John 10:26 But ye believe not,

Greek : 

Literal Verse: 

However, you do not trust in my words since you are not from this flock of mine. >

KJV : 

Jhn 10:26 But ye believe not, because ye are not of my sheep, as I said unto you.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

At the beginning of this chapter, Christ made the point that his followers accept what he says simply because it sounds right (Jhn 10:4) while they do not accept what sounds wrong (Jhn 10:5). In the previous verse, Christ made the point about trusting actions over words. Here, he connects those two ideas: those are who are not his followers cannot believe his words despite his actions.

"Believe" here seems to refers to the idea of trusting someone words, a sense of the word "believe" that was stronger in Greek than it is in English. Both types of believing can extend to many things, but in Greek it refers primarily to trusting words especially of a specific person as opposed to abstract knowledge from books, for example.

There are many ways to say "my sheep" in Greek, but the form here is accentuated, using two articles, one for "sheep" and one for "my." The effect is more like using a demonstrative pronoun in English.

Related Verses: 

Greek Vocabulary: 

ἀλλὰ "But" is from alla (alla), which means "otherwise", "but", "still", "at least", "except", "yet," nevertheless", "rather", "moreover," and "nay." It denotes an exception or a simple opposition.

ὑμεῖς "You" is from hymeis, which are the singular nominative form of the second person, "you."

οὐ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

πιστεύετε, (2nd pl pres ind act) "Believe" is from pisteuô (pisteuo), which means "to trust, put faith in, or rely on a person", "to believe in someone's words", "to comply", "to feel confident in a thing," and "to entrust in a thing."

ὅτι "That" is from hoti (hoti), which introduces a statement of fact "with regard to the fact that", "seeing that," and acts as a causal adverb meaning "for what", "because", "since," and "wherefore."

οὐκ "Not" is from οὐ ou which is the negative adverb for facts and statements, negating both single words and sentences. The other negative adverb, μή applies to will and thought; οὐ denies, μή rejects; οὐ is absolute, μή relative; οὐ objective, μή subjective.

ἐστὲ (2nd pl pres ind act) "Are" is eimi, which means "to be", "to exist", "to be the case," and "is possible." It can also mean "must" with a dative.

ἐκ "From" is from ek, which means 1) [of motion] "out of", "from", "by", "away from;" 2) [of place] "beyond", "outside of", "beyond;" 3) [of succession] "after", "from;" 4) [of rest] "on", "in," 5) [of time] "since", "from", "at", "in;" 5) [of materials] "out of", "made from."

τῶν προβάτων "Sheep" is from probaton, which means any domesticated four-footed animal, "sheep", "cattle", "herds," and "flocks."

τῶν ἐμῶν. "My" is from emos, which means "mine", "of me", "my", "relating to me," and "against me."