Mark 7:8 For laying aside the commandment of God,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Letting go the command of the Divine, you control that which is handed down of men.

KJV : 

Mark 7:8 For laying aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washing of pots and cups: and many other such like things ye do.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

Most of this verse does exist in the Greek sources that we use today. See this article about Greek source and translation.  The word translated as "tradition" means "what is handed down" but it also means  "the transmission of orders." A tradition is something handed down through history. A command of God is more like natural law, but the communication of the law is tradition. The theme of many of Jesus's encounters with religious leaders is that they enforced a number of traditions in order to maintain their power over people, especially their power to criticize others.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀφέντες ( part pl aor act masc nom ) "Laying aside" is aphiemi, which means "to let fall", "to send away", "give up", "hand over", "to let loose", "to get rid of", "to leave alone", "to pass by", "to permit," and "to send forth from oneself." -- The word translated as "forgive" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament.

τὴν ( article sg fem acc ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐντολὴν (noun sg fem acc) "Commandment" is entole which means "injunction", "order," and "command."

τοῦ ( article sg masc gen  ) "Of" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

θεοῦ (noun sg masc gen  ) "God" is theos, which means "God," the Deity."

κρατεῖτε ( verb 2nd pl pres ind act ) "Ye hold" is from krateo, which means "to rule", "to hold sway", "to be the lord and master", "to conquer", "to prevail over", "to get the upper hand", "to seize", "to control," and "to command."

τὴν ( article sg fem acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

παράδοσιν [uncommon]( noun sg fem acc )  "Tradition" is from paradosis, which means "handing down", "transmission", "that which is handed down," and "the transmission of orders." This specifically includes legends, traditions, and doctrines but it is not specific about the quality of what is handed down, only that it has been passed down.

τῶν ( article pl masc gen) "Of" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀνθρώπων. (noun pl masc gen) "Men" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

The rest of this verse doesn't exist in the Greek sources that we use today. The more modern Bible do not have it. See this article about Greek sources.

KJV Analysis: 

For There is no Greek word that means "for" in the Greek source we use today.

laying aside -- The word translated as "laying aside" primarily means "to let go" or "to send away." This same word is usually translated as "leave", "forgive", "suffer," and "let" in the New Testament. This is the word used to mean "forgive" in phrases like "the forgiveness of sin." See this article for more.

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

commandment -- The word translated as "commandments" has the sense of a direct "order" or "command" given by someone as opposed to a body of law or tradition in society.

of -- The word translated as "of" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and provides information about its form before it does. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

God, -- The word translated as "God" means "God" and "deity." It is introduced with an article, so "the God." Jesus often uses it this way perhaps to indicate the one God as opposed to the pagan gods.

ye This comes from the form of the ending of the following verb, making it second-person plural.

hold -- The Greek verb translated as "ye hold" means "to rule", "to conquer", "to seize", "to control," and "to command." This is the term used

the The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun. The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

tradition -- "Tradition" is from a noun which means literally "handing over" and it used to mean "handing over" and "passing down." It is used to mean the "transmission" of legends, "bequeathing" of an inheritance," or that which is handed down such as "tradition", "doctrine," or "teaching."

of -- The word translated as "of" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun providing information about its form. In English, that form requires a preposition.  The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

men, -- The Greek word for "men" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

This rest of this verse does not exist in the Greek sources we use today. It seems more of an explanation of those traditions provided by the St. Jerome than something Jesus actually said. See this article about Greek sources and translation.

Front Page Date: 

Jul 29 2019