Mark 7:18 Are you so without understanding also?

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

In this way also you yourselves, witless are. No, you don't think. Because everything that from without entering into the man doesn't have the power him to share.

KJV : 

Mark 7:18 Are you so without understanding also? Do you not perceive, that whatsoever thing from without enters into the man, [it] cannot defile him;

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

When Jesus nearly repeats his words (this is very like Mar 7:15) especially to explain himself, he often extends an idea. Here, Jesus is clearly making fun of those with whom he is talking, but he also adds the idea that a lack of wisdom in not thinking about what makes sense.  It is obvious that what goes into a person cannot be shared. The word translated as "defile" means "communicate" and "share." However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something does "defile" something dedicate to the Divine.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Οὕτως (adv) "So" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer." As an adverb, it means "in this way", "therefore", "so much", "to such an extent," and "that is why."

καὶ (conj/adv) "Also" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὑμεῖς (pron 2nd pl nom) "Ye" is hymeis (humeis), which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

ἀσύνετοί [uncommon]( adj pl masc nom ) "Without understanding" is from the Greek, asynetos which means "stupid" and "witless," literally "not" sunetos, that is, "intelligence" or "wise."

ἐστε; ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

νοεῖτε ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Perceive" is from noeo, means specifically to "perceive with the eyes," "observe," "perceive by the mind," "apprehend,""think," "consider," "reflect," " think out," "devise," "conceive," " purpose," and "intend."

ὅτι (adv/conj) "That" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

πᾶν ( adj sg neut nom ) "Whatsoever " is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τὸ (article sg neut nom) "Thing" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἔξωθεν (adv) "From without"is exothen, which "from without" and "outward."

εἰσπορευόμενον (part sg pres mp neut nom) "Entereth" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἄνθρωπον (noun sg masc acc) "Man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

οὐ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

δύναται ( verb 3rd sg pres ind mp ) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

αὐτὸν  (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

κοινῶσαι, [uncommon](verb aor inf act) "Defile" is from koinoo, which means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share," and "to make common."  Only in the Gospels is it translated as "defile" from the idea that to make something "common" is to defile it.

KJV Analysis: 

Are -- The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.  This word doesn't begin the verse, but is the last word in the clause.

ye -- The pronoun "ye" is used explicitly as the subject of the sentence. Since it is already part of the verb, its use here creates emphasis on the "you" as we might say "you yourselves." It is plural.

so -- The word translated in KJV as "thus" is in its adverbial form, so it means "in this manner" or "in this way."

without understanding "Without understanding" is a Greek adjective that means "stupid" and "witless," literally "not intelligent" or "not wise."

also? -- The Greek word translated as "also" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

Do The Greek verb below could be a question of a simple statement. This is added in English to make it into a question.

ye This is from the form of the verb, second person plural.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

perceive, "Perceive" is a verb that means specifically to "perceive with the eyes," "perceive by the mind," "apprehend,""think," "consider," "reflect," " think out," "devise," "conceive," " purpose," and "intend."

that -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.  "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

whatsoever -- The word translated as "whatsoever" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything."

thing -- The word translated as "thing" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

from without -- The word used for "from without" is the adverb meaning "outwardly" and "from without." '

entereth -- "Entereth" is a verb that means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines the prefix meaning into with the root word that means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

into  -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man, -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

it  There is no "it" in the Greek.

can- - The word translated as "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. Often, in English, "can" is a helper verb, indicating a possibility. In Greek, it indicates having an ability or power.

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

defile -- "Defile" is a verb that means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share." Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile." The difference between "defile" and "communicate" is not a trivial one. However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something does "defile" something dedicate to the Divine.

him; -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 7 2019