Mark 7:15 There is nothing from without a man,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

Nothing there is from outside of the man carrying in into him that has the power to reveal him, but whatever out from the man coming out is something revealing the man.

KJV : 

Mark 7:15 There is nothing from without a man, that entering into him can defile him: but the things which come out of him, those are they that defile the man.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

There is a lot more symatry to the Greek than the KJV translation. Jesus seems to be referring to a specific person here, not a generic person because he uses the definite article meaning "the" or "this" to refer to the person. This construction also refers to an exceptional person. The Greek verbs translated as "entering" and "come out" are the same root word with different prefixes, and both are somewhat redundant because both the prefix and the preposition with the same meaning are used.  The Greek word that is translated here as "defiled" here is only translated that way in NT English. The normal translation of the word is to communicate, share, and impart. The idea is that the things coming out of a person communicates or shares what he is. In English, we might say that it "reveals" him, showing us what he really is. The difference between "defile" and "communicate" is not a trivial one. However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something does "defile" something dedicate to the Divine.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

οὐδὲν  ( adj sg neut nom/acc ) "Nothing" is oudeis which means "no one", "not one", "nothing", "naught", "good for naught," and "no matter."

ἔστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Is" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.") -- The verb "is" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

ἔξωθεν (adv) "From without" is from exothen, which "from without" and "outward."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "A man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate.

εἰσπορευόμενον  ( part sg pres mp masc acc ) "Entering" is eisporeuomai, which means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines "eis," which means "in" with poreuô (poreuomai), which means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

αὐτὸν (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

(pro sg masc nom ) "That" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings.

δύναται ( verb 3rd sg pres ind mp ) "Can" is the verb, dynamai, which means "to have power by virtue of your own capabilities", "to be able," and "to be strong enough."

κοινῶσαι ( verb aor inf act) "Defile" is from koinoo, which means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share," and "to make common."  Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile" from the idea that to make something "common" is to defile it.

αὐτόν: (adj sg masc acc) "Him" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord." In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there."

ἀλλὰ (adv) "But" is alla, which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay."

τὰ ( irreg pl neut nom ) "The things which" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

ἐκ (prep) "From" is ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τοῦ (article sg masc gen) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones."

ἀνθρώπου (noun sg masc gen) "A man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

ἐκπορευόμενά (part pl pres mp neut nom) "Come" is from ekporeuomai, which means "to make to go out", "to fetch out," and "to march out."  --

ἐστιν  (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," of circumstance and events "to happen",  and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

τὰ ( irreg pl neut nom ) "those" is tis which can mean "someone", "any one", "everyone", "they [indefinite]", "many a one", "whoever", "anyone", "anything", "some sort", "some sort of", "each", "any", "the individual", "such," and so on. In a question, it can mean "who", "why," or "what."

κοινοῦντα ( part pl pres act neut nom ) "Defile" is from koinoo, which means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share," and "to make common."  Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile" from the idea that to make something "common" is to defile it.

τὸν (article sg masc acc) "The" is the Greek definite article, hos, ("the"), which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." -- The word translated as "the" is the Greek definite article, which usually precedes a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

ἄνθρωπον. (noun sg masc gen) "A man" is anthropos, which is "man," and, in plural, "mankind." It also means "humanity" and that which is human and opposed to that which is animal or inanimate. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples".

KJV Analysis: 

There is  -- When the verb "to be" appears early in the sentence before the subject, the sense is more like "it is," "there is," or, in the plural, "there are." 

nothing -- The Greek word translated as "nothing" also means "no one" and other negatives nouns.

from without "From without" is an adverb that means "from without" and "outward."

a -- The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the,." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. -- The form of this word and the following usually requires the addition of extra words in English to capture its meaning.  The most common is the "of" of possession, but it can also mean "belonging to," "part of", "which is", "than" (in comparisons), or  "for", "concerning" or "about" with transitive nouns. 

man, -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples". 

that -- There is no Greek "that" at this point in the text.

entering -- "Entering into" is a Greek verb that means "lead in", "go into," and "enter." It combines  a prefix that means "in" with a root verb that means "make to go", "carry", "convey", "bring", "go", "march," and "proceed."  The same root is used for the word later in the verse with a prefix meaning the opposite.

into -- The word translated as "unto" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, "in regards to" a subject, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

him -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

untranslated -- The  untranslated word  is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

can -- The word translated as "can" means having the power or possibly a desire to accomplish something. It  indicates having an ability or power.

defile -- "Defile" is a verb that means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share." Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile." The difference between "defile" and "communicate" is not a trivial one. However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something does "defile" something dedicate to the Divine.

him: -- The word translated as "him" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English.  The word means "the same" when used as an adjective. In the adverbial form, it  means "just here" or "exactly there." 

but -- The Greek word translated as "but" denotes an exception or simple opposition. It is used to emphasize the contrast between things like we use "rather". It is the Greek word "other" like we use "otherwise".

the things which -- The Greek word translated as "the things which"  means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those."  Jesus often uses it to start a question so it means "who", "what", or even "why". 

come "Come" is a verb that means literally, "to make to go or carry out of" and is translated regularly as "to make to go out of", "to fetch out," and "to march out," but in modern English, we would probably say "exit" here. It is in the form of an adjective used as a noun, where the subject affects itself "the things bringing themselves "

out of -- The Greek preposition translated as "of" means "out of" or "from." In Greek, they use the genitive case instead of a preposition for the types of phrases with usually use with "of."

him, There is no pronoun here, but the phrase, "the man."

untranslated -- The untranslated  word is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

untranslated -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples".

those -- The Greek word translated as "those" in the singular means "anyone", "someone," and "anything." In the plural, it means "some", "they," and "those." 

are -- The verb "are" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It also equates terms or assigns characteristics.

they that These words do not exist in the Greek.

defile -- "Defile" is a verb that means "to communicate", "to impart", "to share." Only in Matthew and Mark is it translated as "defile." The difference between "defile" and "communicate" is not a trivial one. However, the Judaic idea of "holiness" is connected with having something "set apart" for the Divine, while what is shared among people is consider "common" instead of holy. So sharing something does "defile" something dedicate to the Divine.

the -- The word translated as "a" is the Greek definite article, "the." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more.

man. -- The Greek word for "man" means "man", "person" and "humanity" in the singular. In the plural, it means "men", "people", and "peoples".

Front Page Date: 

Aug 5 2019