Mark 7:19 Because it enters not into his heart...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Because no, it doesn't going by itself just there into the heart but into the gut and into the toilet in goes out by itself, cleansing all things eaten.

KJV : 

Mark 7:19 Because it entereth not into his heart, but into the belly, and goeth out into the draught, purging all meats?

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Most of this verse is bracketed by the words meaning "going into" and "going out of" which are different forms of the same verb. Both verb describe something that happens by itself. The word translated as "his" means "just there" because it is used as an adverb, not a possessive pronoun, but it also has the sense of something happening automatically because the word is "autos." The sense is that there is not choice of decision involved.

The word translated as "draught" is translated as "sewer" in some modern Bibles or replaced with the verb "eliminated." It is a rare word but the sense is more "toilet" since it means literally "out of sitting."

The word translated as "meats" means "things eaten." It is from a root word that means "to eat."

Wordplay: 

A contrast of the word meaning "going in" and "going out."

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

First, this verse refers to the Greek concepts of "belly" and "heart," which are both physical and metaphorical.  The heart or the chest is the home of the higher emotions and impulses, while the belly is the home of the lower emotions and impulses. Jesus uses this contrast a number of other places such as Mat 12:40.  Symbolically, the belly is the physical body while the heart is the emotional relationship. These ideas run constantly through Christ teaching. Unlike later Christians, Jesus attaches no guilt or shame with the physical body, but he makes it clear that humans are much more than their physical nature. Here, the emphasis is on how the physical body cleans itself of its impurities.  Consider this a contradiction of the idea that we are what we eat. Another subtle idea here is that everything that is purely physical becomes foul. This is consistent with Jesus's overarching theme that physical life is temporary.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ὅτι (adv/conj) "Because" is hoti, which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

οὐκ (partic) "Not" is ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

εἰσπορεύεται ( verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Entereth" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

αὐτοῦ (adv, adj sg masc gen) "His" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc ) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

καρδίαν ( noun sg fem acc ) "Heart" is kardia, which means "heart (the physical organ)", "the seat of emotions (especially passion, rage, and anger)", "inclination", "desire," "purpose", "mind", "the pith (in wood), and "the deep (of the sea)."

ἀλλ᾽ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὴν (article sg fem acc ) Untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

κοιλίαν, ( noun sg fem acc ) "Belly" is from the Greek, koilia, which means the "cavity within the body" (from the Greek, koilos, for "hollow"). It means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

τὸν (article sg masc acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἀφεδρῶνα [uncommon]( noun sg masc acc ) "Draught" is aphedron, which means "privy" or "toilet." It is a word that only three times in ancient Greek, here, in the parallel verse in Matthew and in a religious text work by  Clement of Alexandria, writing ain  appears in the NT here to describe a place for dumping human waste. It means literally "separate from sitting." A similar word was used in the Greek translation of Lev 12:5 to describe the separation of a woman bleeding after childbirth. The source seems to be a vulgar Macedonian word.

ἐκπορεύεται; ( verb 3rd sg pres ind mp)  "Goes out" is from ekporeuomai, which means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out."

καθαρίζων ( part sg pres act masc nom ) "Purging" is katharizo, which means "to clean", "to clear the ground of weeds,""prune away", "to remove dirt", "to purify,"and "to remove impurities." It is also used to describe the removal of the inedible parts from grain (winnowing), clearing weeds from a field, pruning a plant and so on.--

πάντα ( adj pl neut acc ) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether."

τὰ (article pl neut acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

βρώματα[uncommon]( noun pl neut acc )"Meats" is from broma, which means "that which is eaten", "food," and "meat."

KJV Analysis: 

Because -- The word translated as "that" introduces a statement of fact or cause.

it This is from the singular form of the following verb.

entereth --  "Entereth" is a verb that means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines  a prefix meaning "in" with  a root verb that means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed." The form of this word indicates that it does this by itself,

not -- The Greek word translated as "not" is the Greek negative used to deny objective facts, not opinions. It makes a negative statement of fact. Adding "really" to the sentence to captures the same idea.

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

his -- The word translated as "his" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it can also be an advcrb. Here, it is not associate with the noun "heart" directly, coming  before the preposition "into."  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

untranslated -- The untranslated word here is "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

heart, -- "Heart" is the Greek word that means "heart" both the physical organ and as the seat of emotions, which we discuss in a larger Greek context in this article here. However, this phrase can be read as defining the "heart" and both the "soul" and "the mind".

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The untranslated word here is "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

belly, "Belly" is from the Greek noun that means the "cavity within the body" from a word meaning "hollow". It means both the belly, the intestines, and the womb. The word is also used to mean "excrement," which fills the hollow.

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also")

goeth out  "Goes out" is a verb that means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out." It is the same root was the word above translaterd as "entereth" but with a prefix meaing "out from" instead of "into." The form of this word indicates that it does this by itself,

into -- The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

the -- The untranslated word here is "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

draught, "Draught" is aphedron, which is a word that only appears in the NT here to describe a place for dumping human waste. It means literally "separate from sitting." A similar word was used in the Greek translation of Lev 12:5 to describe the separation of a woman bleeding after childbirth. The source seems to be a vulgar Macedonian word.

purging The Greek word translated as "be clean," means to remove dirt. It is used for a lot of specific types of "cleaning" including cleansing a person of leprosy but it also has a general meaning of "purifying" anything.

all -- The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." As an adverb, it means "in every way", "on every side," and "altogether."

meats? -- "Meats" is another uncommon word for Jesus, but a common work in ancient Greek. It means "meat," "food," or literally, "things eaten." It is plural.

Front Page Date: 

Aug 8 2019