Luke 10:16 He that heareth you heareth me;

KJV Verse: 

Luk 10:16 He that heareth you heareth me; and he that despiseth you despiseth me; and he that despiseth me despiseth him that sent me.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

The one hearing about you about me hears. And the one rejecting you me rejects. The one, however, that me has rejected, has rejected the one dispatching me. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The KJV in English is a lot less interesting than the Greek. There is an opposing idea here hidden in English translation. The second "and" here is not an "and" at all and signals a change from the present tense to a tense referring to another point in time, usually translated as the past. The word translated as "despise" doesn't refer to an emotional state at all. It is the opposite of "accept" or "welcome". or "believe", which are the words used in the more positive forms of this idea in the Gospels. 

"The one hearing " is a Greek verb that means "to hear" and "to listen." It has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. Here, however, because of the form of the object, only "hear" works ("hear about"). However, it is in the form of an adjective, "hearing." Since it is preceded by an article, the sense is "the one hearing". 

The word translated as "you" is plural. It is the possessive form. However, when the possessive form ("of you")  is used as the object of a verb, the sense is ‘about’ or ‘concerning’, in this case, "about you". 

"Heareth" is translated from a Greek word that has the same sense as the English not only of listening but of understanding. Here, however, because of the form of the object, only "hear" works. 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me". The form is again possessive ("of me") is used as the object of a verb, the sense is ‘about’ or ‘concerning’, in this case, "about me". 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also") and, in a series, is best translated as "not only...but also." 

The Greek word translated as "he that despiseth" means "to deny", "to disapprove of," and "to break faith" with someone. However, in this verse Jesus uses it as the opposite of "receive" (Matthew 10:40 et all)  or "believe" (John 12:44) so the sense is "reject". It is in the form of an adjective, "rejecting", preceded by an article, "the one rejecting". 

The word translated as "you" is plural. It is the objective form not the possessive.

The Greek word translated as "despiseth" means "to deny", "to disapprove of," and "to break faith" with someone. The sense here is reject. It is in the present tense. 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek used as an object.

The opposing idea begins here but it is hidden by the English "and". The Greek word translated as "and" joins phrases in an adversarial way. It is usually translated as "but", but since it always falls in the second position, translating it as "however" often captures its feeling better. When used in writing, it creates complex sentences, but when spoken, it makes a good pausing point so that an important or humorous word can follow.

The Greek word translated as "he that despiseth" is different from the first version because it is in a tense indicating some other point of time, other than the present. The word means "to deny", "to disapprove of," and "to break faith" with someone. It again is an adjective used as a noun. Translating it as the past works out as "the one having rejected." 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek used as an object.

The Greek word translated as "despiseth" again means "to deny", "to disapprove of," and "to break faith" with someone. It is not in the present tense, but the tense indicating some other point in time, "has rejected". 

The "him that sent" here is a word that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is the source of our word "apostle." The form is an adjective used as a noun, "the one dispatching." 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek used as an object.

Vocabulary: 

ἀκούων (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that heareth " is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." 

ὑμῶν  (pron 2nd pl gen) "Your" is humon, the plural possessive form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." 

 ἐμοῦ (noun sg masc gen) "Me" is emou, which means "me", and "mine". 

ἀκούει, (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Heareth" is akouo, which means "hear of", "hear tell of", "what one actually hears", "know by hearsay", "listen to", "give ear to", "hear and understand," and "understand." 

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ἀθετῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "He that despiseth " is atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to "break faith with."

ὑμᾶς (pron 2nd pl acc) "You" is humas which is the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you." -- The "you" here is plural, indicating all Christ's listeners as the object of the verb.

 ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my".

ἀθετεῖ: (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Despiseth" is atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to "break faith with."

 (article  sg masc nom) "He that" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction. -- The word translated as "goods" is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one." The Greek article is much closer to our demonstrative pronouns ("this", "that", "these", "those"). See this article for more. 

δὲ (conj/adv) "But" is de which means "but" and "on the other hand." It is the particle that joins sentences in an adversarial way but can also be a weak connective ("and") and explanation of cause ("so") and a condition ("if"). 

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regularfirst-person pronoun in Greek.

ἀθετῶν (part sg pres act masc nom) "Despiseth" is atheteô (atheteo), which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to "break faith with."

θετεῖ (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Despiseth" is atheteo, which means "to deny", "to disprove", "to cancel", "to render ineffective," and to "break faith with."

τὸν ἀποστείλαντά (part sg aor act masc acc) "Him that sent " is apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch."

με. (noun 1st sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regularfirst-person pronoun in Greek.

Related Verses: 

Jan 17 2018