Luke 9:48 Whosoever shall receive this child in my name receiveth me:

KJV Verse: 

Luk 9:48 Whosoever shall receive this child in my name receiveth me: and whosoever shall receive me receiveth him that sent me: for he that is least among you all, the same shall be great.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

That one who might welcome this one here, the child upon that name of mine welcomes me, and whoever might welcome me welcomes the one sending me since the least among all you, being the beginning, this one is great. 

Hidden Meaning: 

The most important idea here, that children are great because they are at the beginning of their lives is lost in translation here. What seems to be a simple "to be" verb is something very special. The first part of this verse is close to Matthew 18:5  and Mark 9:37, but the last part resembles Matthew 18:4

The word translated as "whoever" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause.

Untranslated is a Greek particle that indicates something might possibly happen. 

"Shall receive" is a Greek word that is used four times in this verse, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality." The sense is more "welcome" than the more general "receive".  The form could be the future tense, "shall receive" but because of the earlier particle, the form is more likely that of possibility, "might". 

The word used for "child" means specifically a "little child." It is a play on another word later on the verse that Jesus also uses to mean child. More about all these words Jesus uses for child in this article. 

The word translated as "in" means "against", "before", "during", "by" or "on." This is not the word usually translated as "in" but it is frequently, but not always, used in this phrase. The sense is "upon" my name. 

"My" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek in the possessive form, so "my" or "of me".

The Greek word translated as "name" is much more complicated than it might at first appear. It can simply mean a "name" as in English, this can be many things. It doesn't mean the things itself, but what people call it. For example, it can mean a "false name," or "a pretense" as we say "this is a marriage in name only." It can also mean representing another person's authority, as we say, "he is acting in the name of the boss."

"Receiveth" is a word, which, when applied to people as it does here, means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality. The form he is the present tense, but a form that indicates someone acting on or for themselves. 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek. In the Greek, the "my" and the "me" are next to each other. 

The Greek word translated as "and" is used as the conjunction "and", but it also is used to add emphasis ("also").

The "whoever" here is the same as above. 

There is another "might" here. 

"Me" is the regular first-person pronoun in Greek.

"Shall receive" is the same verb that means "to welcome", "to grant access," or "to receive with hospitality." Again, the form is more likely that of possibility, "might". 

"Receiveth" is again the same word as above, repeating the present form used before. 

The "him that sent me" here is a verb that means "to send off" and "dispatch." It is in the form of an adjective, "sending" used as a noun, "the one sending".  The Greek word is the source of our word "apostle."

The word translated as "for" introduces a reason or explanation so "because" and, in questions, "why."  To prevent a run-on sentence, it can be translated as "this is why" or "this is because..." to start a new sentence.

The verb translated as "he that is" is not the regular verb "to be". It is an uncommon verb that means to "take the initiative",  "to be the beginning", and many other meanings. It means literally "above beginning". It is in the form of an adjective, so "being the beginning." The sense here is that children are the beginning. 

Before "least" is the article "the," is untranslated.  Here, it is separated from the noun by the "for" since it comes much earlier in the Greek than the KJV translation. 

The word translated as "least" means "smallest" and similar ideas. It is introduced by an article so "the least". 

"Among" is the proposition usually translated as "in" but also means among. 

The word translated as "all" is the Greek adjective meaning "all", "the whole", "every," and similar ideas. When it is used as a noun, we would say "everything." Since the following "you" is plural, it already indicated all of Jesus's listeners, so this "all" is broader than just those listening. 

The last three Greek words form their own sentence, "this is great". 

The word translated in KJV as "the same" means "this one" or "that one" or the nearer one". 

The verb "shall be" here is the common form of "to be" in Greek. It means to have a certain characteristic or remain in a certain condition. It is not in the future tense but the present. 

The word translated as "great" means "big", "high" "great," and "impressive."

Vocabulary: 

Ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. 

