John 6:54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood,

KJV Verse: 

Jhn 6:54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.

Greek Verse: 

Literal Alternative: 

The [one] of mine grazing on the physical and soaking in kinship holds perpetual life, and I might rouse him to action on the final day.

Interesting and Hidden Aspects: 

The first surprise here is that Christ changes the word that gets translated as "eat." We don't see this in English but the previous verb used for "to eat (esthiô) is changed here to another word entirely, trogo, which specifically means eating vegetables, describing, for example, cows grazing in the field. It is a lighter word, as we might use "munching" or "snacking."

Christ is clearly lightening or, in my view, making light, of his rather ghastly, exaggerated images of the previous verse regarding eating on his flesh.

Another hidden change is the use of "my." In the previous verse, it clearly referred to Christ's blood, but here it refers more to the person who is doing the eating and drinking. In Greek, this phrase is more like "my eater of flesh and my drinker of blood." Again, the emphasis seems to be on our kinship with Christ, our shared experience of being humans, eating and drinking to survive.

In referencing "eternal life" in the second half of this verse, Christ uses the same words as he did earlier in Jhn 6:44. While the verb tense could be the future, it might also be the subjunctive, indicating a possibility rather than a certainty.

Greek Vocabulary: 

τρώγων (sg pres act masc nom) "Whoso eateth" is from trogo, which means "to eat vegatable", "to nibble", "to munch," and "to eat fruits or desserts."

μου "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

τὴν σάρκα "Flesh" is from sarx (sarx), which means "flesh", "the body", "fleshy", "the pulp of fruit", "meat," and "the physical and natural order of things" (opposite of the spiritual or supernatural).

καὶ "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

πίνων (part sg pres act masc nom) "Drinketh" is from pinô (pino), which means "to drink", "to celebrate," and "soak up."

μου "My" is from mou, which mean "my," or "mine."

τὸ αἷμα "Blood" is haima (haima), which means "blood", "bloodshed," and "kindship."

ἔχει (3rd sg pres ind act) "Hath" is from echô (echo), which means "to have", "to hold", "to possess", "to keep", "to have charge of", "to maintain", "to hold fast", "to bear", "to keep close", "to keep safe," and "to have means to do."

ζωὴν "Life" is from zôê (zoe), which means "living", "substance", "property", "existence," and, incidentally, "the scum on milk." It has the sense of how we say "make a living" to mean property. Homer used it more to mean the opposite of death.

αἰώνιον, "Everlasting" is from aiônios (aionios), which means "lasting for an age", "perpetual," and "eternal." From "aion" which is used in the bible to mean an "age."

κἀγὼ "And I" is from kago, a contraction of kai ego. "And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just." "I" is from ego, which is the first person singular pronoun meaning "I". It also means "I at least", "for my part", "indeed," and "for myself."

ἀναστήσω (1st sg fut ind act or 1st sg aor subj act) "Will raise" is from anistêmi (anistemi), which means "to make stand up", "to raise up", "to raise from sleep", "to wake up", "to raise from the dead", "to rouse to action", "to put up for sale", "to make people rise", "to emigrate", "to transplant," and "to rise and leave the sanctuary."

αὐτὸν "Him" is from autos (autos), which means "the same," and the reflexive pronouns, "myself", "yourself", "himself", "herself", "itself," or the oblique case of the pronouns, "him", "her," and "it." It also means "one's true self," that is, "the soul" as opposed to the body and "of one's own accord."

τῇ ἐσχάτῃ "The last" is from eschatos (eschatos). In space, this means "furthest." In degree, it means "uttermost" and "highest." In persons, it means "lowest" and "meanest." Of time, it means "last" and "ending."

ἡμέρᾳ: "Day" is from hemera, which, as a noun, means "day" "a state or time of life", "a time (poetic)", "day break" and "day time." It is also and also has a second meaning, of "quiet", "tame (animals)", "cultivated (crops)," and "civilized (people)."

"And" is from kai, which is the conjunction joining phrases and clauses, "and," or "but." After words implying sameness, "as" (the same opinion as you). Used in series, joins positive with negative "Not only...but also." Also used to give emphasis, "even", "also," and "just."

Related Verses: