Mark 7:20 That which comes out of the man,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

The stuff out of the man coming? That stuff there communicates/makes common the mans.

KJV : 

Mark 7:20 That which cometh out of the man, that defileth the man.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

This line seems a repetition of the idea at the end of an earlier verse (Mark 7:15), but it is really a punchline. The way that this is said is a play on words, equating the words coming out of a person with human waste. It is a reference to the word "toilet" in the last verse. In other words, Jesus is calling "bullsh-t" on his critics. The concept of being "defiled"in Greek means "communicate" or "share" but it also mean "make common," which the

Wordplay: 

The "stuff coming out of the man" can be either words or human waste.

Related Verses: 

Possible Symbolic Meaning: 

While this series of verses, that is, this lesson, starts with a discussion of the violation of the Jewish laws regarding washing, Jesus turns the discussion into one about judgment, specially how we can judge people. The religious leaders want to judge people by how well others conformed to their interpretation of religious law, but Jesus points out that we cannot judge people by what they put into their bodies or even what comes out of our bodies, because as physical bodies, we all are full of crud. We have to judge people by what comes out of our humanity, which is a different level of existence. We are not our bodies. Because we have a mental, emotional, and spiritual life, we transcend the merely physical.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Τὸ ( article sg neut nom ) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἐκ (prep) "Out of" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "Of man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

ἐκπορευόμενον  (part pl pres mp neut nom) "Cometh" is from ekporeuomai, which means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out."  --

ἐκεῖνο (adj sg neut nom) "That" is ekeinos (kakeinos), which means "the person there", "that person", "that thing", "in that case", "in that way", "at that place," and "in that manner."

κοινοῖ ( verb 3rd sg pres ind act ) "Defileth" is koinoo, which means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share," and "to make common."  Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile" from the idea that to make something "common" is to defile it. In the original Latin translation of the NT, this word is translated as communicare, which is the source of our word "communicate."

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἄνθρωπον: (noun sg masc acc) "Of man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

KJV Analysis: 

That -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." Or, in this case, because it is neutral, "the stuff." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

which This word does not exist in the Greek. It is added because the form of the following verb is changed, making it active.

cometh out "Come" is a verb that means literally, "to make to go or carry out of" and is translated regularly as "to make to go out of", "to fetch out," and "to march out." It is in the form of an adjective not an active verb,  "the stuff coming out."

of -- The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man, -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

that -- The word translated as "that" is an adjective that highlights its noun as in a specific place from a word that means "there." In this case, it is neutral, so "that stuff there." This is not the pronoun used as a connective "that."

defileth -- "Defileth" is a verb that means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share." Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile." However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something, "making it common," does "defile" something that should be dedicated to the Divine. The Latin word translated this verse in the Latin Vulgate also means "communicate. Only in the English translation, does it become "defiled"

the -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun.The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

man. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

Front Page Date: 

Aug 9 2019