning "Against" is from epi. which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," and "against."

με, (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

ἐν "In" is from en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

φυλακῇ (noun sg fem dat) "Prison" is from phylake, which means "a watching or guarding", "a guard", "a ward", "a watch", " "a station", "a post," "a keeping", "a preserving", "safekeeping", "a safe-guard," and "a precaution."

ἤμην (verb 1st sg imperf ind mid) "Was" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is" or, in the plural, "there are." -- The verb here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition.

καὶ "And" is from eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

ἤλθατε (verb 2nd pl aor ind act) "You came" is from erchomai, which means "to start," "to set out", "to come", "to go," and any kind of motion. It means both "to go" on a journey and "to arrive" at a place.

πρός "Unto" is from pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." -

με. (pron 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is from eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is from the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

The Spoken Version: 

"Naked," he continued, covering himself as if embarrassed, causing titters from the crowd, "and you wrapped around me."

He made a hugging motion.

"I was sickly," he said, holding his hands out shakily and dropping his head down as if passing out, "and you watched over me."

He pantomimed bending over someone checking their temperature.

"I was under guard," he said, holding his hands up as if behind bars. "And you came to me."

I was under guard and you came to see me.

Oct 22 2016