Mark 7:12 And you suffer him no more to do ought

KJV Verse: 

Mark 7:12 And you suffer him no more to do ought for his father or his mother;

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

No more. You let him go: nothing to perform for that father or that mother.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This verse uses two related words translated as "no more" and "ought." The first is the adverbial form of the later, more like the English "no more" and "no-thing." This is another good example of how spoken statements are sometimes difficult to render into proper written sentences. See this article on spoken versus written language.  The verse puts a light-hearted, sarcastic comment at the end, which is typical of Jesus's humor. The ending of the last verse had a similar light-hearted note.

KJV Analysis: 

And There is no "and" in the Greek.

you This is from the form of the following verb, second-person plural so "you all."

suffer -- The word translated as "suffer" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English. 

no more -- "No more" is an adverb that means "no more", "no longer", "no further" and generally, "not now." This word begins the sentence.

to do -- The Greek word translated as "to do" has the primary meaning of "making" or producing" something or "causing" or "performing" as service. It describes a productive action.  It is not as broad a word as the English "do", which covers all actions, productive or not. 

ought -- The Greek word translated as "ought" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns. However, to avoid the English double-negative, we translate it as its opposite "anyone" when used with another Greek negative.

for --  This is from the form of the following article and verb.

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which often precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

his There is no :"his" in the Greek. The sense of the line is "that father" not "his father."

father -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

or -- "Than" is translated from a Greek word that means primary "or" but serves as "than" in a comparison. The same word could also be the exclamation "hi" or the adverb meaning "in truth."

untranslated -- The untranslated word is the Greek definite article, which often precedes a noun.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

his There is no :"his" in the Greek. The sense of the line is "that father" not "his father."

mother; -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

Greek Vocabulary: 

οὐκέτι (adv) "No more" is ouketi, which means "no more", "no longer", "no further" and generally, "not now." 

ἀφίετε ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "You suffer" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

οὐδὲν ( adj sg neut acc ) "Ought" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ποιῆσαι ( verb aor inf act ) "To do" is poieo, which means "to make", "to produce", "to create", "to bring into existence", "to bring about", "to cause", "to perform", "to render", "to consider", "to prepare", "to make ready," and "to do."

τῷ (article sg masc dat ) "For" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

πατρὶ ( noun sg masc dat ) "Father" is pater, which means "father", "grandfather", "author", "parent," and "forefathers." -- "Father" is the Greek noun that means "father" or any male ancestor so "forefathers". It is the word that Christ uses to address his own Father. 

(conj/adv)  "Or" is e which is a particle meaning "either", "or," or "than." OR (exclam) "Or" is e which is an exclamation meaning "hi!" OR (adv) "Or" is e, which is an adverb meaning "in truth" and "of a surety".

τῇ (article sg femdat ) "his" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

μητρί, ( noun sg femdat ) "Mother" is meter, which means "mother", "grandmother", "mother hen", "source," and "origin." -- "Mother" is the common Greek word for "mother" and "grandmothers," but it also means "the source" of something.

Related Verses: 

Aug 2 2019