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

δέξηται (verb 3rd sg aor subj mid) "Shall receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. 

τοῦτο (adj sg neut acc) "This" is touto, which means "from here", "from there", "this [thing]," or "that [thing]." --

τὸ παιδίον (noun sg neut acc) "Child" is from paidon. which means "little child" or "young child," (up to seven years) "infant" or "young slave."

ἐπὶ (prep) "in" is epi, which means "on", "upon", "at", "by", "before", "across," "during", and "against."

τῷ ὀνόματί (noun sg neut dat) "Name" is onoma, which means "name." It means both the reputation of "fame," and "a name and nothing else," as opposed to a real person. Acting in someone's name means to act on their behalf, as their representative. 

μου (noun sg masc gen) "My" is mou, which means "me", and "mine". --  

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -

δέχεται, (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

καὶ (conj) "And" is kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

ὃς (pron sg masc nom) "Whoever" is hos, which means "this", "that", "he", "she", "which", "what", "who", "whosoever", "where", "for which reason," and many similar meanings. -- The word translated as "who" is a demonstrative pronoun ("this" "that"), but it often acts as a pronoun ("the one that), especially a connective pronoun ("the one that") introducing a dependent clause..

ἂν (particle) Untranslated is an, which is a particle used with verbs to indicate that the action is limited by circumstances or defined by conditions. There is no exact equivalent in English, but it is translated as "would have", "might", "should," and "could."

ἐμὲ (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". --

δέξηται (verb 3rd sg aor subj mid) "Shall receive" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things. 

δέχεται (verb 3rd sg pres ind mp) "Receiveth" is dechomai, which means "welcome", "accept," and "entertain" when applied to people and "take", "accept," and "receive" when applied to things.

τὸν ἀποστείλαντά (part sg aor act masc acc) "That sent" is apostello, which means "to send off", "to send away," or "to dispatch." 

με: (noun sg masc acc) "Me" is eme, which means "I", "me", and "my". -- "Me" is the regularfirst-person pronoun in Greek.

(article) Untranslated is the Greek article, "the," which usually proceeds a noun and, without a noun, takes the meaning of "the one" or, in the plural, "the ones." Here it is separated from its noun by a conjunction.

γὰρ (partic) "For" comes from gar which is the introduction of a clause explaining a reason or explanation: "for", "since," and "as." In an abrupt question, it means "why" and "what." --

μικρότερος (adj sg masc nom comp) "Least" is mikros, which means "small", "little," and "young." It is one of several words Christ uses to refer to children.  

ἐν (prep) "In" is en, which means "in", "on", "at", "by", "among", "within", "surrounded by", "in one's hands", "in one's power," and "with". -- The word translated as "in" also means "within", "with," or "among."

πᾶσιν (adj pl masc dat ) "All" is pas, which means "all", "the whole", "every", "anyone", "all kinds," and "anything." In the adverbial form, it means "every way", "on every side", "in every way," and "altogether." --

ὑμῖν (pron 2nd pl dat) "You" is humin the plural form of su the pronoun of the second person, "you."

ὑπάρχων  [uncommon](part pl pres act masc nom) "He that is"  is from hyparcho, which means to "begin", "take the initiative", "to be the beginning", "to be already in existence", "to be laid down", "to be taken for granted", "belong to", "fall to one", "accrue",  of persons, "to be devoted to one",  "existing circumstances", "present advantages", and "the fact is that".

οὗτός (adj sg masc nom) "The same" is houtos, which as an adjective means "this", "that", "the nearer."

ἐστιν (verb 3rd sg pres ind act) "Shall be" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." (The future form is esomai. The 3rd person present indicative is "esti.")

μέγας. (adj sg masc nom) "Great" is megas, which means "big", "full-grown", "vast", "high", "great", "mighty", "strong (of the elements)","loud" (of sounds), "over-great (with a bad sense), "impressive" (of style), and "long" ( of days). 

Related Verses: 

Dec 27 2017