Mark 7:9 Full well you reject the commandment of God,

KJV Verse: 

Mark 7:9 Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Thoroughly, do you cancel the order of the Divine so that you may guard that transmission of orders for yourselves.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This is a restatement of the previous verse, Mark 7:8 , but Jesus doesn't do so frivolously. He does it because it is easy to miss his meaning. As we saw in the previous verse, the word translated as "tradition" means "what is handed down" but it also means  "the transmission of orders." A tradition is something handed down through history. A command of God is more like natural law, but the communication of the law is tradition. However, here he adds an idea to that statement. The word translated as "your own" is not a possessive, but has the meaning of "for yourselves."  What religious leaders are protecting is their ability to acts as the middlemen between God and their followers. Jesus saw these middlemen as making God's message ineffective because what they emphasize is their power as priests rather than God's will.

KJV Analysis: 

Full well   -- The word translated as "full well" means, as an adverb, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly". It is also the adjective usually translated as "good."    See this article on the real Greek meaning of the terms translated as "good" and "evil." 

ye -- This comes from the second-person plural form of the following verb.

reject -- "Ye reject" is a Greek verb that means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to :break faith with."

the The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

commandment -- The word translated as "commandment" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society.

of -- The word translated as "of" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and signals its form. The form of this word requires that addition of extra words in English to capture its meaning.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God, -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

that -- The word translated as "that" is not the simple demonstrative pronoun, but a word that means "there", "where," and "in order that."

ye -- This comes from the second-person plural form of the following verb.

may -- This comes from the form of the verb that indicates possibility.

keep -- The term "keep" means "to watch over", "to guard", "to take care of", "to give heed to", "to keep," and "to observe." Christ usually uses it to describe what people should do with teaching or laws.

your own -- The Greek pronoun "you" here is plural and in the form of an indirect object, "to you", "for you", etc.  If is not the genitive form that Jesus consistently uses to indicate possession so likely he means somethng else here.  The form of this word requires that addition of a preposition in English to capture its meaning, a "to" as an indirect object, a "with" for instruments, an "in" for locations, an "as" for purposes, an "of" for possession, a "by" for agents, an "as" for comparisons, and an "in" for area of affect.

tradition. -- "Tradition" is from a noun which means literally "handing over" and it used to mean "handing over" and "passing down." It is used to mean the "transmission" of legends, "bequeathing" of an inheritance," or that which is handed down such as "tradition", "doctrine," or "teaching."

 

Greek Vocabulary: 

Καλῶς (adv, adj pl masc acc) "Full well" is kalos, which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base." As an adverb, "well", "rightly",  "happily",  "thoroughly", "altogether", and "deservedly". 

ἀθετεῖτε  [uncommon]( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Ye reject" is atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to :break faith with."

τὴν (article sg fem acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

ἐντολὴν ( noun sg fem acc ) "Commandments\" is entole which means "injunction", "order," and "command."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "Of" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." --

θεοῦ, (noun sg masc gen) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

ἵνα (adv/conj) "That" is hina, which means "in that place", "there", "where", "when", "that", "in order that", "when," and "because."

τὴν ( article sg fem acc) untranslated is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

παράδοσιν [uncommon]( noun sg fem acc )  "Tradition" is from paradosis, which means "handing down", "transmission", "that which is handed down," and "the transmission of orders." This specifically includes legends, traditions, and doctrines but it is not specific about the quality of what is handed down, only that it has been passed down.

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl dat) "Your own" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

τηρήσητε: ( verb 2nd pl aor subj act or  verb 2nd pl fut ind act) "Ye may keep" is tereo, which means "to watch over", "to guard", "to take care of", "to give heed to", "to keep," and "to observe."

Related Verses: 

Jul 30 2019