John 10:11 I am the good shepherd:

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

I am a leader, a wonderful one. The leader, a wonderful one, establishes his spirit over the flock. >

KJV : 

Jhn 10:11 I am the good shepherd: the good shepherd giveth his life for the sheep.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The original Greek shows an article ("the" or, in Greek, ) before the word translated as "good." This indicates an adjective used as a noun. The word translated as "good' means something closer to "wonderful." Christ uses it in opposition to the Greek word meaning useless.

The word translated as "giveth" is not the word always translated as "give" in the NT (didomi). It is a verb almost always translated as "put" in the NT. Since we are dealing with an "amen, amen" or "verily, verily" section of verses here, we go to the metaphorical meaning which is "to put in one's mind."

The word translated as "life" (psyche) is not the word that Christ uses when he talks about "eternal life." It doesn't represent physical life at all, but the consciousness of spirit.

Finally, the word translated as "for" is a very complicated preposition. You can read its long definition in the vocabulary section, but if we are looking as how it relates consciousness to the flock, the meaning that works best is "on behalf of."

If Christ is talking about the nature of reality here, the idea is that our very consciousness as followers of Christ has been changed because we share in Christ's consciousness.

Greek Vocabulary: 

Ἐγώ "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and for myself.

εἰμι 1st sg pres ind act) "Am" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ποιμὴν "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

καλός: "Good" is from kalos (kalos), which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

ποιμὴν "Shepherd" is from poimên (poimen), which means "herdsmen", "shepherd," and, generally, "captain," and "chief."

καλὸς "Good" is from kalos (kalos), which means "beautiful", "good", "of fine quality", "noble," and "honorable." It is most often translated as "good" juxtaposed with "evil" in the New Testament, but the two ideas are closer to "wonderful" and "worthless", "noble" and "base."

τὴν ψυχὴν "Life" is from psuchê (psyche), which means "breath", "life", "self", "spirit," and "soul." It has the clear sense of the conscious self and is often translated as "life" in the Gospels. It is also used to describe "the spirit" of things. It is often translated as "soul."

αὐτοῦ "His" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

τίθησιν (3rd sg pres ind act ) "Giveth" is from tithêmi (tithemi) which means "to put", "to place", "to propose", "to suggest," and a metaphor for "to put in one's mind." In a military sense, it means both "to bear arms" and "to lay down and surrender." It also means to "lay in a grave," and "bury." In writing, it means putting words on paper.

ὑπὲρ "For" is from huper (hyper), which means "over" (of place), "above' (in a state of rest), "off' (ships at sea), "over" and "across (in a state of motion), "over", "beyond", "on behalf of one (metaphor), "for", "instead of", "in the name of", "as a representative of" (in an entreaty), "for" and "because of" (of the cause of motive), "concerning", "exceeding" "above" and "beyond" (of measure), "above" and "upwards" (of numbers), "before" and "earlier than" (of time), "over much" and "beyond measure" (as an adverb), "for" and "in deference of" (doing a thing), and "above measure."

τῶν προβάτων: "The sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks."