Luke 10:10 But into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not,

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:10 But into whatsoever city ye enter, and they receive you not, go your ways out into the streets of the same, and say,

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

Into that, however, possibly a city, you enter and they don't want to welcome you, going out into those broadways of it, speak!  

Hidden Meaning: 

The Greek word translated as "but" joins phrases in an adversarial way. Since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. 

The word translated as "into" means "into" a place, "towards" as a direction, and "up to" limits in time and measure.

The word translated as "whosoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

Untranslated is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

The Greek word for "city" meant not only a city but a nation, culture, or a society. It worked something like the word "community" today.

"Ye enter" is a word that means "go or come into" and has the double meaning of "coming into one's mind."

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also."

The negative used here is the Greek negative of a subjective opinion. The sense is that "you don't want" to do something, not that it isn't done or don't think something that might be true. If it wasn't done or wasn't true, the objective negative of fact would be used.  

"Receive" is a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality.

The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners as the object of the verb.

The word translated as "go your ways out" means literally "to go or come out," "exceed all bounds", but it has a secondary meaning of "making something come true." It is in the form of an adjective, "going out into".  

The Greek word translated as "street" is actually an adjective meaning "broad." It means "street" in the exact same way as "Broadway" means a "main street." However, in an interesting coincidence, the verse puts actors on "Broadway" seems too perfect.

The word translated as "of the same" is the Greek word commonly translated as pronouns in English, but it has a few shades of meaning our pronouns do not have. The word technically means "the same," and when used as a pronoun can mean "the true self" as opposed to appearances.

"Says" means "to say" and "to speak" also. However, it has less a sense of teaching and more a sense of addressing and proclaiming. It is in the form of a command. 

Vocabulary: 

εἰς (prep) "Into" is eis, which means "into (of place)," "up to (of time)", "until (of time)", "as much as (of measure or limit)", "as far as (of measure or limit)", "towards (to express relation)", "in regard to (to express relation)", "of an end or limit," and "for (of purpose or object)."

ἣν (pron sg fem acc) "Whatsoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

δ᾽ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if").

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

πόλιν (noun sg fem acc) "City" is polis, which means "city", "citadel", "one's city", "one's country", "community", "state", "state affairs," and "civic duties." 

εἰσέλθητε (verb 2nd pl aor subj act) "Enter" is eiserchomai which means both "to go into", "to come in", "to enter", "to enter an office", "to enter a charge," (as in court) and "to come into one's mind."

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." 

μὴ (partic) "Not" is me , which is the negative used in prohibitions and expressions of doubt meaning "not" and "no." As οὐ (ou) negates fact and statement; μή rejects, οὐ denies; μή is relative, οὐ absolute; μή subjective, οὐ objective. 

δέχωνται (verb 3rd pl pres subj mp) "They may receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

ὑμᾶς, (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ἐξελθόντεςεἰς (part pl aor act masc nom) "Go your ways out" is exerchomai, which means "to come or go out of " "to march forth", "go out on", "to stand forth", "to exceed all bounds", "to come to an end", "to go out of office," and [of dreams or prophecies] "to come true."

τὰς πλατείας  (noun pl fem acc) "Streets" is from plateia, which is an adjective that means "wide", "broad", "over a wide area", "broad sbroad-shoulderedman]", "far advanced [of seasons]", "strong [oath]", "widespread", "flat of the hand", "frequent," and "street."

αὐτῆς (adj sg fem gen) "Of the same" is autos, which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

εἴπατε (verb 2nd pl aor imperat act) "Say" is eipon, which means "to speak", "to say", "to recite", "to address", "to mention", "to name", "to proclaim", "to plead", "to promise," and "to offer."

Related Verses: 

Jan 11 2018