Mark 7:13 Making the word of God of none effect...

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Canceling this idea of the Divine with that transmission of orders of yours that you hand down and  nearly equal such myriads you are making.

KJV : 

Mark 7:13 Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The word beginning this verse is translated as "cancel" and it is only used by Jesus here and in a related verse in Matthew. Whenever Jesus uses the Greek word "traditions," what is lost is the connection between that word and power. In Greek, the word also means "the transmission of orders," so the sense is that Pharisees made themselves the middlemen in the exchange. We see this same idea repeated earlier in Mark 7:8 and Mark 7:9. The last part of this verse is confusing, but the gist is that the Pharisees are not only promoting traditions but making a myriad of new rules that are nearly equal to traditions. 

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

Jesus often repeats statements to emphasize the three overlapping realms--physical, mental, and emotional--in which we live. In this case, he touches on all three: "words" are the mental realm, but transmission of orders is the emotional (social) realm, and "doing" is the physical realm. The general sense here is that people torture logic, that is, God's logos, to justify what they want in terms of social power and physical gratification.

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀκυροῦντες [uncommon]( part pl pres act masc nom) "Making...of none effect" is from akyroo, which means "to cancel", "to set aside," and "render powerless."

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

λόγον (noun sg masc acc) "Word" is logos, which means "word", "computation", "relation", "explanation", "law", "rule of conduct", "continuous statement", "tradition", "discussion," "reckoning," and "value."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen)) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

τῇ ( article sg fem dat) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

παραδόσει ( noun sg fem dat) "Tradition" is from paradosis (paradosis), which means "handing down", "transmission", "that which is handed down," and "the transmission of orders." This specifically includes legends, traditions, and doctrines but it is not specific about the quality of what is handed down, only that it has been passed down

ὑμῶν (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

( pron sg fem dat ) "Which" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

παρεδώκατε: ( verb 2nd pl aor ind act ) "You have delivered" is paradidomi, which means "to give over to another", "to transmit", "to hand down", "to grant", "to teach," and "to bestow."

καὶ (conj/adv) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

παρόμοια [unique]( adj pl neut nom/acc) "Like things" is paromoios, which means "closely resembling," and "nearly equal."

τοιαῦτα ( adj pl neut acc/nom) "Such" is toioutos, which means "such as this", "so great a thing", ""such a condition", "such a reason", "and suchlike."

πολλὰ ( adj pl neut acc/nom) "Many" is polus, which means "many (in number)", "great (in size or power or worth)," and "large (of space)." As an adverb, it means "far", "very much", "a great way," and "long."

ποιεῖτε. ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act) "Do ye" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to perform", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

KJV Analysis: 

Making...of none effect through "Making...of none effect" is a Greek verb used only here and in a relatever vers of Matthew 15:6. It means "to cancel", "to set aside," and "render powerless."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.  Here, the "this" clearly refers to the commandment "honor thy father.:"

word -- "Word" is translated from a Greek word that means "calculation," or "reasoning." It is the source of our word "logic" and is the root word for all the English words that end in "-ology." Most biblical translations translated it as "word" for somewhat poetic reasons. More about this word in this article. In English, we would say "idea" to describe it. 

of This comes from the form of the following article and noun.

untranslated -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article.

God -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

your -- The word translated as "your" is plural addressing a group of Jesus's listeners. It comes after the noun so "of yours."

tradition, -- "Tradition" is from a noun which means literally "handing over" and it used to mean "handing over" and "passing down." It is used to mean the "transmission" of legends, "bequeathing" of an inheritance," or that which is handed down such as "tradition", "doctrine," or "teaching."

which -- The word translated as "which" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

ye This comes from the form fo the following verb, second person, plural.

have This word is misleading. It indicates the following verb is the past, the past perfect specifically, however, it isn't. The verb is a form that indicates something happening at a specific point in time, past, present or future.

delivered: -- "Delivered" is a compound word which literally means "to give over." It is often translated in the KJV as "betray" but it has no real sense of that. Here, the sense is "handed down."

and -- The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also"). In a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." After words implying sameness "as".

many -- The word translated as "many" means many in number, great in power or worth, and large in size. However, since this word comes at the end of a series of adjective, the sense is more of a noun, myriads.

such  "Such" is an adjective that means "such as this", "so great a thing", ""such a condition", "such a reason", "and suchlike."

like "Like things" is an adjective that is only used by Jesus here, It means "closely resembling," and "nearly equal." This word comes first in the series of adjective, not less.

things This word doesn't occur in Greek. It is added because three adjectives appear in a row without a noun. In Greek, the last such adjective would act like a noun.

do -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

ye. This comes from the form of the verb.

Front Page Date: 

Aug 3 2019