Mark 5:19 Go home to your friends...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Withdraw into that house of yours before those of yours and report to them as much as the Master for you has performed and he has pity for you.

KJV : 

Mark 5:19 Go home to thy friends, and tell them how great things the Lord hath done for thee, and hath had compassion on thee.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is to the man who was cleansed of demons. As discussed in this article, "demons" were the way people talked about mental illness at the time. Note how Jesus instructs the man to tell others about his healing whereas in other cures, for example, Matthew 8:4, he tells people to tell no one. Could this be a difference between physical and mental cures? Also, note that the word "house" is used, not "home." A house was not just the building, but the people of the household as well, which is clearly the point here. The word "friends" is not used. The sense of the Greek is "those of the house."

It is an interesting coincidence that the term use for "home" appears often in stories of demonic possession. It appears in Mat 12:44, where the spirit is out looking for a home. Here, and in Mar 7:30, when Jesus cures a girl of her demons and the mother finds her at home and the demons gone. There is a connection between the spirit as a home for the spirit, and the homes that we live in.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ὕπαγε ( verb 2nd sg pres imperat act ) "I go" is hypago, which means "to lead under", "to bring under", "to bring a person before judgment", "to lead on by degrees", "to take away from beneath", "to withdraw", "to go away", "to retire", "to draw off," and "off with you." --

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)." --

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

οἶκόν (noun sg masc acc) "House" is oikos, which means "house", "dwelling place", "room", "home", "meeting hall", "household goods", "substance," and "ruling family." It is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. --

σου (adj sg masc gen) "Thy" is sou which means "of you" and "your."  -- The word translated as "thy" is the possessive form of the second person pronoun.

πρὸς (prep) "For" is pros, which means "on the side of", "in the direction of", "from (place)", "towards" "before", "in the presence of", "in the eyes of", "in the name of", "by reason of", "before (supplication)", "proceeding from (for effects)", "dependent on", "derivable from", "agreeable,""becoming", "like", "at the point of", "in addition to", "against," and "before." --

τοὺς (article pl masc acc) "Friends" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

σούς ( adj pl masc acc ) "Thy" is sos, which means "thy", "thine" "of thee," or "from thee."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἀπάγγειλον ( verb 2nd sg aor imperat act ) "Tell" is anaggello, which means to "carry back tidings", "to report", "tell," and "proclaim." From the root word for "angels" meaning "messengers."

αὐτοῖς (adj pl masc dat) "Them" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." --

ὅσα ( adj pl neut acc/nom ) "Great" is hosos, which means "as many", "as much as", "as great as", "as far as," and "only so far as." --

(article sg masc nom) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

κύριός (noun sg masc nom) "Lord" is kyrios (kurios), which means "having power", "being in authority" and "being in possession of." It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." --

σοι (pron 2nd sg dat) "You" is soi which is the singular, second person pronoun, "you". -- The word for "you" is the indirect object form of the pronoun. 

πεποίηκεν ( verb 3rd sg perf ind act ) "Has done" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to perform", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do." --

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." --

ἠλέησέν  ( verb 3rd sg aor ind act ) "Hath had compassion" is the verb eleeo, which means "to have pity on," "to show pity to," and "to feel pity." In the passive, "to be shown pity," and "to be pitied."

σε. (pron 2nd sg acc) "Thee" is from se, the second person singular accusative pronoun. -- 

KJV Analysis: 

Go "Go" is a Greek verbal command that means literally "go under" or "bring under," but Christ usually uses it to mean "go away" and "depart."

untranslated The Greek word that means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

untranslated The Greek definite article, "the," which usually precedes a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

home The Greek word translated as "house," is any dwelling place but not exclusively a separate house. It means the household or clan that lives in the building as well.

to The word translated as "to" means "towards", "before," "by reason of (for)," and "against."

thy The word translated as "thy" is adjective form of the second person possessive pronoun.

friends, There is no Greek word for "friends" here.

untranslated The word used instead of "friends" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  This is a good example of its use as "those."  Here, the sense is "those of your household."

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

tell "Tell" is not any of the common forms of "say" or "speak." It is a verb used only here in the synoptic Gospels by Jesus, but one he uses many times in John. It means to "carry back tidings", "to report", "tell," and "proclaim." From the root word for "angels" meaning "messengers."

them The word translated as "them" is the Greek word commonly translated as third-person pronouns in English. 

how great things The Greek words for "how," "great," and "things" are not used here. This is from an adjective of comparison that means "as great as", ""as much as," and similar ideas of comparison.

the The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.

Lord The word translated as "master" is the same word that is often translated as "Lord" or "the Lord" in the NT. It also means "lord", "master of the house," and "head of the family." It is the specific terms for the master of slaves or servants, but it was a common term of respect both for those in authority and who were honored. It was the term people used to address Christ, even though he had no formal authority. Today, we would say "boss" or "chief".

hath This is used to create the tense of the following verb.

done The Greek word translated as "done" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

for This come from the form of the following pronoun, which requires a preposition to express in English.

thee, The "thee" here is singular second-person pronoun. The form of this word requires that addition of a preposition in English to capture its meaning, a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, and an "in" for area of affect.

and The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, it is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

hath had compassion on thee.

Front Page Date: 

Jul 14 2019